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No I ain't in it.

The below is from the MDJ. If you are surprised by a garbage dump under your building site during the construction phase, you have hired a bad engineer. If you are surprised by subsurface granite under your Paulding County building site during the construction phase, you have hired an incompetent engineer, contractor, everyone in house that had anything to do with the bid and the board that approved it. 'Cause much like that hot sauce in the commercial, that #&@% is everywhere.

"Building site revealing costly surprises for Paulding jail builders

Paulding jail renderingAn artist's rendering of the new Paulding County jail and sheriff's office headquarters in Dallas is shown. Staff - Tom Spigolon▲

Tom Spigolon

11 hrs ago

An unexpectedly large amount of rock and a significant underground garbage pit are some of the surprises builders encountered in recent months as they worked to keep Pauldings new jail on schedule and within budget.

 

They also made a costly change to part of the building facade to conform to city of Dallas building design requirements, and likely will not be able to save some trees on the north side of the site to complete construction, said Eric Johnson of project manager Comprehensive Program Services.

 

Johnson said he believed the project still can be completed in early 2020 rather than being delayed to April 2020 as construction manager Turner Construction Co. estimated.

 

 

The big delay is in getting all of the rock out of the way, he told commissioners.

 

Commissioner Todd Pownall told Johnson his report about the $60 million adult detention center and sheriffs office administration building seems a little tough.

 

I want to start saying, Are we on time and under budget? After that report, Im a little concerned, Pownall said. Weve got a lot of work to do.

 

Johnson said Turner Construction encountered an estimated 11,000 cubic yards of underground granite. Removal of the rock is required before construction can proceed and could add about $665,000 to the cost, he said.

 

The granite which would be roughly the length and depth of a football field if all situated in one spot -- is too hard to be dug out by excavation machinery and must be blasted out, Johnson said.

 

The builder is working to determine its exact size and location but it apparently is spread over much of the building site. It also likely is in greater concentration beneath the planned eastern end of the 191,000-square-foot complex, he said.

 

He said project architect Wakefield, Beasley & Associates considered building redesign options that cost up to $1.8 million. The construction team determined rock removal was the least costly option and was able to negotiate the cost to about $665,000, he said.

 

It could go higher based on actual measured quantities (of rock) but we are working hard with the team to bring the cost down, Johnson said after the meeting.

 

He said he planned to meet with Nova Engineering concerning the amount of underground rock found. Nova did the testing of the sites subsurface area to determine if it was suitable for construction.

 

Ive had some questions. I dont have any answers, Johnson told commissioners. Well get to the bottom of it.

 

Meanwhile, builders discovered a trash pit directly beneath the planned site of a jail visitation building that will not be attached to the main complex building, Johnson said.

 

He said he has not determined the cost of relocating the building but it cannot be built atop a trash pit, he said.

 

The pit is 300 feet long and 8 feet deep and filled with parts of trees and other organic materials apparently cleared from a past construction site. Johnson said he was unsure of its origin but it could have come from the site cleared for the nearby county government complex in the mid-2000s.

 

 

In addition, precast building facade panels designed to bring the facility into conformance with Dallas city building design standards cost about $290,000 and are set to arrive on site Oct. 1, he said.

 

County government services director Scott Greene said the project is located in the citys Corridor Overlay District and New Town Zoning District which require buildings to have additional design features to promote high quality development as part of the citys future building design and zoning plan.

 

The Dallas Planning Commission must approve building plans before construction can proceed and did so Aug. 2, Greene said.

 

Johnson said he would return to give commissioners updates on the project Oct. 9.

 

The detention center is planned as a 660-bed, 133,000-square-foot jail facility, while the adjacent sheriff's office headquarters will include 58,000 square feet.

 

It is being funded through bond financing of up to $77 million for its design and construction that county voters approved in November 2016.

 

The entire complex will operate on part of a 25-acre site surrounded by the former WellStar Paulding hospital building on West Memorial Drive, the Norfolk Southern Railroad tracks, and the county courthouse and government complex on U.S. Hwy. 278.

 

It will replace the current 30-year-old sheriffs office and 200-bed jail off Dallas-Acworth Highway northeast of Dallas that Sheriff Gary Gulledge said has numerous maintenance problems and does not conform to state standards for detention facilities."

Edited by Blunt Trauma
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I read this.

 

Good Lord, somebody made a killing and lined their pockets.

 

I’m a simple citizen and remember the landfill and the dump up there. I know we have a vein of granite out this way. Walmart had to blast when they were building out on the highway and that vein runs right up to where the sheriff is.

 

Just dayum, it’s like Moe, Larry and Curley are running the show.

 

Mo taxes.

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1979 my exFIL, who wasn't from around here, decided he wanted the country dream of buying a piece of land and putting together a homestead. He purchased himself 27 acres for 27,000 and thought he was a land baron developer. He made arrangements to buy two double wides and move his family along with his wife's sisters family out to it. The grader was hired and the driveway and home sites were graded. The homes were delivered and set up. At this point in came the power, septic and well drilling process.

The 27 acres was just about behind the eventual wastewater plant near whats now the by-pass. To get a well and septic in ended up costing him as much as the land, houses and grading put together.

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My question would be didn't they see any of these problems when the courthouse was built? If not then how did they miss the rock and landfill with both of the buildings they built. They had to have drilled for soil samples back then.

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Wouldn't the seller of the land need to disclose this information (that he/she had a dump on their land?) Tax records show the previous owner had the property at least back until 1976.

That's the real kicker in the whole thing. The inferense of the story is the dump was created as a part of the courthouse construction. That would make it the counties waste on their own property that they where "surprised" by.

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That's the real kicker in the whole thing. The inferense of the story is the dump was created as a part of the courthouse construction. That would make it the counties waste on their own property that they where "surprised" by.

. SMH. Another move is not something I would like to add to my plans...to darn old to pack up and go ...and darn sure don’t want more taxes! I mean I don’t mind helping to pay for something that is needed...but this county has a habit of doing a lot of things that’s are not. And before anyone gets their drawers in a wad ..this is just my humble opinion.
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That's the real kicker in the whole thing. The inferense of the story is the dump was created as a part of the courthouse construction. That would make it the counties waste on their own property that they where "surprised" by.

Exactly!

 

Again, seriously who are these people making these decisions when the common taxpayer knows what’s on that land.

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It would be interesting to learn whose brother-in-law "performed" the engineering studies for the new construction.

Like I said, somebody lined their pockets again with our money. And we just keep paying higher taxes.

The money end wouldn't come until the construction phase. I'd like to know if there's any relationship between the engineer/planner and the contractor.

I suspect incompetence as opposed to greed though.

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I’m wondering if the trash pit is located on the land the county bought recently to build the new jail on? And if so is it trash from the construction of our court house and administative complex.

 

If it is trash from the construction of the court house and administrative complex, then the original contractor should be liable for improperly disposing building debris.

 

As far as the rock, I’m wondering if an engineering company was hired to do soil testing?

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It would be interesting to learn whose brother-in-law "performed" the engineering studies for the new construction.

Would be just as interesting to know who approved/allowed/ignored the dumping of construction waste when the courthouse complex was built. There was not an actual garbage dump/landfill. I think this is more of an inert landfill.

 

My question is this: how likely is blasting at that site to damage the very expensive taxpayer-funded courthouse complex and other structures in the area?

 

the project is located in the citys Corridor Overlay District and New Town Zoning District which require buildings to have additional design features to promote high quality development as part of the citys future building design and zoning plan.

 

 

Hate to be the one to break the news, but the city needs to concentrate on some other more pressing issues if they want high quality ANYTHING in Dallas.

 

Design for the future, plan for today seems to be how everyone operates anymore, or maybe they wouldn't be tearing out the sidewalk installed a few years ago to put in a right turn lane on East Memorial at 61 N.

Because who in Paulding County ever dreamed that would be needed? <<<----sarcasm.

Edited by rednekkhikkchikk
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Would be just as interesting to know who approved/allowed/ignored the dumping of construction waste when the courthouse complex was built. There was not an actual garbage dump/landfill. I think this is more of an inert landfill.

 

My question is this: how likely is blasting at that site to damage the very expensive taxpayer-funded courthouse complex and other structures in the area?

 

 

If what the article states is there is actually what the problem is, then you're right about the landfill, probably, kinda. It's the same thing you see in old sub divisions before building codes. They buried everything that should have been burn pitted or hauled off. The unlucky soul who buys that lot ends up with a sink hole and bad foundation. The ironic part is they were building to house the office that handles inspections of those codes.

 

It would take access to the "as built" plans of the courthouse to answer your question. We could get way yonder in the weeds on blasting, but it all boils down to the engineering and execution. A good blasting outfit can handle the execution, no problem. If the same folks are doing the engineering as who did it for the jail, I ain't the least bit confident.

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this oops in planning makes about as much sense as the idiot that decided that the tag office, the county office with the most foot traffic in the entire gov't complex, is going to be located on the 3rd floor. meanwhile, the first floor (and outside offices) in that building are rarely visited......

 

------- would you rather replace door hinges, or an entire worn-out elevator?

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this oops in planning makes about as much sense as the idiot that decided that the tag office, the county office with the most foot traffic in the entire gov't complex, is going to be located on the 3rd floor. meanwhile, the first floor (and outside offices) in that building are rarely visited......

 

------- would you rather replace door hinges, or an entire worn-out elevator?

 

Ain't *that* the truth!

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I noticed that we spent many dollars to purchase the old bank building , gut it and spent whatever to renovate it for the water department which is in the courthouse complex.

. Yep when I moved to paulding the water place was on Macland since then this will be the 4th move, and all the money spent on moves and the water still stinks and tastes bad.
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. Yep when I moved to paulding the water place was on Macland since then this will be the 4th move, and all the money spent on moves and the water still stinks and tastes bad.

 

As I recall it's moved from Macland Road, over to the building by the stinky fields, then back to Macland Road, then to the courthouse. Like you, I wonder how much was spent on those moves.

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If what the article states is there is actually what the problem is, then you're right about the landfill, probably, kinda. It's the same thing you see in old sub divisions before building codes. They buried everything that should have been burn pitted or hauled off. The unlucky soul who buys that lot ends up with a sink hole and bad foundation. The ironic part is they were building to house the office that handles inspections of those codes.

 

It would take access to the "as built" plans of the courthouse to answer your question. We could get way yonder in the weeds on blasting, but it all boils down to the engineering and execution. A good blasting outfit can handle the execution, no problem. If the same folks are doing the engineering as who did it for the jail, I ain't the least bit confident.

we have two sink holes in our yard...filled them in twice with good fill dirt and a couple years later they are back..just about the width of a bucket they use to dig...our sub was built back in 1988 so it’s pretty safe to think it’s builders buried treasure lol. Our neighbor said they had septic problems at one time and they found drywall and other stuff in tank..don’t know if it’s true didn’t see it .
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we have two sink holes in our yard...filled them in twice with good fill dirt and a couple years later they are back..just about the width of a bucket they use to dig...our sub was built back in 1988 so it’s pretty safe to think it’s builders buried treasure lol. Our neighbor said they had septic problems at one time and they found drywall and other stuff in tank..don’t know if it’s true didn’t see it .

Your problem may well have started out as builders trash. But from what you describe its now more related to water. Dirt has to be carried away by something, even if its just further down the hole. Three things move dirt. Wind, water and gravity. Compaction of dirt into a hole can bridge over gravity until acted upon. If you didn't run over the filled hole and wind can't get to it, it's water.

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Your problem may well have started out as builders trash. But from what you describe its now more related to water. Dirt has to be carried away by something, even if its just further down the hole. Three things move dirt. Wind, water and gravity. Compaction of dirt into a hole can bridge over gravity until acted upon. If you didn't run over the filled hole and wind can't get to it, it's water.

ok the place we live is at the bottom of a pretty good incline and when it rains hard we get a lot of wash...maybe that’s it?
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