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Third grader handcuffed.


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You must comply, resistance is futile.

 

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Two northern Kentucky women have sued the Kenton County sheriff and one of his school resource officers for placing their two disabled elementary school children in handcuffs.

"You can do what we've asked you to, or you can suffer the consequences."

 

 

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=157&sid=35788248&title=parents-sue-officer-who-handcuffed-disabled-kids

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If a parent did that to their own child, CC, can you imagine how people would react? But, it was a cop who did it, and you will be hard pressed to get anyone to defend the child, in this case.

 

They are so intimidated, and scared of cops, that they would think this is fine, even with their own children.

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Is ADHD a disability? So, for children with ADHD that are out of control, there's nothing you can do?

 

My grandson and my son both had ADD growing up. I never put them on medication and they both knew they had to behave.

 

So now it's a disability and they can do what they want with no consequences?

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Disabled people get detained too. The restraints are for the officers protection. Placing a kid, even a disabled one in cuffs by an officer is not a crime nor is it abuse.

It is hard for people to believe how much damage a child of that size can do when they are out of control. They don't feel the pain no matter how hard you hold them to get them under control. The cuffs hurt because he was straining against them and also calming down. This child needs to learn to keep himself under control. This may not help him in that respect or it may. If he is unable to control himself as he gets older and bigger he will have to be dealt with by police. My son at 8 years head butted me and I saw stars. It is just so easy to judge others that are dealing with your disabled child, nobody is perfect. They could have done a lot of things but at the end of the day the child is still physically violent and I am not sure it is right to expect educators to deal with physically out of control children. The parents of other children might want to know why you allowed this child to hurt their children and yes they often direct this violence at other students and teachers. I have seen so many stories of restraining special needs children and it is always the wrong way.

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Again, ADHD is now a disability? They are labeled disabled and can do what they want?

 

Can they now get social security with that disability?

 

These folks with ADHD that were never taught self control are the ones you see out in the street and public acting crazy, doing whatever they want, because they got a free pass in school. They're also headed for jail.

 

And I understand it's a learning disability with hyperactivity involved, but they do know what they're doing. They're gaming you when they are out of control. They do have the ability to control themselves. Why in the world do we expect educators to take on all of these disabled children with their hands tied behind their backs. They can't do anything with them because they're afraid to. They'll lose their job and probably get sued. So they pass the buck and the child gets away with it.

 

That's what our society is becoming, people that don't know how to control themselves.

 

And honestly, since the little one started kindergarten last year in public school, I have never seen so many disabled children in my life. Some severly disabled. And I'm talking brain injured and a lot of cerebral palsy. I really don't understand what is going on.

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This is wrong on so many levels. No kid should be placed in handcuffs at school. There is no excuse for this. Kids with ADHD lack impulse control and no, they may not always know what they're doing. There is a proper way to deal with kids like this and this is NOT it. So now this kid with ADHD and a lack of impulse control will be scared of cops the rest of his life, I'm sure that will benefit us all. I find this highly disturbing.

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So this should be a lesson to us all. The next time we hear a story of some parent that tied his child up and stuck them in a closet we will know they were good parents just trying to teach their children a little self control.

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So this should be a lesson to us all. The next time we hear a story of some parent that tied his child up and stuck them in a closet we will know they were good parents just trying to teach their children a little self control.

 

 

Yes, and No, CC!

 

I think LPPT had a great point. But, police should not be left with this duty. It's what causes the live cowards of this country to cower to Civil Forfeiture.

 

Parents should be called, first, not the police.

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This is wrong on so many levels. No kid should be placed in handcuffs at school. There is no excuse for this. Kids with ADHD lack impulse control and no, they may not always know what they're doing. There is a proper way to deal with kids like this and this is NOT it. So now this kid with ADHD and a lack of impulse control will be scared of cops the rest of his life, I'm sure that will benefit us all. I find this highly disturbing.

What happens when he is older and does not control his impulses? Not trying to start an argument. I am just saying that if he doesn't learn control he will have every reason to fear the police because he will have a lot of interactions with them. The only consequences for his actions at this age are those created by the adults around him. He can now relate a very bad consequence in relation to him losing control in a violent manner. Being disruptive is one thing, being violent is another. How do you restrain him, beg him to stop? take the rest of the kids out of the classroom? Call mom? send him home?

I know if this kid hurt mine I would be outraged that my child had to be in class with a violent student that nobody was allowed to restrain. I am pretty sure if my kid defended himself he would be expelled.

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What happens when he is older and does not control his impulses? Not trying to start an argument. I am just saying that if he doesn't learn control he will have every reason to fear the police because he will have a lot of interactions with them. The only consequences for his actions at this age are those created by the adults around him. He can now relate a very bad consequence in relation to him losing control in a violent manner. Being disruptive is one thing, being violent is another. How do you restrain him, beg him to stop? take the rest of the kids out of the classroom? Call mom? send him home?

I know if this kid hurt mine I would be outraged that my child had to be in class with a violent student that nobody was allowed to restrain. I am pretty sure if my kid defended himself he would be expelled.

 

 

You are a smart woman, LPPT, unlike the one Jeff Foxworthy was told "I'm listening to what you're saying, but I just heard what I wants to."

 

But, cops shouldn't have to be called first.

 

People are relying to much on cops instead of educating themselves in the reality I try to preach every day. Denial is leading to cops controlling what we should be controlling.

 

You know how much people want my post moved to a locker. They don't want to hear that violent crime is down, amond citizens, but up for cops.

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So this should be a lesson to us all. The next time we hear a story of some parent that tied his child up and stuck them in a closet we will know they were good parents just trying to teach their children a little self control.

I have never been able to figure out how someone gets a toddler to sit in time out without restraining them or repeatedly placing them in a chair. I have had out of control toddlers that were too tired and sometimes hungry when they did not want to stop playing. I have restrained them and sometimes popped their butt when nothing else worked. I guess putting kids in corners and time out is cruel too. Most of the time children are only as traumatized by an event as much as adults tell them they are. ADHD does not effect the intelligence of a child, many are very intelligent. Every effort should be made to help them control themselves so they can learn. If threatening this child with the police coming back gets this child to immediately calm down, it could be the best thing that ever happened to him. Nobody creates synapses in exactly the same way. Many are just assuming that this will result in an unreasonable fear in the child.

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What happens when he is older and does not control his impulses? Not trying to start an argument. I am just saying that if he doesn't learn control he will have every reason to fear the police because he will have a lot of interactions with them. The only consequences for his actions at this age are those created by the adults around him. He can now relate a very bad consequence in relation to him losing control in a violent manner. Being disruptive is one thing, being violent is another. How do you restrain him, beg him to stop? take the rest of the kids out of the classroom? Call mom? send him home?

I know if this kid hurt mine I would be outraged that my child had to be in class with a violent student that nobody was allowed to restrain. I am pretty sure if my kid defended himself he would be expelled.

When the kid is older he won't be a 54 pound third grader. There's no reason to put handcuffs on a kid that small. Not to mention is that even legal to put them on his upper arms like that? If this kid was in high school and acting out in that way then I could see handcuffs. I'm assuming the staff knew about this child's condition. I'm also assuming they have lots of kids in their school with disabilities. Have they not been trained how to deal with this type of thing? Because I know they have at my sons school. There are a ton of ways for kids to learn self control. Even covered by insurance in the way of therapy. Some kids don't learn by being overwhelmed and frightened. So many times these kids react better to calmness, I'm not saying everybody should remain calm while the kids punching out every kid in his class. I'm saying when you physically restrain a child like this what you are actually doing is escalating the situation in his mind. Making it less and less likely he's going to calm down on his own any time soon. People who are properly trained would know that. Yes, you should call mom. And have him removed ASAP. If a kid like this hurt my kid would I be pissed? Yes I would. Because he obviously wasn't removed before it was allowed to escalate. I would be a helluva lot more pissed if my child were handcuffed in the 3rd grade.

Bottom line, every child is different. What works for one will not work for another. This is a subject I'm too emotionally invested in and I shouldn't have even commented at all. I will never agree that it's okay to put a third grader in handcuffs at school.

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I have never been able to figure out how someone gets a toddler to sit in time out without restraining them or repeatedly placing them in a chair. I have had out of control toddlers that were too tired and sometimes hungry when they did not want to stop playing. I have restrained them and sometimes popped their butt when nothing else worked. I guess putting kids in corners and time out is cruel too. Most of the time children are only as traumatized by an event as much as adults tell them they are. ADHD does not effect the intelligence of a child, many are very intelligent. Every effort should be made to help them control themselves so they can learn. If threatening this child with the police coming back gets this child to immediately calm down, it could be the best thing that ever happened to him. Nobody creates synapses in exactly the same way. Many are just assuming that this will result in an unreasonable fear in the child.

 

 

Children should be restrained by someone who loves them, LPPT, not a cop. It's becoming more and more obvious to people that calling 911 often results in the cops coming and killing your autistic child, for non compliance.

Edited by The Postman
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When the kid is older he won't be a 54 pound third grader. There's no reason to put handcuffs on a kid that small. Not to mention is that even legal to put them on his upper arms like that? If this kid was in high school and acting out in that way then I could see handcuffs. I'm assuming the staff knew about this child's condition. I'm also assuming they have lots of kids in their school with disabilities. Have they not been trained how to deal with this type of thing? Because I know they have at my sons school. There are a ton of ways for kids to learn self control. Even covered by insurance in the way of therapy. Some kids don't learn by being overwhelmed and frightened. So many times these kids react better to calmness, I'm not saying everybody should remain calm while the kids punching out every kid in his class. I'm saying when you physically restrain a child like this what you are actually doing is escalating the situation in his mind. Making it less and less likely he's going to calm down on his own any time soon. People who are properly trained would know that. Yes, you should call mom. And have him removed ASAP. If a kid like this hurt my kid would I be pissed? Yes I would. Because he obviously wasn't removed before it was allowed to escalate. I would be a helluva lot more pissed if my child were handcuffed in the 3rd grade.

Bottom line, every child is different. What works for one will not work for another. This is a subject I'm too emotionally invested in and I shouldn't have even commented at all. I will never agree that it's okay to put a third grader in handcuffs at school.

 

 

Outstanding response, jenilyn, outstanding!

 

It is the last next to the last sentence that spoiled some of the value you just spoke.

 

"This is a subject I'm too emotionally invested in and I shouldn't have even commented at all."

 

Because, YES you should! How else are our p.com friends, and guests going to hear such wonderful words of understandind, and ethical values in the real world?

Edited by The Postman
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I'm thinking it was probably the resource officer at the school TP.

Isn't it odd that for several years now we've had to have resource officers (cops, deputies, ect) at our schools now to be available for trouble.

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I have never been able to figure out how someone gets a toddler to sit in time out without restraining them or repeatedly placing them in a chair. I have had out of control toddlers that were too tired and sometimes hungry when they did not want to stop playing. I have restrained them and sometimes popped their butt when nothing else worked. I guess putting kids in corners and time out is cruel too. Most of the time children are only as traumatized by an event as much as adults tell them they are. ADHD does not effect the intelligence of a child, many are very intelligent. Every effort should be made to help them control themselves so they can learn. If threatening this child with the police coming back gets this child to immediately calm down, it could be the best thing that ever happened to him. Nobody creates synapses in exactly the same way. Many are just assuming that this will result in an unreasonable fear in the child.

 

Well then LPPT then you might be a big fan of Mexico's approach to dealing with the disabled and the unruly child.

 

 

Just curious did you tie you children up with rope or did you keep a set of handcuffs around the house ?

Edited by CitizenCain
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I'm thinking it was probably the resource officer at the school TP.

Isn't it odd that for several years now we've had to have resource officers (cops, deputies, ect) at our schools now to be available for trouble.

Columbine changed a lot of things.

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Well then LPPT then you might be a big fan of Mexico's approach to dealing with the disabled and the unruly child.

 

 

 

You don't agree with whipping an unruly, defiant child? And I'm not talking about mentally and physically handicapped children like what you're showing.

 

Again, when did ADHD become a disability? to allow total chaos?

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You don't agree with whipping an unruly, defiant child? And I'm not talking about mentally and physically handicapped children like what you're showing.

 

Again, when did ADHD become a disability? to allow total chaos?

 

 

This country is not rich enough to do anything but restrain the unruly, Lo!

 

We don't have the money is the only reason we have to be like Mexico.

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I understand that ADHD is a learning disability that can be controlled with or without medication.

 

I also just looked it up, and it does qualify for SS Disability benefits. Even an adult with ADHD can get SS benefits.

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Outstanding response, jenilyn, outstanding!

 

It is the last next to the last sentence that spoiled some of the value you just spoke.

 

"This is a subject I'm too emotionally invested in and I shouldn't have even commented at all."

 

Because, YES you should! How else are our p.com friends, and guests going to hear such wonderful words of understandind, and ethical values in the real world?

I've been immersed in a world that I never thought I would be since having my son. It has open my eyes to a lot of things. I have to be his number one advocate and because of that, I find myself wanting to advocate for others. I realize I shouldn't keep quiet because people who keep quiet can't teach anybody anything. You're right. I've just never been the kind of person who enjoys a debate.

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I understand that ADHD is a learning disability that can be controlled with or without medication.

 

I also just looked it up, and it does qualify for SS Disability benefits. Even an adult with ADHD can get SS benefits.

 

 

Well we do do our children better than rich Mexican's; don't we, Lo?

 

That must have been the Republican "Family Value's" people who created that program.

Edited by The Postman
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You don't agree with whipping an unruly, defiant child?

 

What is your definition of whipping a child, and when you "whip" a child what lesson do you think you're teaching them ?

 

That all conflicts can be solved by physical violence.

 

I understand that ADHD is a learning disability that can be controlled with or without medication.

 

I also just looked it up, and it does qualify for SS Disability benefits. Even an adult with ADHD can get SS benefits.

 

Why don't we just put aside the disability thing for a moment. Are you in favor of handcuffing young children in school as a form of discipline ?

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What is your definition of whipping a child, and when you "whip" a child what lesson do you think you're teaching them ?

 

That all conflicts can be solved by physical violence.

 

 

Why don't we just put aside the disability thing for a moment. Are you in favor of handcuffing young children in school as a form of discipline ?

 

 

Yes, my children got whippings, after I sent them to their room, after they had time to think about what they did, and I was no longer angry. And it was not physical violence. It was a consequence of something they did terribly wrong. Whippings were a rarity in my household, but sometimes whippings are necessary. I got whippings growing up. Stopped me from doing what I did wrong, and it stopped my children. I can count the times they were whipped.

 

And no, I would be livid if my child were put in handcuffs, but I would also be livid with the child resulting in being handcuffed.

 

ADHD is not an excuse to be totally unruly and out of control and violent.

 

That's just my opinion.

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When the kid is older he won't be a 54 pound third grader. There's no reason to put handcuffs on a kid that small. Not to mention is that even legal to put them on his upper arms like that? If this kid was in high school and acting out in that way then I could see handcuffs. I'm assuming the staff knew about this child's condition. I'm also assuming they have lots of kids in their school with disabilities. Have they not been trained how to deal with this type of thing? Because I know they have at my sons school. There are a ton of ways for kids to learn self control. Even covered by insurance in the way of therapy. Some kids don't learn by being overwhelmed and frightened. So many times these kids react better to calmness, I'm not saying everybody should remain calm while the kids punching out every kid in his class. I'm saying when you physically restrain a child like this what you are actually doing is escalating the situation in his mind. Making it less and less likely he's going to calm down on his own any time soon. People who are properly trained would know that. Yes, you should call mom. And have him removed ASAP. If a kid like this hurt my kid would I be pissed? Yes I would. Because he obviously wasn't removed before it was allowed to escalate. I would be a helluva lot more pissed if my child were handcuffed in the 3rd grade.Bottom line, every child is different. What works for one will not work for another. This is a subject I'm too emotionally invested in and I shouldn't have even commented at all. I will never agree that it's okay to put a third grader in handcuffs at school.

In my years of being a substitute teacher, I worked with special needs kids a lot. I preferred being with them, where most did not. Doesn't make me better or worse than anyone else, but that's where my heart was. I learned so much just from being there part time. Your comments are spot on. You are a knowledgeable, compassionate advocate, please don't ever stop voicing your opinion. :)

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Somebody help me understand.............are ADD and ADHD students now considered special needs students?

I dunno, low. My son was diagnosed with ADD when he was in the fifth grade. He graduated last year. He wasn't considered special needs and doesn't receive any kind of benefits. I wouldn't accept them even if he were eligible, he's not disabled. Maybe it depends on the severity of the condition. Maybe someone who knows more will chime in. I do know that it can be very complicated.

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Somebody help me understand.............are ADD and ADHD students now considered special needs students?

 

I thought I knew what a special needs student is.

 

They're all the same now?

 

 

All the same, is what is frustrating in your thinking, Lo!

 

Nothing, nobody, and no group of children are ever all the same.

 

Hell you can have special needs, just because you are special.

I dunno, low. My son was diagnosed with ADD when he was in the fifth grade. He graduated last year. He wasn't considered special needs and doesn't receive any kind of benefits. I wouldn't accept them even if he were eligible, he's not disabled. Maybe it depends on the severity of the condition. Maybe someone who knows more will chime in. I do know that it can be very complicated.

 

 

It does depend on the severity of how much a special needs child is considered in need, by authorities.

 

You would know if your child was in critical enough condition to get help from authorities.

 

Just don't call 911.

Edited by The Postman
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Somebody help me understand.............are ADD and ADHD students now considered special needs students?

 

I thought I knew what a special needs student is.

 

They're all the same now?

I'm pretty sure it depends on the severity. From what I have read it is very hard to get SSI for ADHD. I found this link.https://www.sharecare.com/health/add-adhd/is-adhd-a-disability

 

Special needs can be anywhere from ADHD to a child with terminal brain cancer. My son has 11 kids in his class and they are all very different with very different needs.

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I dunno, low. My son was diagnosed with ADD when he was in the fifth grade. He graduated last year. He wasn't considered special needs and doesn't receive any kind of benefits. I wouldn't accept them even if he were eligible, he's not disabled. Maybe it depends on the severity of the condition. Maybe someone who knows more will chime in. I do know that it can be very complicated.

 

 

Thanks, that's what I was thinking.

 

I just think it's wrong teaching a child with ADD/ADHD that they're disabled when they're not. My son and grandson had ADD, but never once did I teach them or infer that they were disabled. Reading and comprehension was just harder for them, and we practiced many hours reading. My grandson did attend Sylvan to get him grade current, and he did. But not once did I ever infer that he was disabled because he's not. He has more difficulity than others reading. But now he reads all the time. And so does my son.

.

I'm pretty sure it depends on the severity. From what I have read it is very hard to get SSI for ADHD. I found this link.https://www.sharecare.com/health/add-adhd/is-adhd-a-disability

 

Special needs can be anywhere from ADHD to a child with terminal brain cancer. My son has 11 kids in his class and they are all very different with very different needs.

 

 

Thank you.

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Thanks, that's what I was thinking.

 

I just think it's wrong teaching a child with ADD/ADHD that they're disabled when they're not. My son and grandson had ADD, but never once did I teach them or infer that they were disabled. Reading and comprehension was just harder for them, and we practiced many hours reading. My grandson did attend Sylvan to get him grade current, and he did. But not once did I ever infer that he was disabled because he's not. He has more difficulity than others reading. But now he reads all the time. And so does my son.

.

 

 

Thank you.

 

 

Just don't do this, Lo! I love you, and if it's your child I have a special love for he/she, too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CB4QFjAAahUKEwiA9M_y2Y_HAhWDdD4KHXVMDy8&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nj.com%2Fbergen%2Findex.ssf%2F2015%2F06%2Fmother_called_911_on_son_before_he_was_killed_by_p.html&ei=wNTAVYCUFYPp-QH1mL34Ag&usg=AFQjCNFIkAP9dQLNwwaG6GXYwJsHx9JUCA&sig2=Y5KRMcMax_AEdm43ZyLsZQ

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Yes, my children got whippings, after I sent them to their room, after they had time to think about what they did, and I was no longer angry. And it was not physical violence.

 

 

 

That's just my opinion.

 

Well we will just have to disagree on this. Whipping, and I assume we are not talking about a light slap on the rear, is by definition an act of violence. It's simply a way of beating a child into submission. It's kind of a shortcut to get a favorable result and one that a child will carry into adulthood.

Edited by CitizenCain
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Well we will just have to disagree on this. Whipping, and I assume we are not talking about a light slap on the rear, is by definition an act of violence. It's simply a way of beating a child into submission. It's kind of a shortcut to get a favorable result and one that a child will carry into adulthood.

 

 

Very true!

 

I didn't realize Lo felt that violence, and intimidation, is the way to raise children, CC!

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