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So the wife and I are like black-thumbs, I guess....plants come to die in our yard. Anyway, we've got a decent sized bed in front of our house that we've committed to redoing this spring. The wife insists that we need to have a plan rather than just going up to the store and buying whatever looks good (my preferred plan).

 

Is anyone into landscape design or just a green thumb with knowledge that may be able to come take a look and offer some sort of plan? I'd be happy to pay a "consulting fee" for any advice. I'd call a landscape company but really don't want to deal with a consult turning into a $10k upsell.

 

mrnn

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Hostas will grow well in areas that get quite a bit of shade. You probably want some color with them though. Here's a website that list a lot of different perennials you could plant that would do well. Remember you want balance when you plant them. Start in the back by planting your tallest plants first. Work you way down in height as you work your way to the front of the bed. If you plant Hostas you have to remember they can grow very large in diameter so leave yourself some space between them. I'd plant Hostas in the front. They will bloom in the Spring and look very nice when they do. Wildflowers will also work in your bed as well.

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If you want to do it once and done, Lost Mountain Nursery. Ask for the owner, Teena.

 

She did a pretty large area for us a number of years ago.......no muss no fuss. Most maintenance for us is replacing the pine straw. It looks good too.

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A word to the wise - if you plant hostas and any deer are nearby, they will be GONE in no time flat. Ditto impatiens (my favorite shade-loving annual).

I think that the standard impatiens are no longer. I've heard from a couple of "plant people" that their demise was due to a fungus.

 

They were my favorites too. :(

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A word to the wise - if you plant hostas and any deer are nearby, they will be GONE in no time flat. Ditto impatiens (my favorite shade-loving annual).

 

 

Hmmm makes note what to plant in the food plot next fall at the Hunting club.

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I just let the grass die and then I spray paint my dirt green twice a year.

Works like a charm.

 

I killed a cactus once. I was so embarrassed that I stuck a green pin cushion impaled with sewing needles inside a planter and just hoped nobody noticed.

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A word to the wise - if you plant hostas and any deer are nearby, they will be GONE in no time flat. Ditto impatiens (my favorite shade-loving annual).

We have a hosta garden and one year they were all eaten down to the ground!

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A word to the wise - if you plant hostas and any deer are nearby, they will be GONE in no time flat. Ditto impatiens (my favorite shade-loving annual).

I have a lot of deer that come into my yard all the time and they have left the hostas alone.

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I think that the standard impatiens are no longer. I've heard from a couple of "plant people" that their demise was due to a fungus.

 

They were my favorites too. :(

 

NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! Oh, that is truly horrible!!! I knew I hadn't seen any in awhile, but didn't think anything about it since I've not been able to plant anything for the last couple of years. :(

I have a lot of deer that come into my yard all the time and they have left the hostas alone.

 

Mebbe they don't like them yankee hostas. :D They sure like 'em in our neighborhood. Some poor dude planted a whole bank - 30 or more, I'm guessing...gone the next morning. Grew back some, gone.

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Thanks y'all. I spoke with Jenilyn's husband and he's going to drop by and take a look....which means my wife will be happy, which means I'll be happy, which means I owe Jenilyn and her husband big time!

 

Thanks!

 

mrnn

Maybe we can her husband to play golf with us!

Ohhhh, wait a minute, your meant you owe them something positive, never mind.

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I have a similar dilemma. We have a large area that is a slope that gets full sun and we are searching for a good, hearty plant that would be low maintenance and fill in well and help with erosion. Any ideas? We've looked at several plants but due to the size, it's getting pricey and not sure if we are looking in the right direction!

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I have a similar dilemma. We have a large area that is a slope that gets full sun and we are searching for a good, hearty plant that would be low maintenance and fill in well and help with erosion. Any ideas? We've looked at several plants but due to the size, it's getting pricey and not sure if we are looking in the right direction!

I have been propagating my Stelladoro lilies for years. They have been the only flowering plant that I have had success growing on a dry slope with a lot of tree roots. I started out planting six in an area with good soil and water so that they multiply quickly. Every year I cut away a plug around this time and divide it. You can put it in pots and let it mature a little before planting it in a bed. I have seen landscapers pair them with the knockout roses on sloped areas. It is a very pretty no maintenance grouping when they mulch it with pine straw.

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NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! Oh, that is truly horrible!!! I knew I hadn't seen any in awhile, but didn't think anything about it since I've not been able to plant anything for the last couple of years. :(

 

Mebbe they don't like them yankee hostas. :D They sure like 'em in our neighborhood. Some poor dude planted a whole bank - 30 or more, I'm guessing...gone the next morning. Grew back some, gone.

This is at my house in north GA where the Hostas are definitely GA grown and bred. LOL They might leave them alone because they are so close to the house and there's many other things for them to eat in the yard.

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I have a similar dilemma. We have a large area that is a slope that gets full sun and we are searching for a good, hearty plant that would be low maintenance and fill in well and help with erosion. Any ideas? We've looked at several plants but due to the size, it's getting pricey and not sure if we are looking in the right direction!

Kudzu would fill well and was brought over here to stop erosion. It grows about anywhere...

 

there are easy rules to remember for planting Kudzu:

 

CHOOSING A PLOT: Kudzu can be grown almost anywhere, so site selection is not the problem it is with some other finicky plants like strawberries. Although kudzu will grow quite well on cement, for best results you should select an area having at least some dirt. To avoid lawsuits, it is advisable to plant well away from your neighbor’s house, unless, of course, you don’t get along well with your neighbor anyway.

 

PREPARING THE SOIL: Go out and stomp on the soil for a while just to get its attention and to prepare it for kudzu.

 

DECIDING WHEN TO PLANT: Kudzu should always be planted at night. If kudzu is planted during daylight hours, angry neighbors might see you and begin throwing rocks at you.

 

SELECTING THE PROPER FERTILIZER: The best fertilizer I have discovered for kudzu is 40 weight non-detergent motor oil. Kudzu actually doesn’t need anything to help it grow, but the motor oil helps to prevent scraping the underside of the tender leaves then the kudzu starts its rapid growth. It also cuts down on friction and lessens the danger of fire when the kudzu really starts to move. Change oil once every thousand feet or every two weeks, whichever comes first.

 

MULCHING THE PLANTS: Contrary to what you may be told by the Extension Service, kudzu can profit from a good mulch. I have found that a heavy mulch for the young plants produces a hardier crop. For best results, as soon as the young shoots begin to appear, cover kudzu with concrete blocks. Although this causes a temporary setback, your kudzu will accept this mulch as a challenge and will reward you with redoubled determination in the long run.

 

ORGANIC OR CHEMICAL GARDENING: Kudzu is ideal for either the organic gardener or for those who prefer to use chemicals to ward off garden pests. Kudzu is oblivious to both chemicals and pests. Therefore, you can grow organically and let the pests get out of the way of the kudzu as best they can, or you can spray any commercial poison directly onto your crop.

Your decision depends on how much you personally enjoy killing bugs. The kudzu will not be affected either way.

 

CROP ROTATION: Many gardeners are understandably concerned that growing the same crop year after year will deplete the soil. If you desire to change from kudzu to some other plant next year, now is the time to begin preparations.

Right now, before the growing season has reached its peak, you should list your house and lot with a reputable real estate agent and begin making plans to move elsewhere. Your chances of selling will be better now then they will be later in the year, when it may be difficult for prospective buyer to realize that beneath those lush, green vines stands an adorable three-bedroom house.

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HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAA. That is hilarious, and so frickin' true!!! The only thing I can think of that might get rid of it for good is goats. Maybe cows, but better chance with goats. Even Round-up won't completely get rid of it. Kinda like the invasive privet and bamboo. Evil!!!

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HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAA. That is hilarious, and so frickin' true!!! The only thing I can think of that might get rid of it for good is goats. Maybe cows, but better chance with goats. Even Round-up won't completely get rid of it. Kinda like the invasive privet and bamboo. Evil!!!

Yeah but you know what really, really likes Kudzu? Snakes! :shudder:

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Ok, for those that want to garden, but have a large deer population, there is still hope.

They do not like Purple Ruffles Basil. If you plant that stuff around and among the plants you like, deer are far less likely to eat all your plants.

The basil looks really dark purple and looks great with Elephant Ears and Dusty Miller.

Deer are browsers and will normally walk on to find foliage they prefer.

The basil will reseed itself year after year, so you can dig it and move it back around the preferred plants. Also, the basil is easier to pull up than most weeds, so it also shades out some more hard to pull weeds.

You may also think I'm really crazy, but I also started putting corn out for the deer in an area that I could see from a window. They learned to go there to eat and would leave more plants to survive. After they ate corn for a little while, they seemed to get nervous about being in the same spot for a while and moved on. I did spend some on the bags of corn, but wasn't as expensive as my plants. Hostas, roses, pansies, iris, green beans, peanuts, watermelons, do get expensive. Especially when you look out, and have 7 deer in the garden.

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Nicely done on the kudzu recommendation, SG, LOL!

 

LPPT, Sounds pretty but we are looking for more of a complete ground cover. We may put in a few flowers here & there but mostly wanting something that will cover the hill & choke out the pasture grass. Hill is impossible to cut with a mower and my days of picking weeds are few and far between!

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HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAA. That is hilarious, and so frickin' true!!! The only thing I can think of that might get rid of it for good is goats. Maybe cows, but better chance with goats. Even Round-up won't completely get rid of it. Kinda like the invasive privet and bamboo. Evil!!!

 

It took a couple of years, but we finally killed it at my Dad and Mom's house by close mowing for a couple of years. It's tough stuff.

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You need plants that are shade to part sun tolerant. You want to "stage" your planting. Depending on size, one or two focal points. Plant larger shrubs to the rear and shorter in the front. Ground cover is acceptable as well. Planning ahead is key for perennials. Try to get some from a staggered bloom date so you can have season long variation and blossoms. Remember to allow for growth as you space and plant. A good base of mulch will go a long way to retaining moisture and blocking weeds. Since this is near a home use Cypress or hardwood mulch at the least. Cypress is a natural bug repellant while hardwood is not quite as appetizing to pests as pine.

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HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAA. That is hilarious, and so frickin' true!!! The only thing I can think of that might get rid of it for good is goats. Maybe cows, but better chance with goats. Even Round-up won't completely get rid of it. Kinda like the invasive privet and bamboo. Evil!!!

 

I've got a brown thumb also. I could kill kudzu.

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