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Jerame Reid Killed, In New Jersey, With His Hand Up.


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I saw that., yathink!

 

What are cops trying to do here in this country? Are they trying to lower our large prison population, which is the the highest in the world?

 

I saw something yesterday that made me think about reducing prison population in GA. I saw a prison van loaded with inmates and not a one had their seat belt on. My first thought was, "If they roll the van they might reduce the prison population by 15 inmates".

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Two cops, one white one black, black cop on the right killed him.

Both cops were wearing blue.

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Let it play out in the investigation. On the video it looks bad for the cops but WE can't see what they saw.

 

If "we can't see what they saw", imagine if there was no video recording at all. Just imagine... I truly hope that everyone and anyone who is willing to defend the indefensible gets a taste of their own medicine one day.

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If "we can't see what they saw", imagine if there was no video recording at all. Just imagine... I truly hope that everyone and anyone who is willing to defend the indefensible gets a taste of their own medicine one day.

 

Rush to judgment much? Is the investigation finished yet? Do you have all the evidence of what happened? No, you don't. So why not let the investigation get completed and then form an opinion based on the facts, not emotion.

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Oh kill off inmates on a van, great set of mind, almost like the thought process of at least a couple of those on the van.

 

You see people want their cake and be able to dish it out but don't think that they should have to eat it.

 

Been kind of screwed up if one had wrecked the van and killed a bunch of undercovers going to a prison to help an investigation against a ruthless killer. Maybe people don't think about the big picture and the chance that not everyone is a murdering rapist.

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Oh kill off inmates on a van, great set of mind, almost like the thought process of at least a couple of those on the van.You see people want their cake and be able to dish it out but don't think that they should have to eat it.Been kind of screwed up if one had wrecked the van and killed a bunch of undercovers going to a prison to help an investigation against a ruthless killer. Maybe people don't think about the big picture and the chance that not everyone is a murdering rapist.

Actually I thought just the opposite. You see there's been numerous Federal Advisories about vans rolling over and killing the occupants. Personally I think in the case of a rollover the drivers and any supervisors & or managers who turned their heads to this issue should be held accountable. When I drive, everyone buckles up or they get out. I can't control what others do, but I am accountable for what I do.

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I hear the officer almost begging the guy over and over not to move his hands. You can hear him yelling to his partner that he is moving his hands.

I assumed from that it was a warning to the other officer not to shoot but to be careful.

Almost every one of these I hear fear in the officers voice. How many times does this have to happen before these people understand to obey the officer, be docile, and straighten it out at the station not on the street.

 

I get that it goes against the grain of some to submit to the authority of the officer. So what, if you are doing nothing wrong it is 10 minutes of your life and you walk away alive.

 

This might also explain why the officer was so scared. we know he called the perp by name.

 

Reid, 36, had spent about 13 years in prison for shooting at New Jersey State Police troopers when he was a teenager. He was also arrested last year on charges including drug possession and obstruction; Days was one of the arresting officers then.

 

He should not have even been out of prison.

 

I hope someone can find one of these shootings of someone without an arrest record and not a thug well known to police.

I am not stupid, these thugs will do any and everything they can get away with and they do not want to go to prison for it.

The cops know this. They are going to fight to stay out of prison.

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I saw that., yathink!

 

What are cops trying to do here in this country? Are they trying to lower our large prison population, which is the the highest in the world?

 

Eddie's comment I placed in bold shows demonstrates to us his attitude and belief about police officers. He says cops, not some cops. This gives the indication he has placed all police officers into one category. In some of his previous posts he has said some cops are good, not most cops; again indicating he believes the majority of police officers are not good.

 

Now I'll address the prison population issue. Why is our prison population larger than most countries? Sure there's a lot of violence in our country, but look at how much of our prison population are repeat guests of the court system.

 

77 percent of felony defendants have at least one prior arrest and 69 percent have multiple prior arrests. 61 percent have at least one conviction and 49 percent have multiple convictions.

35 percent of those charged with felonies have 10 or more prior arrests and another 17 percent have between 5 to 9 arrests, thus 52 percent of charged felons have been arrested and before the courts many times.

40 percent of those charged with burglary and motor vehicle theft have 10 or more arrests. 30 percent of violent offenders have 10 or more prior arrests.

40 percent of all felony convictions serve time in a state prison and 55 percent of those convicted for violent felonies serve time in state prisons. More serve less than six months in county jails.

 

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Everybody know that all cops are not bad, Even I know there are a lot of good cops. I had a friend that was a real good person, and a good cop. Him and I got along really well, until he tried to sell me a gun he confiscated off someone.

 

There is a reason for the blue wall nobody knows about, until they need to look it up in the dictionary that is secretly passed around.

 

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As in American Sniper, there are sheep, wolves, and sheep dogs, I prefer to be the sheep dog, been one from the beginning and always will be. Laws are for everyone, unless you have diplomatic immunity, follow them or suffer the consequences.

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Rush to judgment much? Is the investigation finished yet? Do you have all the evidence of what happened? No, you don't. So why not let the investigation get completed and then form an opinion based on the facts, not emotion.

 

If history has taught us anything it has shown that the investigation will be for show only and that the outcome has already been decided.

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Eddie is so afraid of cops that when Pubby sent cops to check on him back in November I'm surprised he didn't respond in a way to get himself arrested.

 

 

Actually they didn't get in my face, even when I climbed down off a ladder and walked over to where they were, so I could hear what they were saying. I even showed them my ID, after they said Pubby (Pat), was concerned about not being able to reach me.

 

I still appreciate all my P.com friends, whether they think I do, or not. And I appreciate the good guys, Pubby sent to check on me.

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Everybody know that all cops are not bad, Even I know there are a lot of good cops. I had a friend that was a real good person, and a good cop. Him and I got along really well, until he tried to sell me a gun he confiscated off someone.

 

There is a reason for the blue wall nobody knows about, until they need to look it up in the dictionary that is secretly passed around.

 

 

The issue really that is being explored really is the 'coverup.' As citizens pay taxes for the police and their presence, their expectation is that what they've hired are adults who have, in the core of their souls, a sense of equity and justice but also the courage to sacrifice for that.

 

I think that the vast majority of police have that sense of equity and justice and they wince every time they see a fellow officer cross the line. However, from their first days on the job, they've seen a comrade - someone whom they would have to depend on in a sticky situation - cross the line and, since the issue wasn't that big a deal, they let it go. Depending on the culture of the individual department, they see this more and more often to the point that turning a blind eye becomes not just an individual habit but a sub-cultural expectation.

 

And that is the only way that I can explain how a person or even a large number of people who do have the courage to put their lives on the line in service to the public seem to wimp out when they observe the transgressions of the other officer and even, sometimes of themselves.

 

Now I'm the first to acknowledge that perfection eludes us all. But as 20/20 shows in the video Eddie posted, the willingness of Chicago police to ignore egregious actions by their fellow officers - presumably because of fear of retaliation by higher ups to protect long-time friends - is all too common (10,000+ complaints and 19 reprimands, most as minor as a week off with pay.)

 

That there are literally thousands of people in the streets seeking redress of grievances - something that ought to be taken as a bit unusual - pretty much ought to be a heads up that all is not right in Denmark.

 

The stonewall of coverups is being chipped away as surely as the face of that toddler whose face was blown away by a flash grenade in what proved to be an ill-considered militaristic police raid right here in Georgia.

 

pubby

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With hundreds of examples of misconduct being exposed seemingly every day on the internet, unless this is some sort of grand conspiracy you have to question this notion that it's just a few rogue cops causing the problems.

 

Hundreds every day? I doubt it. And even if there are hundreds every day, given the number of cops in this country the percentage would be tiny.

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Hundreds every day? I doubt it. And even if there are hundreds every day, given the number of cops in this country the percentage would be tiny.

 

Maybe so, maybe not. A simple youtube search using the term "Police Brutality" yields : About 364,000 results.

Using the same term "Police Brutality" for a google search yields : About 12,000,000 results (0.38 seconds)

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Maybe so, maybe not. A simple youtube search using the term "Police Brutality" yields : About 364,000 results.

Using the same term "Police Brutality" for a google search yields : About 12,000,000 results (0.38 seconds)

 

This may help you understand how the internet works and why those numbers mean nothing.

 

51BxVpiBaVL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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This may help you understand how the internet works and why those numbers mean nothing.

 

 

 

Thanks cp3o I will definitely check that out. In the meantime you might consider you .....

 

6351639973_555db09687_z.jpg

 

ps Did you ever figure out why people pay taxes ?

Edited by CitizenCain
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The issue really that is being explored really is the 'coverup.' As citizens pay taxes for the police and their presence, their expectation is that what they've hired are adults who have, in the core of their souls, a sense of equity and justice but also the courage to sacrifice for that.

 

I think that the vast majority of police have that sense of equity and justice and they wince every time they see a fellow officer cross the line. However, from their first days on the job, they've seen a comrade - someone whom they would have to depend on in a sticky situation - cross the line and, since the issue wasn't that big a deal, they let it go. Depending on the culture of the individual department, they see this more and more often to the point that turning a blind eye becomes not just an individual habit but a sub-cultural expectation.

 

And that is the only way that I can explain how a person or even a large number of people who do have the courage to put their lives on the line in service to the public seem to wimp out when they observe the transgressions of the other officer and even, sometimes of themselves.

 

Now I'm the first to acknowledge that perfection eludes us all. But as 20/20 shows in the video Eddie posted, the willingness of Chicago police to ignore egregious actions by their fellow officers - presumably because of fear of retaliation by higher ups to protect long-time friends - is all too common (10,000+ complaints and 19 reprimands, most as minor as a week off with pay.)

 

That there are literally thousands of people in the streets seeking redress of grievances - something that ought to be taken as a bit unusual - pretty much ought to be a heads up that all is not right in Denmark.

 

The stonewall of coverups is being chipped away as surely as the face of that toddler whose face was blown away by a flash grenade in what proved to be an ill-considered militaristic police raid right here in Georgia.

 

pubby

Can you explain how you know this?

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Can you explain how you know this?

 

 

The blue wall of silence, also blue code and blue shield, are terms used in the United States to denote the idea of an unwritten rule that exists among police officers not to report on a colleague's errors, misconducts, or crimes. If questioned about an incident of misconduct involving another officer (e.g. during the course of an official inquiry), while following the code, the officer being questioned would claim ignorance of another officer's wrongdoing.

 

It's just like science vs. religion. Mrs, J R! Some people just don't believe in reality, when it goes against their religion

Edited by The Postman
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Rush to judgment much? Is the investigation finished yet? Do you have all the evidence of what happened? No, you don't. So why not let the investigation get completed and then form an opinion based on the facts, not emotion.

The video is clear. The officer is not judge, jury and executioner no matter his prior history with the suspect. There was an investigation and a trial after Emmitt Till was killed. After being acquitted, the murderers admitted they killed him.

 

In September 1955, Bryant and Milam were acquitted of Till's kidnapping and murder. Protected against double jeopardy, Bryant and Milam publicly admitted in an interview with Look magazine that they killed Till.

 

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Proverbs 18:2

A fool has no delight in understanding, but that his heart may express itself.

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