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NOT looking for a referral, just information.

 

We need a power ventilator and an eave vent installed.

 

We have no idea who would do this type of work. Would it be something a roofer would do? HVAC? General repair person? We went to Lowe's and Home Depot and know what we need to do but hubby can't climb a ladder to do it so we need someone to do the work. We asked at Lowe's and Home Depot and nobody knew who you would call to do that either. The guys we talked to had done the work themselves.

 

Thanks. Again, not asking for a referral just an idea of what type of tradesman would do this.

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Basically, it needs to be a 'Roofer' to do this correctly, and an electrician for the wiring if you or the roofer is not handy with electricity.

That being said, try to find out from your homeowners insurance if they have a problem with power vents. When our homeowners replaced our roof due to hail damage, they ordered the roofers to remove all three power vents, and install 'Ridge vents' at Allstate's expense. The reason being, power vents are known to jamb up and start attic fires. In fact two of ours had in the past gotten birds stuck in them and had to be repaired.

 

Long story short, have a 'Roofer' install ridge vents, or unpowered roof vents, and the eave vents to aid with the draft,,, it's much safer!

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Agree with Paxilpappa

 

 

And yes, in most cases a powered vent is not the best answer. They do make your attic cooler, but they use electricity to do so. And they can be noisy and most don't last very long.

 

As a general rule; a continuous ridge vent and a minimum or R-30 insulation is the best way to go.

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Basically, it needs to be a 'Roofer' to do this correctly, and an electrician for the wiring if you or the roofer is not handy with electricity.

That being said, try to find out from your homeowners insurance if they have a problem with power vents. When our homeowners replaced our roof due to hail damage, they ordered the roofers to remove all three power vents, and install 'Ridge vents' at Allstate's expense. The reason being, power vents are known to jamb up and start attic fires. In fact two of ours had in the past gotten birds stuck in them and had to be repaired.

 

Long story short, have a 'Roofer' install ridge vents, or unpowered roof vents, and the eave vents to aid with the draft,,, it's much safer!

we have the ridge vent already. Roof was replaced after Hurricane Dennis, maybe even a couple of years after the hurricane. Not sure when the insulation was added but it seems as though the blown in insulation may be blocking the air flow.

 

We have no homeowners insurance to contact or to care.

 

The power vent we are looking at is solar powered and has no electrical wires. The power comes strictly from the sun. It's also a vent with louvers that open and close. Pretty cool actually. Seems to be a fairly new product. And it may be available here and not in the Atlanta area.

 

Thanks!!

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Agree with Paxilpappa

 

 

And yes, in most cases a powered vent is not the best answer. They do make your attic cooler, but they use electricity to do so. And they can be noisy and most don't last very long.

 

As a general rule; a continuous ridge vent and a minimum or R-30 insulation is the best way to go.

We have a good 6 inch layer of the pink insulation and then at least another 6 inches of blown in on top of it. You can see it even standing in the garage looking into the attic. It's that thick.

 

The powered vent would be at the opposite end of the house from our bedroom so noise wouldn't be a problem for us. The neighbor maybe but we have yet to see them open the window on that side of their house so it wouldn't likely bother them either.

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If you've already got a ridge vent, then the power vent will not work right. It'll just pull the air IN from the vent and not from the gable or cornice vents. Sounds to me like the inso. contractor covered or blocked the vents when blowing the attic. They make styro foam "troughs" that are about three feet long and go between the rafters to keep an open air space and keep the inso. from blocking existing cornice vents. They are a PAIN to put in after the fact, but can, and should be installed to keep air flow at a max. I Hope this helps.

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If you've already got a ridge vent, then the power vent will not work right. It'll just pull the air IN from the vent and not from the gable or cornice vents. Sounds to me like the inso. contractor covered or blocked the vents when blowing the attic. They make styro foam "troughs" that are about three feet long and go between the rafters to keep an open air space and keep the inso. from blocking existing cornice vents. They are a PAIN to put in after the fact, but can, and should be installed to keep air flow at a max. I Hope this helps.

This is correct. Adding a power fan will interrupt the natural chimney effect of the ridge vent.

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Sounds like we need a qualified roofer to come out and talk with us before we buy anything.

 

So, gable end vents maybe along with seeing if we can unblock the soffit vents?

Just the ridge vent and unblock the soffit vents. That will create a natural draft, or chimney effect in your attic. Hot air rises, etc. If you have gable vents, the air will pull through those instead of the soffit vents. Path of least resistance and all that.

 

And then be sure to have at least R-30 insulation. I put R-38 in mine. Georgia Power says that at that point, very little attic heat gets through to your house.

Check with your electric provider; they might be willing to do a free or almost free energy audit on your house. They are usually very knowledgeable in the subject.

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Agree with Paxilpappa

 

 

And yes, in most cases a powered vent is not the best answer. They do make your attic cooler, but they use electricity to do so. And they can be noisy and most don't last very long.

 

As a general rule; a continuous ridge vent and a minimum or R-30 insulation is the best way to go.

I had a power ventilator in my house in Powder Springs and I replaced the electric motor at least twice, if not three times, over a period of 10 years.

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I had a power ventilator in my house in Powder Springs and I replaced the electric motor at least twice, if not three times, over a period of 10 years.

Problem is, most of them are cheap junk. And they work in a hostile environment.

 

There's been a few catch on fire too.

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Just the ridge vent and unblock the soffit vents. That will create a natural draft, or chimney effect in your attic. Hot air rises, etc. If you have gable vents, the air will pull through those instead of the soffit vents. Path of least resistance and all that.

 

And then be sure to have at least R-30 insulation. I put R-38 in mine. Georgia Power says that at that point, very little attic heat gets through to your house.

Check with your electric provider; they might be willing to do a free or almost free energy audit on your house. They are usually very knowledgeable in the subject.

We got the ridge vent already and the soffit vents. We think they may be blocked by the blown in insulation in the attic. Not sure what R-rating a foot of insulation would be but I suspect we have enough insulation.

 

I keep meaning to call Gulf Power to do the energy audit. I did one online and it said to install energy efficient windows (which we have) and insulation (which we have). Oh, and a programmable thermostat, which we have.

 

Since we both feel the soffit vents may be blocked, that might be the best first step to take. And then eave vents. Ours is the only house on the street without them. We know the west facing double windows in three rooms don't help but they are the double pane, gas filled, insulated vinyl windows. And shatter proof. Really cool. They eliminate the need for covering the windows with plywood or storm shutters during a hurricane.

 

Roof was replaced in 2009 from the rafters up. Plywood decking is 3/4 inch plywood. Previous owner believed in overkill on some things. Hubby says that it appears as though in the past there was a power ventilator in the attic as there is an outlet up there.

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Problem is, most of them are cheap junk. And they work in a hostile environment.

 

There's been a few catch on fire too.

the one we're looking at has no electricity running to it. All solar powered. We have actually seen it. A cord runs from the solar panel to the motor of the fan. That's it. No power cord, no electricity needed. I understand that might totally eliminate the fire possibility but should make that possibility quite low.

 

The Lowe's employee we talked to had installed it on his house and verified that there was no power source needed other than the solar panel. We had seen the panels on a few houses around but didn't know what they were. Too small to operate a very large motor. They are about 16 x 20 inches, or the size of a picture frame.

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the one we're looking at has no electricity running to it. All solar powered. We have actually seen it. A cord runs from the solar panel to the motor of the fan. That's it. No power cord, no electricity needed. I understand that might totally eliminate the fire possibility but should make that possibility quite low.

 

The Lowe's employee we talked to had installed it on his house and verified that there was no power source needed other than the solar panel. We had seen the panels on a few houses around but didn't know what they were. Too small to operate a very large motor. They are about 16 x 20 inches, or the size of a picture frame.

They will still work against the draft effect that makes the ridge vent work.

 

Definitely need to make sure the soffit vents are open.

 

Depends on the type of insulation, but one foot usually gives you an R-value in the high twenties. Aren't you in Florida now? Recommended R-value there is 38-60.

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They will still work against the draft effect that makes the ridge vent work.

 

Definitely need to make sure the soffit vents are open.

 

Depends on the type of insulation, but one foot usually gives you an R-value in the high twenties. Aren't you in Florida now? Recommended R-value there is 38-60.

Yep, we're in Florida, about 25 miles east of Pensacola. I expect the R-value on the insulation is more than adequate. As I said, the previous owner believed in doing things right and sometimes over what is merely adequate. I seriously don't know how many inches of insulation we have but like I said earlier, you can stand in the garage, look up the ladder into the attic and see the insulation so there is plenty of it. Hubby said he had never seen so much insulation in a house. He really believes the soffit vents may be stopped up because the top layer of the insulation is blown in.

 

I'll let my hubby know that the fan doesn't look to be the way to go on this. I'll see if I can find the name of the roofer who installed the roof and get them out there to tell us what to do about the eave vents. There was no roofing permit pulled so I guess I'll have my husband talk to the neighbor who told us about the roof being installed and see if he might know the name of the company that did it. It sure is handy being able to see the permits issued. We had a problem with the generator and looked to see who installed it and gave them a call.

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we have the ridge vent already. Roof was replaced after Hurricane Dennis, maybe even a couple of years after the hurricane. Not sure when the insulation was added but it seems as though the blown in insulation may be blocking the air flow.

 

We have no homeowners insurance to contact or to care.

 

The power vent we are looking at is solar powered and has no electrical wires. The power comes strictly from the sun. It's also a vent with louvers that open and close. Pretty cool actually. Seems to be a fairly new product. And it may be available here and not in the Atlanta area.

 

Thanks!!

I can't believe you live in FL and have no homeowners insurance?? Doesn't that scare you to death? It would me. Even inland, you have the risk of some pretty bad flooding. A couple of years ago when PCB had 20+ inches in about 2 days on july 4th weekend, several folks I know had major flood damage. And that wasn't anything to do with a hurricane!!

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I can't believe you live in FL and have no homeowners insurance?? Doesn't that scare you to death? It would me. Even inland, you have the risk of some pretty bad flooding. A couple of years ago when PCB had 20+ inches in about 2 days on july 4th weekend, several folks I know had major flood damage. And that wasn't anything to do with a hurricane!!

We are on one of the highest points in the county, so there is virtually no flood chance for us. If we flood, the beaches and the 25 miles between us will be under water as would the farm land between us and Alabama. Even when we had that flood back in April, we were high and dry. Didn't even have water in the garage. The water just runs quickly downhill from here. The only issue we had was we had sand gather under the privacy fence but that happens with a rain of an inch. This house has withstood a number of hurricanes (Opal, Ivan, Dennis and getting brushed by Katrina, Rita and Wilma) with no major damage. We have no trees in the yard and none close enough to hit the house.

 

Our roof was installed very well and passed mitigation inspection with flying colors. Windows are impact resistant. We should get homeowners insurance and probably will in 2015. We have never seen such a sturdy house. It truly is built like a brick house.

 

We had carpet installed last week and the concrete slab didn't even have a water stain on it ANYWHERE in the house. Nothing. We were a little surprised.

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I talked with my husband about this and told him what Paxilpapa and Guard Dad said. He agrees and has decided also that the power ventilator is not the way to go. He is going to clean out the soffit vents as best he can and then have someone install two eave vents. We have such a slight pitch to the roof it would be next to impossible to have someone go in the attic and install any kind of barrier to keep the blown in insulation from stopping up the soffit vents. It's more of a crawl space up there than an attic.

 

He also said it appeared as though the previous owner had two power vents, one at each end of the house, on the back side. More than likely, when the roof was replaced they convinced him that he no longer needed power ventilators with the ridge vent. He said there is an outlet in both places the ventilators seem to have been. I remembered he said there was one up there but had forgotten about the second one.

 

Thanks guys. I appreciate the information.

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I can't believe you live in FL and have no homeowners insurance?? Doesn't that scare you to death? It would me. Even inland, you have the risk of some pretty bad flooding.

 

Homeowners is debatable, but Flood insurance in coastal Florida? It's either impossible to qualify for OR excessively prohibitive in price, and I mean jaw-dropping, heart-stopping prohibitive in any coastal areas.

 

 

 

Problem is, most of them are cheap junk. And they work in a hostile environment.

 

There's been a few catch on fire too.

 

And that's just the installers..

*rimshot*

Thanks, I'll be here until the New Year, be sure to tip your waiters.

 

 

 

 

Since we both feel the soffit vents may be blocked,

 

Easiest solution, leaf blower.

Walk around the house with the business end blowing up into the soffitt.

See if this improves the situation.

 

Secondly, depending on the age of the home, insulation compacts over time and loses R value, and it gets worse, it actually impedes the insulating properties of any new loose blown in insulation that's added on top of it.

 

I'm going to come out of left field and suggest looking up any insulating companies local to you, I assure you there's a trade in that there, and get several opinions from them on the situation.

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Homeowners is debatable, but Flood insurance in coastal Florida? It's either impossible to qualify for OR excessively prohibitive in price, and I mean jaw-dropping, heart-stopping prohibitive in any coastal areas.

 

 

 

 

And that's just the installers..

*rimshot*

Thanks, I'll be here until the New Year, be sure to tip your waiters.

 

 

 

 

 

Easiest solution, leaf blower.

Walk around the house with the business end blowing up into the soffitt.

See if this improves the situation.

 

Secondly, depending on the age of the home, insulation compacts over time and loses R value, and it gets worse, it actually impedes the insulating properties of any new loose blown in insulation that's added on top of it.

 

I'm going to come out of left field and suggest looking up any insulating companies local to you, I assure you there's a trade in that there, and get several opinions from them on the situation.

Fortunately, we are not coastal. We are inland, about 25 miles or so. North of I-10. We have been told several times and by several people that homeowners south of I-10 is unbelievably expensive. We priced homeowners and it was pretty reasonable actually. We just didn't have the money to get it at the time. And this year was the year of the new knees. Hopefully next year we can get homeowners insurance. We had never been without it until we moved here.

 

Hubby was thinking about the leaf blower!! He was going to give this a try next week. He wasn't sure it would work but sure would be worth a try.

 

The blown in insulation was done at the same time as the roof, we believe, which would make it roughly 5 years old. All the blown in insulation looks good and fluffy.

 

Yeah, several insulation contractors around here. Two things we have an abundance of around here are insulation contractors and landscapers.

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Homeowners is debatable, but Flood insurance in coastal Florida? It's either impossible to qualify for OR excessively prohibitive in price, and I mean jaw-dropping, heart-stopping prohibitive in any coastal areas.

The cost of flood insurance depends upon your flood risk (per Floodsmart.gov). Another factor is the age of your house. We live in a one year old, 2200 sq. ft. house about 1/4 mile from Tampa Bay. We are classified as "AE" for flood risk. I pay 900 per year for flood insurance. This covers my house and my garage (two separate buildings; therefore, two separate policies).

 

As you get higher in risk, your premiums go up. All you have to do is enter your address at:

 

https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/

Edited by ApolloBeachRetiree
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The cost of flood insurance depends upon your flood risk (per Floodsmart.gov). Another factor is the age of your house. We live in a one year old, 2200 sq. ft. house about 1/4 mile from Tampa Bay. We are classified as "AE" for flood risk. I pay 900 per year for flood insurance. This covers my house and my garage (two separate buildings; therefore, two separate policies).

 

As you get higher in risk, your premiums go up. All you have to do is enter your address at:

 

https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/

One big plus for us is the distance from Escambia Bay, Pensacola Bay and Blackwater Bay. We're a good distance from all of them, at least five miles from the closest one (Blackwater Bay). We're about two miles to Blackwater River and seriously, the entire town of Milton would be underwater before it would reach us. Our only flood risk would be if the roof blew off.

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One big plus for us is the distance from Escambia Bay, Pensacola Bay and Blackwater Bay. We're a good distance from all of them, at least five miles from the closest one (Blackwater Bay). We're about two miles to Blackwater River and seriously, the entire town of Milton would be underwater before it would reach us. Our only flood risk would be if the roof blew off.

 

Regular homeowners would probably cover that... their rule of thumb is, "From the top down, it's covered. From the bottom up, not covered"

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Regular homeowners would probably cover that... their rule of thumb is, "From the top down, it's covered. From the bottom up, not covered"

Yeah, we really don't need flood insurance except to cover broken pipes, overflowing toilets, overflowing washer or water heater.

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