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I've been working from home full-time now for 3-4 years. My employer has a satellite office downtown ATL but I'm the only one from my team here so I just work from home. I've been absent from the office so long that they recently stole my office workspace to give to someone else. While it's great in many aspects to work from home, work is becoming more of a chore than a career. This could be due to just being sick of my job (been there going on 14 years) or other things going on in my life, but I feel like a change of scenery could do wonders to getting some passion back for my work. By change of scenery, I mean getting out a couple times a week and working somewhere else. I know some folks pitch a tent at Starbucks and work from there, which is something I'm willing to try. Anyone else been in my shoes and found some interesting places to work around town?

 

And before I catch any grief, I know this is a first world problem. You really can't beat working from home but, believe me, it gets old...as I'm sure some other folks who have worked from home for a long time can attest to. Not old enough to spend over 10 hours a week commuting downtown again, but it gets very old.

 

mrnn

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I've been working from home full-time now for 3-4 years. My employer has a satellite office downtown ATL but I'm the only one from my team here so I just work from home. I've been absent from the office so long that they recently stole my office workspace to give to someone else. While it's great in many aspects to work from home, work is becoming more of a chore than a career. This could be due to just being sick of my job (been there going on 14 years) or other things going on in my life, but I feel like a change of scenery could do wonders to getting some passion back for my work. By change of scenery, I mean getting out a couple times a week and working somewhere else. I know some folks pitch a tent at Starbucks and work from there, which is something I'm willing to try. Anyone else been in my shoes and found some interesting places to work around town?

 

And before I catch any grief, I know this is a first world problem. You really can't beat working from home but, believe me, it gets old...as I'm sure some other folks who have worked from home for a long time can attest to. Not old enough to spend over 10 hours a week commuting downtown again, but it gets very old.

 

mrnn

 

How about a nice, quiet place like Barnes and Noble? Another idea is a local library. We don't have a Barnes and Noble down at the beach but when I need to do some work there, I will take my computer to the local library where I can get peace and quiet. I love my neighbors down there but they don't quite understand that I don't answer the door sometimes because I am actually working. :)

 

I understand what you are saying though because a change of scenery can certainly help that "stuck in a rut" kind of feeling you can sometimes get working from home. When I work from home for an extended period of time, I sort of feel cut off from the rest of the world.

 

Good luck to you!

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Of course they gave away your office. You have to realize that if you want to be more on the pulse of corporate USA you have to be in the thick of it and that would be in the city. The premise of working from home sounds great but the reality of it is, after a time, very limiting and it tends to spill over into everything.

Rat race vs not relevant. That sounds harsh but that's the way I think about it.

 

 

 

 

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I've been working from home full-time now for 3-4 years. My employer has a satellite office downtown ATL but I'm the only one from my team here so I just work from home. I've been absent from the office so long that they recently stole my office workspace to give to someone else. While it's great in many aspects to work from home, work is becoming more of a chore than a career. This could be due to just being sick of my job (been there going on 14 years) or other things going on in my life, but I feel like a change of scenery could do wonders to getting some passion back for my work. By change of scenery, I mean getting out a couple times a week and working somewhere else. I know some folks pitch a tent at Starbucks and work from there, which is something I'm willing to try. Anyone else been in my shoes and found some interesting places to work around town?

 

And before I catch any grief, I know this is a first world problem. You really can't beat working from home but, believe me, it gets old...as I'm sure some other folks who have worked from home for a long time can attest to. Not old enough to spend over 10 hours a week commuting downtown again, but it gets very old.

 

mrnn

 

I've been there, and in some ways still am there. I am now working from home with an engineering firm. However, before my career died some 7 or so years ago, I got into repairing mowers. I can tell you firsthand that staying at home and not getting out will turn you into a pumpkin pretty quick. When I changed my business to MOBILE it really changed my life. I HAD to get out and drive to my customers. Just getting OUT of your own house, for any reason, is imperative to maintain a happy life, as well as keeping a good social pipeline too. (Sorry folks, but FACEBOOK is not the way to actively be social). Face to face will always take first prize.

 

My suggestion to you would be to take ANY temp job, even a volunteer job (I find these to be the most rewarding) because it gets you outa the house and into the social fray. In the past, and to this day, I love to play piano for the elderly at nursing homes. It pays nothing in money, but it's high dollar in the feeling you get in return.

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Of course they gave away your office. You have to realize that if you want to be more on the pulse of corporate USA you have to be in the thick of it and that would be in the city. The premise of working from home sounds great but the reality of it is, after a time, very limiting and it tends to spill over into everything.

Rat race vs not relevant. That sounds harsh but that's the way I think about it.

 

I agree but I'm in a pretty unique position. My boss is in Tulsa, OK. I haven't seen him in a year and a half (typically once a year). Our group of about 15 folks is spread out all over the country with about half of us working from home while others are spread out at different corporate satellite offices. Working from home isn't hurting my career, per se, I am still very involved in the business and am leaned on heavily which keeps my name out there plus I'm regularly on conference calls/WebEx's/etc. Don't get me wrong, I agree that being in a corporate environment, in the office, keeps your office politics knife sharpened and helps to stand out from peers, but I have no peers here, nor any potentially available position that wouldn't be a lateral move. I'm saving nearly $300/mo on gas and $65/mo on parking, not to mention the minimum 10hrs/week that would be spent in my car that I'm instead spending with my family. I'm perfectly happy with having to telecommute and don't feel it's damaging professionally, I just need to find places around town that I can use to get the hell out of the house to work some days for my sanity :lol: .

 

mrnn

 

How about a nice, quiet place like Barnes and Noble? Another idea is a local library. We don't have a Barnes and Noble down at the beach but when I need to do some work there, I will take my computer to the local library where I can get peace and quiet. I love my neighbors down there but they don't quite understand that I don't answer the door sometimes because I am actually working. :)

 

I understand what you are saying though because a change of scenery can certainly help that "stuck in a rut" kind of feeling you can sometimes get working from home. When I work from home for an extended period of time, I sort of feel cut off from the rest of the world.

 

Good luck to you!

 

Library is a good idea. Thanks!

 

 

mrnn

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I've worked from home for almost 18 years. I completely understand what you're saying!! Starbucks, Barnes and Noble, the library, McDonalds - really any place with wifi.

 

Or, the other option - find something different to do in the evening - youth organization, church, working out - just something to break up the routine.

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I've worked from home for almost 18 years. I completely understand what you're saying!! Starbucks, Barnes and Noble, the library, McDonalds - really any place with wifi.

 

Or, the other option - find something different to do in the evening - youth organization, church, working out - just something to break up the routine.

 

;)

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I've worked from home for a little over 5 years now, but am lucky that I travel on average about 10 weeks a years. (sometimes a LOT more) The periods where I don't travel do tend to drive me crazy. I try to make sure I go out for lunch at least once a week just to see the outside world.

 

I've also joined a car repair ministry at our church that meets twice a month that has helped.

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You're absolutely correct when you say working at home gets old. I had a very difficult time with it. I'd find excuses not to do my work. I preferred going somewhere. My husband did it for 21 years and had it not been for the traveling he had to do for work, I don't think he could have worked from home all the time.

 

The idea of going to Starbucks is a good one. But you might try going to the park occasionally. I had a particularly difficult continuing education course to do and went to the park down by the river (here, not up there) and finished the course in record time. It was certainly more pleasant to read about payroll and taxes while watching the lazy river flow by than sitting at a desk or in my office, the dining room table.

 

And while it wouldn't take you somewhere else, try rearranging the office or your work area. Paint a wall, hang a picture, move the desk to where you can look at something different even if it's just a different wall.

 

I'd loved to been able to go to the gazebo in Dallas to work. I can't remember if there is a table there or not but certainly there are parks around with them. Try Sweetwater Creek Park. That's a beautiful place and they do have tables.

 

 

I've been working from home full-time now for 3-4 years. My employer has a satellite office downtown ATL but I'm the only one from my team here so I just work from home. I've been absent from the office so long that they recently stole my office workspace to give to someone else. While it's great in many aspects to work from home, work is becoming more of a chore than a career. This could be due to just being sick of my job (been there going on 14 years) or other things going on in my life, but I feel like a change of scenery could do wonders to getting some passion back for my work. By change of scenery, I mean getting out a couple times a week and working somewhere else. I know some folks pitch a tent at Starbucks and work from there, which is something I'm willing to try. Anyone else been in my shoes and found some interesting places to work around town?

 

And before I catch any grief, I know this is a first world problem. You really can't beat working from home but, believe me, it gets old...as I'm sure some other folks who have worked from home for a long time can attest to. Not old enough to spend over 10 hours a week commuting downtown again, but it gets very old.

 

mrnn

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I thought about this later - get a cellular hot spot - about $30 a month - that will give you the freedom to work where every you want. My new ipad (that is used) has cell capability and I keep debating on getting hot spot service for it. Haven't done it yet. But, I just might.

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I've only been working from home for a little over a year. I don't feel like I'm missing out on the corporate rat race for the fact that I don't really work in a corporate environment. I miss human interaction, I see my husband and kids daily, but some days that's the only people I see daily. I am starting to go a little stir crazy and look for excuses to get out of the house. My work doesn't really allow for being done at Starbucks or any public place. I have to have dual monitors since I do a lot of work both on our remote server and on my desktop. I'd feel a little silly setting up my desk in a public place. I am however thinking about joining a gym just to get out and do something for myself. I've been walking our country roads, but I think the drive into town might be good for me, and make me feel like I've got more structure. Weekdays I am rarely out of my pajamas other than when I go get my kids from daycare. I feel like going to the gym would at least get me up and moving and in public rather than sitting in my home office in the middle of nowhere.

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I work from home one day a week, occasionally 2. I would love to work everyday from home. I commute from Dallas to Dunwoody. My work is project driven so it is all about how well the project goes. I get so much more done at home and do not have to put up with all the office politics and back stabbing.

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I have been working from home since 1989. I go to my office in Decatur for about 3 hours one day a week. I also go to job sites as needed through the week so that kind of breaks up the monotony of being in my home office all the time. What I do from home is construction estimating. To be honest, I don't think I could do it from an office. Too many distractions.

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I've been working from home full-time now for 3-4 years. My employer has a satellite office downtown ATL but I'm the only one from my team here so I just work from home. I've been absent from the office so long that they recently stole my office workspace to give to someone else. While it's great in many aspects to work from home, work is becoming more of a chore than a career. This could be due to just being sick of my job (been there going on 14 years) or other things going on in my life, but I feel like a change of scenery could do wonders to getting some passion back for my work. By change of scenery, I mean getting out a couple times a week and working somewhere else. I know some folks pitch a tent at Starbucks and work from there, which is something I'm willing to try. Anyone else been in my shoes and found some interesting places to work around town?

 

And before I catch any grief, I know this is a first world problem. You really can't beat working from home but, believe me, it gets old...as I'm sure some other folks who have worked from home for a long time can attest to. Not old enough to spend over 10 hours a week commuting downtown again, but it gets very old.

 

mrnn

 

 

See now I'm just the opposite.

If I could get groceries delivered, I'd never leave the house.

I could totally be a hermit.

 

Of course they gave away your office. You have to realize that if you want to be more on the pulse of corporate USA you have to be in the thick of it and that would be in the city. The premise of working from home sounds great but the reality of it is, after a time, very limiting and it tends to spill over into everything.

Rat race vs not relevant. That sounds harsh but that's the way I think about it.

 

 

I don't find it limiting at all.

I do agree that if you work at home, it's very easy to be working all the time, so I have a firm schedule of what time I start work and what time I'm off work.

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See now I'm just the opposite.

If I could get groceries delivered, I'd never leave the house.

I could totally be a hermit.

 

 

 

 

I don't find it limiting at all.

I do agree that if you work at home, it's very easy to be working all the time, so I have a firm schedule of what time I start work and what time I'm off work.

 

That's been hard for me. Since I'm not in the office, and my office is in my home, when the company owner texts me at 6 pm on a Friday and asks me to get something out to a client instead of it waiting until Monday I have a hard time finding a reason not to do it. Although I know if I was in the office I never would have gotten that request.

 

But on the other hand I can leave in the middle of the day to take my daughter to a DR appointment, get my laundry done while I work, and not commute. So I guess you take the good with the bad.

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My home office is in my basement and is completely separate from the rest of the house.

 

I have worked from home about 8 years. My coworkers were annoying and was not getting any work done at the office because of cubicle hangers.

 

I love to work from home, I work about 42 hours a week and take hour long naps at lunch.

 

Whenever I feel the need to get out, I get out. Sometimes I ride my motorcycle at lunch, or go do errands after work.

 

 

 

 

One idea for you is to go work at a friends house one day who has wi fi. Once I worked outside on my back deck, but the birds singing was annoying everyone else on conference calls.

 

 

 

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