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Colorado Marijuana sales 67 milion tax revenue


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Colorado is selling marijuana for medical and rec purposes. So with a tax base of projected 67 million in 2014 why not have it in other states? Could we not have it here in Georgia?We could use the money right?

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Colorado is selling marijuana for medical and rec purposes. So with a tax base of projected 67 million in 2014 why not have it in other states? Could we not have it here in Georgia?We could use the money right?

 

 

Going through the tax procedure would cost hell out of the DA's office, in Douglasville, GA, Animal! Not only that, but many other DA's across this state, who haven't gotten caught with their hand in the drug money jar! :drinks:

Edited by The Postman
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Making it legal and regulated does so much good but the Bible Belt crowd will NEVER go for it.

 

1. As you mentioned the taxes.

2. By selling it legally you take the street value of the illegal down to next to nothing, reducing other crimes that are involved with it being sold.

3. Jobs. Now that it is legal you have to have people produce it in a legal manner, this means work.

 

As it has been proven over and over and over again that there is no more risk or health damaged associated with weed as there is with beer and wine there is ZERO reason not to leaglize it.

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Make my words, this is a bad thing for the US.

I know most here disagree, but trust me, in 20 years they will be saying the biggest problem among teenagers will be pot use.

If I am wrong, and still alive, then I will be happy to have been wrong.

If I am right, and still alive, then I will be saying "I told you so".

If I am right, and dead, then I will find a way to come back and say "I told you so".

(I like saying I told you so)

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Make my words, this is a bad thing for the US.

I know most here disagree, but trust me, in 20 years they will be saying the biggest problem among teenagers will be pot use.

If I am wrong, and still alive, then I will be happy to have been wrong.

If I am right, and still alive, then I will be saying "I told you so".

If I am right, and dead, then I will find a way to come back and say "I told you so".

(I like saying I told you so)

 

They have been saying that for the last 20 years LOL

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From what I've been reading all these stores in CO are bringing in anywhere from $50-$70 THOUSAND dollars per day since the first.

Fox news had a poll up yesterday asking if it "were Legal in your state" would you purchase for recreational consumption and the poll had hit somewhere in the %70+ yes range.

 

We aren't talking millions, nor billions, but this has potential to turn into a hundreds of billions of dollars a year industry here in the states.

 

Honestly if Georgia started talking about making it legal I'd damn well be one of the first to jump in on the ground floor to being able to print "green" money by the 1/4 bag.

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When you're buying from the black market or, in my case....over at a buddy's house and he tells you he has some $125/quarter dank bud for you try, which, despite the fact you haven't smoked in 10 years, you think must be great and so you pack the bowl full, fill the bong with a thick white smoke like you did "back in the day", pull the carb, inhale, nearly cough yourself into a seizure and soon find yourself balled up in a blanket shaking from a delightful mix of paranoia and anxiety.....you really have no idea what strain/type of weed you're smoking. If it were legalized in GA, I would atleast go and purchase a small bit to try out. My employer's headquarters are in the Denver area so I get to hear all about the weed shops there. You go in and the folks working at these shops are like weed connoisseurs. You can tell them what kind of high you're looking for and they will sell you the strain that will give you the desired results. I could walk in and say that I'm looking for a mellow, non-anxious, chill strain and they would give me the perfect indica that would have me sitting on the couch with some headphones on and a smile on my face without a trace of the paranoia that I would typically get from some sativa. If I were to have a local illegal dealer now in GA, I'd tell him what I'm looking for and that fool wouldn't have any idea what he's selling me, despite what he may claim he's selling me.

 

So yes, legalization would be a boon to this state. Folks like me who gave up on weed a long time ago but still have curiosity and/or some great experiences with marijuana would definitely purchase some for a special occasion or a night that you know the kids won't be home. It's a damn shame it'll likely be decades before we have that opportunity here in GA. We can only hope the almighty dollar forces the hands of our legislature and/or voters.

 

 

mrnn

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I saw an episode of this year's COPS recently and they were arresting some scumbag in TX for outstanding warrants and for some new charges.

While he was sitting in the police car, the crook started yelling, "When I get out of jail, I'm leaving TX for good!"

The cop asked him where he was going to go, the criminal's reply, "I'm going to Colorado!".

"Figures.", replied the cop.

 

Says a lot, doesn't it.

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January 1st recreational sales became legal in Colorado. Meanwhile across the country some guy has been murdered in a back alley because a drug deal went bad. A SWAT team has just kicked down the door and killed an elderly woman because they had the wrong street address. And an innocent couple waits by the roadside while a police dog searches their automobile.

Colorado's new law will not come without loss. The states DEA will suffer most. Surely they will miss those early morning raids, kicking down doors and shooting peoples dogs. Confiscating peoples homes and automobiles, humiliating people with street and cavity searches. And where will they get to sport those new armored personnel carriers and paramilitary uniforms ?

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e69p18CHa4Y

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiLhIyrbDL0

 

Edited by CitizenCain
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January 1st recreational sales became legal in Colorado. Meanwhile across the country some guy has been murdered in a back alley because a drug deal went bad. A SWAT team has just kicked down the door and killed an elderly woman because they had the wrong street address. And an innocent couple waits by the roadside while a police dog searches their automobile.

Colorado's new law will not come without loss. The states DEA will suffer most. Surely they will miss those early morning raids, kicking down doors and shooting peoples dogs. Confiscating peoples homes and automobiles, humiliating people with street and cavity searches. And where will they get to sport those new armored personnel carriers and paramilitary uniforms ?

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e69p18CHa4Y

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiLhIyrbDL0

 

Perhaps the meth heads can now get the attention they deserve???

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Perhaps the meth heads can now get the attention they deserve???

 

I'd personally like to see a portion of the tax money made from legalization spent on treatment for those on opiates/heroin as well as other real "hard" drugs.

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This is an interesting topic from an Ag perspective. Georgia has grown tobacco for decades and is increasing it's out put each year. Apparently the Chinese have a taste for American grown cured tobacco.

It would seem that GA, NC & SC would be able to supply those Western states and maybe the rest of the world. Does anyone know if the law in CO forbids importing from other states?

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This is an interesting topic from an Ag perspective. Georgia has grown tobacco for decades and is increasing it's out put each year. Apparently the Chinese have a taste for American grown cured tobacco.

It would seem that GA, NC & SC would be able to supply those Western states and maybe the rest of the world. Does anyone know if the law in CO forbids importing from other states?

 

I think you're suggesting that marijuana be grown in the tobacco states and sent to Colorado, but your post is kinda vague...

I'm not sure that federal interstate laws would allow shipping/transporting a drug that's not legal in all the states it would need to travel through.

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I think you're suggesting that marijuana be grown in the tobacco states and sent to Colorado, but your post is kinda vague...

I'm not sure that federal interstate laws would allow shipping/transporting a drug that's not legal in all the states it would need to travel through.

 

I am not suggesting it but I think it is the next logical question.

 

If the projections are correct, and that is a question yet to be answered, then demand in Colorado will soon outrun the supply. I would think that states like Georgia, North Carolina,etc. would be players in producing any kind of Ag products.

 

Just thinking out loud, but there is no border patrol between the southern states and Colorado (yet). You are correct about the federal interstate laws.

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I am not suggesting it but I think it is the next logical question.

 

If the projections are correct, and that is a question yet to be answered, then demand in Colorado will soon outrun the supply. I would think that states like Georgia, North Carolina,etc. would be players in producing any kind of Ag products.

 

Just thinking out loud, but there is no border patrol between the southern states and Colorado (yet). You are correct about the federal interstate laws.

 

It certainly makes sense that supply might outgrow demand, but that's the key to regulating product and prices. ;)

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I am not suggesting it but I think it is the next logical question.

 

If the projections are correct, and that is a question yet to be answered, then demand in Colorado will soon outrun the supply. I would think that states like Georgia, North Carolina,etc. would be players in producing any kind of Ag products.

 

Just thinking out loud, but there is no border patrol between the southern states and Colorado (yet). You are correct about the federal interstate laws.

 

Marijuana has already been California's biggest cash crop for the last 20 years and it's just around the corner from Colorado.

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If the people who run GA (as opposed to the citizens) believed in freemarket capitalism, we would have some of the greatest casinos in the world! So it's not a matter of Georgia meeting demand and putting Georgians to work - It's about a narrow ideology taking precedence over the public good. And that narrow ideology is not about to give way to the new paradigm of pot growing/production in GA. We just don't do progress here. It will happen eventually, but not until billions of revenue have been churned in other states and the nervous nellies here figure out that the production of marijuana is a positive, beneficial and politically advantageous move.

 

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Well there is an answer,make it legal.Give the choice to the people plain and simple. Tax it get the nation out of debt,people are going to smoke it if legal or illegal.Save money on the war on drugs and go after the hard core stuff.

 

Now with that said let's do it place it on a national vote come next election.:clapping:

 

 

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We need to legalize marijuana everywhere in this Country as well as open the door to growing hemp- which is a great crop for ethanol and grows in marginal soil. Paulding needs to be in on the ground floor of this if it is ever legalized. Another avenue for revenue for GA is porn. There is only one or two counties in CA where it is legal to produce porn, if we could start utilizing our film studio for that purpose- think of all the $$$$ our County could be raking in. Since we have all the pot and porn, might as well legalize prostitution and have and have some casinos too... Paulding could become better than Las Vegas!!!!

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I saw an episode of this year's COPS recently and they were arresting some scumbag in TX for outstanding warrants and for some new charges.

While he was sitting in the police car, the crook started yelling, "When I get out of jail, I'm leaving TX for good!"

The cop asked him where he was going to go, the criminal's reply, "I'm going to Colorado!".

"Figures.", replied the cop.

 

Says a lot, doesn't it.

 

It probably says much more that very likely some of the cops in the episode toked up after they got home a few hours after the filming.

 

One of the stupid things about prohibition (there are many other stupid aspects of prohibition) is that it makes good people into criminals. It's out there, has been, ain't going away, and the lies told about it make kids think the really bad drugs aren't that bad either because if folks lie to you about pot, they will probably lie about meth, krokodil, etc.

 

When I was a kid riding my bicycle (literally) to buy bootleg booze, that could only happen because it was illegal for ANYONE to buy alcohol in Paulding County.

 

Legal, taxed and regulated. Criminals and crooked politicians are enriched by prohibition. Society is hurt by prohibition.

 

BTW, don't put Texas up as an example of good public policy.

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I love TX as an example of how to handle criminals.

They run them through the death chamber like you are supposed to, fast and often.

 

Iran and Iraq do that too. Just as in Texas, a significant portion being not guilty of the charge they sentenced to death for...

 

I can't remember the Illinois Republican Governor's name, but he put a moratorium on executions when a task force found about 40% of death row convictions were bogus or seriously flawed.

 

Many countries that got rid of the death penalty long ago have much lower murder and general violent rates than we do.

 

What is that saying... an eye for an eye means a lot of blind people?

 

That being said, sometimes I wish some of these scumbags would die painfully. You know, like you saw the perp doing something horrible and were standing there ready to give a little instant karma...

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Iran and Iraq do that too. Just as in Texas, a significant portion being not guilty of the charge they sentenced to death for...

 

I can't remember the Illinois Republican Governor's name, but he put a moratorium on executions when a task force found about 40% of death row convictions were bogus or seriously flawed.

 

Many countries that got rid of the death penalty long ago have much lower murder and general violent rates than we do.

 

What is that saying... an eye for an eye means a lot of blind people?

 

That being said, sometimes I wish some of these scumbags would die painfully. You know, like you saw the perp doing something horrible and were standing there ready to give a little instant karma...

 

I do understand your point, but I am not one of those who wants to stop the death penalty because of it. (yes, I know all the arguments, I hear them from my wife every time I spout off on this topic)

I am also not against pot in general, I just see more problems coming down the road with it being legal.

I hope I am wrong about that, I would be very happy to be wrong.

But if I get a vote, my vote is no.

 

BTW, those who said back in the mid 70's that decriminalizing pot would lead to it becoming legal appear to have been right.

While those who were for the decriminalization and said (very loudly) that argument was crazy, appear to have been wrong.

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I do understand your point, but I am not one of those who wants to stop the death penalty because of it. (yes, I know all the arguments, I hear them from my wife every time I spout off on this topic)

I am also not against pot in general, I just see more problems coming down the road with it being legal.

I hope I am wrong about that, I would be very happy to be wrong.

But if I get a vote, my vote is no.

 

BTW, those who said back in the mid 70's that decriminalizing pot would lead to it becoming legal appear to have been right.

While those who were for the decriminalization and said (very loudly) that argument was crazy, appear to have been wrong.

 

 

What happen when alcohol was more criminalized, due to the Volstead Act, October 28, 1919 and January 16, 1920, stradial?

 

I suppose the counmtry became better off with that act. :drinks:

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Surprisingly the National Review a decidedly conservative magazine came out today in support of Colorado's new law and the legalization of marijuana. Calling for an end to the waste of taxpayers money and the assault on individual freedom.

The prohibition of marijuana, its editors argue, has led to "billions in enforcement costs, and hundreds of thousands of arrests each year, in a fruitless attempt to control a mostly benign drug."...

"We make a lot of criminals while preventing very little crime," the National Review writes, "and do a great deal of harm in the course of trying to prevent an activity that presents little if any harm in and of itself."

Legalization, the National Review says, is "a sign that Americans still recognize some limitations" on the reach of government.

http://news.yahoo.co...-161920924.html

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What happen when alcohol was more criminalized, due to the Volstead Act, October 28, 1919 and January 16, 1920, stradial?

 

I suppose the counmtry became better off with that act. :drinks:

 

The truth is that this country had major issues with alcohol related problems before the Volstead Act and it had major alcohol related problems after the repeal of the Volstead Act.

The issue with the Volstead Act was that you made something illegal that had been legal, something that people who did not have issues with alcohol related problems had done legally before the Volstead Act.

In fact, this is one of the major reasons for my not wanting pot to become legal.

Once you have legalized it, it is almost impossible to go backwards and make it illegal again.

I predict that once pot is made legal, other drugs that are currently illegal will be pushed to be made legal.

Not right away, but once again, it has been a slow ride (approx. 40 yrs) to make pot legal, just as was said in the mid 70's when the big push was to decriminalize it.

 

Again, I hope I am wrong about all of this.

I love being wrong about these kinds of things, because that means that things are better than I thought they would be.

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If I am still alive 20 years from now and having pot legal has not caused the problems I thought it would, I will buy everyone from today's pcom a toke.

I will not smoke with you or be around you when you smoke, smelling pot makes me nauseous, but I will pay for a toke for all.

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If I am still alive 20 years from now and having pot legal has not caused the problems I thought it would, I will buy everyone from today's pcom a toke.

I will not smoke with you or be around you when you smoke, smelling pot makes me nauseous, but I will pay for a toke for all.

I appreciate the offer, but I don't smoke. But who knows? In 20 years, I might take it up!

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Surprisingly the National Review a decidedly conservative magazine came out today in support of Colorado's new law and the legalization of marijuana. Calling for an end to the waste of taxpayers money and the assault on individual freedom.

The prohibition of marijuana, its editors argue, has led to "billions in enforcement costs, and hundreds of thousands of arrests each year, in a fruitless attempt to control a mostly benign drug."...

"We make a lot of criminals while preventing very little crime," the National Review writes, "and do a great deal of harm in the course of trying to prevent an activity that presents little if any harm in and of itself."

Legalization, the National Review says, is "a sign that Americans still recognize some limitations" on the reach of government.

http://news.yahoo.co...-161920924.html

 

I always found it interesting (to an extent, frustrating) that Libertarians would never find a way to have an impact on government because the system is rigged to just support two parties. The thought that they'd literally take over one of the two parties never even crossed my mind. Well done, libertarians...well done.

 

 

mrnn

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