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I loved this album . And I have it with the iconic picture on the front.

 

This was an interesting read about the album cover and a cool web cam located at Abbey Road.

 

 

http://www.abbeyroad.com/Crossing

 

 

Beatles_-_Abbey_Road.jpg

 

 

 

'Abbey Road' Cover Art: Strolling Back to Rock's Most Iconic Crosswalk

By Chris Willman

 

By Chris Willman | Stop The Presses! – 17 hours ago

 

 

Prior to 1969, if you had insisted that a crosswalk would go down in history, you might have found yourself in the crosshairs of a petition for institutionalization. But a casual photo shoot on the morning of August 8 of that year made an otherwise nondescript pedestrian walkway into the stuff of legend... and a peculiar destination for millions of tourists to come. It was 44 years ago this week that John, Paul, George, and Ringo put on their walking shoes — well, three out of the four of them, anyway — and stepped outside the Abbey Road Studios where they were recording Abbey Road to take a rather determined stroll across... Abbey Road.

 

A policeman briefly stopped traffic, so that there would be no need for a reenactment of Dustin Hoffman's "I'm walkin' here!" complaint from Midnight Cowboy. But although you might imagine such an iconic cover was art-directed to within an inch of its life, this was hardly an elaborate shoot. Standing on a stepladder, photographer Iain Macmillan took just a handful of shots of the band walking across the lane before the Fabs got back to work. In only one of them did all four Fabs appear to be strolling in symmetry, so it wasn't a tough choice.

 

And yet more has been read into this spontaneous image than perhaps any other album sleeve in history.

 

Now it's been 45 years, and that cover probably still sits in more frames than any other LP jacket. It doesn't hurt that about a third of all rock fans over the age of 40 would probably name Abbey Road their favorite album of all time regardless of what cover imagery it bore. But that textless image surely has a lot to do with how Abbey Road remains the top-selling vinyl album in America almost every year, even now. (In 2012, it was knocked out of the top spot by Jack White's Blunderbuss, after being the No. 1 LP for three consecutive years prior to that.)

 

 

 

 

Instead, McCartney, who was largely driving the creative bus in the band's last days, came up with a simpler and decidedly more local idea, drawing a sketch "with four little stick men crossing the zebra," studio historian Brian Southall recently recalled to the BBC.

 

 

 

A less iconic outtake that sold at auction In 1989, photographer Macmillan recalled the shoot for the Guardian: "I remember we hired a policeman to hold up traffic while I was up on the ladder taking the pictures. The whole idea, I must say, was Paul McCartney's. A few days before the shoot, he drew a sketch of how he imagined the cover, which we executed almost exactly that day. I took a couple of shots of the Beatles crossing Abbey Road one way. We let some of the traffic go by and then they walked across the road the other way, and I took a few more shots. The one eventually chosen for the cover was number five of six. It was the only one that had their legs in a perfect 'V' formation, which is what I wanted stylistically."

 

 

Paul was also the only one of the four to be leading with a different leg than the others — a sure sign that he was "out of step" by virtue of having shuffled off this mortal coil. And he was holding his cigarette with his right hand, even though he was a legendary lefty — easy proof of impostor-hood! John, in all-white, was clearly the minister at the funeral; Ringo, in black, a designated mourner, or maybe pallbearer (bands always make the drummer do the heavy lifting); jeans-clad George, obviously the grave digger. Paul himself was barefoot... and because some cultures bury their dead without shoes... could it have been any clearer, even if some people didn't also see a tell-tale skull embedded in the shadows of the back cover?

 

 

 

 

If there was any real symbolism at all in the cover, of course, it was that the chosen imagery did have the band walking away from the studio where they'd made virtually all their recordings. They were recording their final album together, and when they would do an overdub session for "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" three days later, it would mark the last time all four of them were ever in the studio together. (Three of them would reunite five months later, in January 1970, to do a bit of patch-up work for the Let It Be album.)

 

Paul wasn't dead, but the Beatles effectively were. So maybe this was a funeral procession after all.

 

 

Rest Of The Story

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I loved this album . And I have it with the iconic picture on the front.

 

This was an interesting read about the album cover and a cool web cam located at Abbey Road.

 

 

http://www.abbeyroad.com/Crossing

 

 

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2SByNLjAJA?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2SByNLjAJA?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

Beatles_-_Abbey_Road.jpg

 

 

 

'Abbey Road' Cover Art: Strolling Back to Rock's Most Iconic Crosswalk

By Chris Willman

 

By Chris Willman | Stop The Presses! – 17 hours ago

 

 

Prior to 1969, if you had insisted that a crosswalk would go down in history, you might have found yourself in the crosshairs of a petition for institutionalization. But a casual photo shoot on the morning of August 8 of that year made an otherwise nondescript pedestrian walkway into the stuff of legend... and a peculiar destination for millions of tourists to come. It was 44 years ago this week that John, Paul, George, and Ringo put on their walking shoes — well, three out of the four of them, anyway — and stepped outside the Abbey Road Studios where they were recording Abbey Road to take a rather determined stroll across... Abbey Road.

 

A policeman briefly stopped traffic, so that there would be no need for a reenactment of Dustin Hoffman's "I'm walkin' here!" complaint from Midnight Cowboy. But although you might imagine such an iconic cover was art-directed to within an inch of its life, this was hardly an elaborate shoot. Standing on a stepladder, photographer Iain Macmillan took just a handful of shots of the band walking across the lane before the Fabs got back to work. In only one of them did all four Fabs appear to be strolling in symmetry, so it wasn't a tough choice.

 

And yet more has been read into this spontaneous image than perhaps any other album sleeve in history.

 

Now it's been 45 years, and that cover probably still sits in more frames than any other LP jacket. It doesn't hurt that about a third of all rock fans over the age of 40 would probably name Abbey Road their favorite album of all time regardless of what cover imagery it bore. But that textless image surely has a lot to do with how Abbey Road remains the top-selling vinyl album in America almost every year, even now. (In 2012, it was knocked out of the top spot by Jack White's Blunderbuss, after being the No. 1 LP for three consecutive years prior to that.)

 

 

 

 

Instead, McCartney, who was largely driving the creative bus in the band's last days, came up with a simpler and decidedly more local idea, drawing a sketch "with four little stick men crossing the zebra," studio historian Brian Southall recently recalled to the BBC.

 

 

 

A less iconic outtake that sold at auction In 1989, photographer Macmillan recalled the shoot for the Guardian: "I remember we hired a policeman to hold up traffic while I was up on the ladder taking the pictures. The whole idea, I must say, was Paul McCartney's. A few days before the shoot, he drew a sketch of how he imagined the cover, which we executed almost exactly that day. I took a couple of shots of the Beatles crossing Abbey Road one way. We let some of the traffic go by and then they walked across the road the other way, and I took a few more shots. The one eventually chosen for the cover was number five of six. It was the only one that had their legs in a perfect 'V' formation, which is what I wanted stylistically."

 

 

Paul was also the only one of the four to be leading with a different leg than the others — a sure sign that he was "out of step" by virtue of having shuffled off this mortal coil. And he was holding his cigarette with his right hand, even though he was a legendary lefty — easy proof of impostor-hood! John, in all-white, was clearly the minister at the funeral; Ringo, in black, a designated mourner, or maybe pallbearer (bands always make the drummer do the heavy lifting); jeans-clad George, obviously the grave digger. Paul himself was barefoot... and because some cultures bury their dead without shoes... could it have been any clearer, even if some people didn't also see a tell-tale skull embedded in the shadows of the back cover?

 

 

 

 

If there was any real symbolism at all in the cover, of course, it was that the chosen imagery did have the band walking away from the studio where they'd made virtually all their recordings. They were recording their final album together, and when they would do an overdub session for "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" three days later, it would mark the last time all four of them were ever in the studio together. (Three of them would reunite five months later, in January 1970, to do a bit of patch-up work for the Let It Be album.)

 

Paul wasn't dead, but the Beatles effectively were. So maybe this was a funeral procession after all.

 

 

Rest Of The Story

There is indeed a camera at Abby Road. My niece took my sister to London and Paris for her 50th birthday in 2005 and at the time we still had dial up internet service. Well, my sister called to tell me about the camera and that they were going to go there at a certain time and to watch for them. I had the phone tied up for 4 hours looking for them and lo and behold, much later than planned, there they were as plain as day. OMG, it was soooo cool!!! And the best part was when they were waving at the camera, at me, I actually waved back excitedly like they could see me!! :wacko: :wacko: :lol: :lol:

Edited by momof 3
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I have the Abbey Road app on my IPad and it NEVER disappoints!!!!!! At almost any given hour, on any day, you can watch tourists and fans recreate the cover over and over again!! I have even seen a wedding party once!! Great app to download just to get a giggle!!

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So, interesting about Abbey Road.

 

It's actually in the middle of nowhereville in London. A very unassuming zebra crossing in a boring town, EXCEPT for the abundance of tourists that stop traffic in order to recreate the photo. There's not a pub, sandwich shop, nothing. Just the studios, which you can't get close to, a plaque to identify it and a bunch of people congregating and being too embarrassed to walk across.

 

You can tell it annoys the locals. However, if you want the best Beatles swag, there is a shop near the Underground station that has ANYTHING you can think of.

 

And yes, I took the picture...which reminds me, it needs framing.

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Thank you! I now have the app on my iPhone. I love webcams.

 

I often visit beach cams, wishing I was there.........

 

You are welcome low rider - from one Beatle fan to another!!! I love to rub this website in my hubby's face, he thinks the Beatles were "overrated". Many times during the day I just flash him a shot on this app and say " Over 40 Years Old!!!!" No other album can garner anything even close!!!

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You are welcome low rider - from one Beatle fan to another!!! I love to rub this website in my hubby's face, he thinks the Beatles were "overrated". Many times during the day I just flash him a shot on this app and say " Over 40 Years Old!!!!" No other album can garner anything even close!!!

I saw McCartney at Phillips Arena in 2005 and the concert was almost 3 hours without breaks and he hadn't played all of his hits. How many bands today can say that?

Edited by TJB
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