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Driving a scooter to work. Thoughts?


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I am currently looking at Google maps. I noticed an affordable way to purchase a scooter on Craigslist and found I am about 29.7 miles from work. Google maps does the distance walking and bicycling. What I am wondering is the very minimum sppeds for driving on some thoroughfares. The internet is kinda fuzzy on this one especially in Georgia. You definitely have to have a drivers license. I understand some of the safety risks involved. I just wondered about speed.

Edited by barrycdog
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depends if you go on the interstate.. scooters scare me on the interstate and can not keep up with all the crazy speeds the cars, trucks and motorcycles go.

 

We now live in Atlanta and hubby takes regular roads. I want to sell his truck and get home one but he will not hear of it. He said he would rather have a motorcycle but those are more expensive.

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depends if you go on the interstate.. scooters scare me on the interstate and can not keep up with all the crazy speeds the cars, trucks and motorcycles go.

 

We now live in Atlanta and hubby takes regular roads. I want to sell his truck and get home one but he will not hear of it. He said he would rather have a motorcycle but those are more expensive.

 

 

I would not try to even think of the interstate. I was hoping to pass through some less traveled routes.

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The interstates do have a minimum speed and based on my commute, I would NOT recommend,putting a scooter on one. I also thin a scooter could be dangerous on roads like 120 and 278 - you would likely get run over. I do, however, see scooters used in midtown Atlanta a lot, but never, ever on the interstate.

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My other concern is this crazy GA weather... I feel bad for scooter folks and motorcycle folks that get caught in those crazy monsoon "pop up" showers

 

Or the afterbeffectsbof those showers if the car next to you hits a puddle....

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"Scooter" is a very broad term. Some of them are not much different from some motorcycles and are perfectly good for driving "surface streets" throughout the area so you should be fine. In theory.

what scares me is wrecks... My friend's daughter had a wreck on one last month...The utility pole was not injured at all...however the girl and scooter was pretty bad banged up. The girl spent a few days in the hospital and the scooter is still in surgery

 

I need something around me.. airbags can be friends

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I've been driving a scooter to work for the past year and a half.

 

Like you, I have a 30 mile commute each way, so I wanted a vehicle that would save money on gas.

 

My scooter is an Aprilia Scarabeo 200. It is made by the Piaggio group, which makes the Vespa line. The Piaggio group is sort of like GM, with Vespa being like the Buick division, and Aprilia like the sports car division.

 

But, the bottom line is that you really shouldn't ride 30 miles to work on a 49cc scooter. If you go with a 150cc or larger, you will be able to drive on roads with speed limits of up to 55mph, and keep up with traffic. Top speed on a 150cc scooter is about 65mph.

 

A small scooter is OK for running around downtown on roads with speed limits of 35mph or lower, but for a 30 mile commute, you need something larger.

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Most scooters are not allowed on the interstates. They can't go fast enough. Not sure I'd want to use one for that long a commute either. I was thinking about getting one, but the commutes I am looking at are more like 5-6 miles in Paulding County.

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Once in NC, I saw a guy that weighed at least 400 lbs on a scooter.

Well, after I passed him I saw it was a scooter.

(from behind you couldn't tell what it was he was on, you just saw part of the back tire)

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Once in NC, I saw a guy that weighed at least 400 lbs on a scooter.

Well, after I passed him I saw it was a scooter.

(from behind you couldn't tell what it was he was on, you just saw part of the back tire)

 

 

Not nice!

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Not nice!

 

Your right. (it was however true and I wasn't trying to put the man down)

I probably should have added something like, after seeing that I decided not get a scooter.

(while I do not weigh 400 lbs, I am much shorter than my weight is supposed to be for)

(I think I should be a NBA player's height for my weight)

 

I promise, as a...let's just call it what it is...fat guy myself, I wasn't trying to make fun of the guy, but it was funny, just as it would be if I was on the scooter.

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Most scooters are not allowed on the interstates. They can't go fast enough. Not sure I'd want to use one for that long a commute either. I was thinking about getting one, but the commutes I am looking at are more like 5-6 miles in Paulding County.

 

Maxi scooters are made for interstate driving. Honda Silverwings, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW, and a few other models, are built to cruise at interstate speeds, and can top out at 120mph+.

 

Those models are more like touring motorcycles than the short wheelbase scooters with 10 inch wheels, though. Small scooters shouldn't be on any road where the speed limit exceeds 35 mph. They just don't have enough horsepower to compete with traffic.

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I had a 250cc that I bought when gas went over $4.- . I rode it year round for 2 1/2 years 33 miles each way from Hiram to Atlanta. I used it locally a lot for deliveries when we had our business. It got right at 70MPG and could get up to 75 while still feeling stable. I found a guy on Craigs drop shipping them and only marking them up $100, shipping was high but he was dropping them from a warehouse in Norcross. I picked it up in a crate, broke it out right there and tipped some dock workers $5 each to help me get it in my mini wan. I only paid $1,250 and this was 2006 but if you are not handy these China scooters can be junk so it may be worth paying a dealer some profit so you have what it known as value added service. Upon setting it up I read online and found the first thing you do is dump their fluids and replace them all. After that you take the carb. and gas tank off, clean those out and when I changed each fluid I flushed also. These things are assembled on dirt floor factories. Next I checked all my screws, nut and bolts to find many loose or so tight they were stripped. Once it was up and running life was good, if you do go cheap and get Chinese make sure you have good towing or a way to get it. I personally would look for a used Honda or decent brand name that is 5-10 years old, you will pay the same as a new Chinese scooter but in the end have a much better product. I know ride a Kawasaki Vulcan 900 and get right at 40MPG.

 

Once in NC, I saw a guy that weighed at least 400 lbs on a scooter.

Well, after I passed him I saw it was a scooter.

(from behind you couldn't tell what it was he was on, you just saw part of the back tire)

 

In the late 70's when gas went up we had a 400lb teacher that rode the old style scooter with peddles. From a distance it looked like he had wheels coming out of his rump.

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Most scooters are not allowed on the interstates. They can't go fast enough. Not sure I'd want to use one for that long a commute either. I was thinking about getting one, but the commutes I am looking at are more like 5-6 miles in Paulding County.

The law

 

50cc and below AND BELOW 35MPH- No class M lic or registration or insurance required. To summarize the rest of that law, no road that are marked over 35. Given on most 35 roads people do 50+, those things a suicide. You need a big motor when you need to get out of a cars way fast.

 

Above 50cc- Reg, ins, and a motorcycle lic is required. You start with a permit good for 6 months, you can ride alone but not on the highways or after dark. You can take a road test or go to a 2 day rider safety course to get your lic. .

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Unless you are driving downtown less than ten blocks do not attempt traffic on a scooter. It is not safe. Someone I know has a daughter who attends UGA and was recently ran over on her "scooter" in front of the campus. She has some pretty bad injuries.

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We're actually exploring this route ourselves. Like someone said earlier, anything over 49ccs requires a motorcycle license so keep that in mind. Scooters can range from little Vespa-looking things that putt along at 35 mph to 650cc Suzuki Bergman that can reach 90 easily and carry a passenger. We're leaning toward the Honda Forza, it's brand new this year and hasn't even been released to US stores yet. It's 300cc, so plenty of power for around town and even short bursts on the interstate. Most smaller scooters aren't good for the interstate because you can't get up to or maintain interstate speeds, and they're so light that the wind from other vehicles would blow them around. There's also a Honda CTX700, which is a 700cc motorcycle but it's an automatic so there's no shifting gears and clutch to worry about. As far as your license, you can either get your "M" learners permit the regular way (no driving at night, no interstate, no carrying a passenger) then get your regular "M" endorsement, or check some of the Harley dealerships that offer a safety and training course. You get the same tests and the added bonus of basic bike safety and learning how to ride safely. At the end of the course you have a written and road test that you must pass to get your "M" endorsement; all you have to do is take that to the DMV and get your license. Good luck and have fun with it! Oh, hubby's Harley Davidson Road King gets about 37 mpg and the Honda Forza gets about 68 mpg, so great gas mileage all around.

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We're actually exploring this route ourselves. Like someone said earlier, anything over 49ccs requires a motorcycle license so keep that in mind. Scooters can range from little Vespa-looking things that putt along at 35 mph to 650cc Suzuki Bergman that can reach 90 easily and carry a passenger. We're leaning toward the Honda Forza, it's brand new this year and hasn't even been released to US stores yet. It's 300cc, so plenty of power for around town and even short bursts on the interstate. Most smaller scooters aren't good for the interstate because you can't get up to or maintain interstate speeds, and they're so light that the wind from other vehicles would blow them around. There's also a Honda CTX700, which is a 700cc motorcycle but it's an automatic so there's no shifting gears and clutch to worry about. As far as your license, you can either get your "M" learners permit the regular way (no driving at night, no interstate, no carrying a passenger) then get your regular "M" endorsement, or check some of the Harley dealerships that offer a safety and training course. You get the same tests and the added bonus of basic bike safety and learning how to ride safely. At the end of the course you have a written and road test that you must pass to get your "M" endorsement; all you have to do is take that to the DMV and get your license. Good luck and have fun with it! Oh, hubby's Harley Davidson Road King gets about 37 mpg and the Honda Forza gets about 68 mpg, so great gas mileage all around.

You can save $100 and take the class at some local Tech schools on a Saturday and Sunday.

 

For a lot of tip see scootdawg.com

 

Here are two different vehicles that I am considering.

 

One has no top, while the other has no doors, and only three wheels.

 

 

 

 

Links to those?

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Above 50cc- Reg, ins, and a motorcycle lic is required. You start with a permit good for 6 months, you can ride alone but not on the highways interstates or after dark. You can take a road test or go to a 2 day rider safety course to get your lic. .

 

You can absolutely ride on a highway with a class M learners. You cannot ride on an interstate.

 

Another thing to add on a learners, you cannot ride a passenger.

 

As far as the other things that have been said... there are plenty of "scooters" that are more than interstate capable, as someone stated.

Some of the bigger scooters are 650's and are just as capable at interstate speeds as a regular motorcycle of the same class.

 

I've been a motorcyclist for a LONG time.. I was an MSF instructor for several years and I have just recently decided to call it quits.

It's fun, it saves a good bit of money, insurance is relatively cheap, but the world is becoming more and more dangerous

and more and more idiots are out there sharing the roads with you.

People are much less safe and less considerate and it's getting worse every year.

 

If you get a scooter, I suggest taking a rider course, if you haven't before.

It will teach you a LOT of things that you probably don't know.

I've seen a lot of people who ride and have thought "I've been riding for years... I don't need a course" who have broken down and taken the course

and ended up promoting the course and saying, "Wow, I never thought about that... " or "Wow, that is a really good thing to know..."

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There are several that go all the way down the EW connector every day. I am amazed that they have not been ran over. They putt along, on the edge of the road (but not far enough over so you could pass them), and have traffic backed up behind them FOREVER!!

 

Sometimes i think they actually go slower just on purpose!!

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You can save $100 and take the class at some local Tech schools on a Saturday and Sunday.

 

For a lot of tip see scootdawg.com

 

 

 

 

Links to those?

 

 

The Scootdawg.com message board has been shut down. The replacement scooter message board is itistheride.boards.net.

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