Jump to content
Paulding.com
Sign in to follow this  
GACat

Parents buying "required" school supplies

Recommended Posts

As a tax preparer with almost 20 yeas experience, I agree with you. Especially when college expenses can be deducted. Maybe a flat amount, such as educators receive for supplies they purchase.

 

Then again, Congress and the IRS did not ask for my input on what should and should not be deductible.

 

Yes, the tax holiday is August 9 and 10th this year. Amazing at some of the things that are exempt! I mean really, why are DIAPERS on the list? blink.gif

 

I just found the PDF list (sorry, I couldn't seem to make it create a link to post) and computer-related items will be tax-exempt. That sounds like a good time to pick up the stuff I've been needing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't get this whole "lazy parent" thing. It takes more effort to drive your child to school than it does to get up, put on a robe and stand on the front porch while they catch the bus. Then you can go back to bed, like I do. Now that's lazy. :lol:

Frankly I don't get the label either. I was quoting the other poster who was referring to lazy parents, not making my own observation of other people in general. I know some lazy parents but to assume that people in the car rider lane were lazy and didn't want to get up is beyond my comprehension. That's a lot of people to make assumptions about and I don't know the majority of those people. Oh well, maybe the other poster does know them personally and can give all of us a percentage of how many parents have valid reasons for driving their kids to school vs. what the percentage of lazy, oversleeping, traffic creating parents there at at any given school on any given day. Maybe the Postman can make us a chart or a graph to illustrate the issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly!! Ink cartridges are tax exempt! WHOO HOO!!

I just found the PDF list (sorry, I couldn't seem to make it create a link to post) and computer-related items will be tax-exempt. That sounds like a good time to pick up the stuff I've been needing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankly I don't get the label either. I was quoting the other poster who was referring to lazy parents, not making my own observation of other people in general. I know some lazy parents but to assume that people in the car rider lane were lazy and didn't want to get up is beyond my comprehension. That's a lot of people to make assumptions about and I don't know the majority of those people. Oh well, maybe the other poster does know them personally and can give all of us a percentage of how many parents have valid reasons for driving their kids to school vs. what the percentage of lazy, oversleeping, traffic creating parents there at at any given school on any given day. Maybe the Postman can make us a chart or a graph to illustrate the issue.

It's beyond mine too. How is it lazy to get up, get your child up, feed them breakfast, make sure they are ready and prepared on time, walk to the car, get in, buckle up, start the car, back out of the garage, drive to school, wait in the car rider line, wait in the traffic to return home, drive back home, park the car, and walk up the stairs when you get there? That's lazier than putting them on the bus and walking back into the house? Wow, the word 'lazy' must mean different things to different people.

 

I've always driven my kids to school, my grown daughters, 26 and 28, never rode the bus and didn't want to. Middleschooler has always been a car rider but wants to ride the bus this year. He sees it as an adventure and Hubby says I have no choice and we have to let him try it. I HATE the fact that they don't have seat belts and I swear I've never heard of ANY GOOD BEHAVIOR stories about buses. I like seeing him into school in the mornings and I like to see him come out in the afternoon. So, we're making a compromise, he'll ride in the car in the morning and can be a bus rider in the afternoon. If all goes well, I'll let him ride in the mornings too, eventually.

 

Honestly, I know in my heart he'll be fine, but the idea that I'm turning over something I've always done to someone else, completely freaks me out. And for the record, I admire anyone who drives a bus because I wouldn't do it for all the tea in China.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, for those who have a problem with community supplies I am trying to train them young to be responsible! I teach four year old pre-k and I label every single marker with the child's name. They have their own school box with their name on it and they keep their crayons and their scissors with their name written on them in that box. I buy extras to put in the art cart that everyone can use. So when I find a marker with no lid languishing under the table I can tell Bobby or Suzie that they won't have a red to color Rudolph's nose come Christmas time if they don't snap that cap and put it up!!

 

I do specify Crayola brand crayons, .50 a box, and Crayola WASHABLE Classic color makers on my supply list. I got tired of getting grief for ruined shirts when my little friends colored on themselves with regular marker. And the classic color request is simply because those new neon and tropical packs don't cut it when you need primary colors. My kiddos do well with sharing though AND with being personally responsible for their own supplies. Off brand glue sticks are the bane of my teaching world! A lot of them just will not stick stuff together.

 

And the request for coffee filters could be for an art project, you can use them to wipe dry-erase boards, put small amounts of a snack on, etc. I doubt the teachers actually request them for personal coffee use. We stock our own coffee cabinet at my school. But a disclaimer that I do teach at a private school so things are definitely different than public school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's beyond mine too. How is it lazy to get up, get your child up, feed them breakfast, make sure they are ready and prepared on time, walk to the car, get in, buckle up, start the car, back out of the garage, drive to school, wait in the car rider line, wait in the traffic to return home, drive back home, park the car, and walk up the stairs when you get there? That's lazier than putting them on the bus and walking back into the house? Wow, the word 'lazy' must mean different things to different people.

 

I've always driven my kids to school, my grown daughters, 26 and 28, never rode the bus and didn't want to. Middleschooler has always been a car rider but wants to ride the bus this year. He sees it as an adventure and Hubby says I have no choice and we have to let him try it. I HATE the fact that they don't have seat belts and I swear I've never heard of ANY GOOD BEHAVIOR stories about buses. I like seeing him into school in the mornings and I like to see him come out in the afternoon. So, we're making a compromise, he'll ride in the car in the morning and can be a bus rider in the afternoon. If all goes well, I'll let him ride in the mornings too, eventually.

 

Honestly, I know in my heart he'll be fine, but the idea that I'm turning over something I've always done to someone else, completely freaks me out. And for the record, I admire anyone who drives a bus because I wouldn't do it for all the tea in China.

 

All 3 of mine were/have been car riders (there was one year that we lived across the street from the school) until THEY decided that they wanted to ride the bus. I tend to pick my battles, and riding the bus would not be one of them.

13yr old is in a club that meets on Friday mornings, I take him on that day.

 

As far as the pencils, we went through that when, now 13yr old was in elementary school. It has something to do with fine motor skills, and is easier for the kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All 3 of mine were/have been car riders (there was one year that we lived across the street from the school) until THEY decided that they wanted to ride the bus. I tend to pick my battles, and riding the bus would not be one of them.

13yr old is in a club that meets on Friday mornings, I take him on that day.

 

As far as the pencils, we went through that when, now 13yr old was in elementary school. It has something to do with fine motor skills, and is easier for the kids.

I'm about to date myself for sure, but didn't K and 1st grade used to use big fat pencils? It seems like they were either blue, red or green with a big red eraser?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've bought the Dixon pencils in the past, and other brands, but I have to say, the Ticonderoga pencils are so much better. With other brands, the kids would sharpen them, and the graphite would break off up inside the hole. Then they'd have to sharpen them all over again. Never had that problem with the Ticonderogas. They're more expensive, but way more durable.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, if the school system pays that much for buses, mechanics, bus drivers, etc then those new lanes on the street to accommodate all the cars which come to pick up and drop off the kids shouldn't be necessary. Charge a fee to drop off the little princess instead of putting her on a bus. Seems wrong for the taxpayers to foot the bill for the buses AND the turn lane.

 

Never have figured out how a crystal chandelier, marble floors and artificial turf contribute to a child's quality basic education especially when the percentage of students going into college have to take remedial courses the first year (and which is why now a college education is obtained in five years instead of four). Maybe putting the money for those glitzy things toward teacher salaries and classroom supplies would be a better idea. Call me crazy. wacko.gif I do know that my family members who are or have been teachers and administrators are frustrated by it as well.

 

 

I'm sorry you feel this way. But for us that only have one car that our husband HAS to use to get to work everyday for my little angel's to eat. I'm Very bless that we can have BUSES to pick up my little angle's. I'm happy to send in more when I can. Have you not seen gas prices for the buses to run?, or the price food for my little angle's to eat. So yeah I can see why they as for help. IMO...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about to date myself for sure, but didn't K and 1st grade used to use big fat pencils? It seems like they were either blue, red or green with a big red eraser?????

 

We used chisels on rocks.

 

(think Flintstones)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about to date myself for sure, but didn't K and 1st grade used to use big fat pencils? It seems like they were either blue, red or green with a big red eraser?????

 

Yes, I'm not sure when that changed. When the two older ones started school it was the fat pencils. That was in the 80's. Then when youngest started 8yrs ago, I thought it strange that they changed. :pardon:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've bought the Dixon pencils in the past, and other brands, but I have to say, the Ticonderoga pencils are so much better. With other brands, the kids would sharpen them, and the graphite would break off up inside the hole. Then they'd have to sharpen them all over again. Never had that problem with the Ticonderogas. They're more expensive, but way more durable.

 

Seems like these pencils have started to become the norm now. They were "new" when my youngest was having problems with his writing. Keep in mind he is now in the 8th grade. Maybe they saw enough benefit with the kids that had problems, that the teachers figured the "new" style pencils were better. :pardon:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would this be different than charging a parking fee that is collected at a high school? Call it a drop off fee.

And yes, it is fair because if these parents are tying up traffic and requiring another lane to be added to the street, those are the people who should be paying for it, not the overburdened tax payers of the county many of whom may not EVER drive on that street. Let the lazy parent as well as the one who has good reason pay for the ability to drop off their child. The bus is provided to get the child from home to school and back.

 

I don't use the Paulding County Schools - can I get my money back? And, I've been blessed to never had to use the fire dept. - can I get that money too? There are several roads in Paulding that I don't drive on - why should I have to maintain those?

 

Oh yeah, that's because I made a choice to be a homeowner in Paulding County and accept the fact that the officials elected in this county would be the ones in charge of spending my money wisely. If they don't, I don't get a refund, I get the opportunity to vote for someone else or I can move... That's it. We have officials that make the decisions based on what they believe is in our county and schools best interests. In the same vein, we trust our teachers to determine what works best in their classroom. If they need parents to help, then we should be willing to do the best we can to make that happen.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread was on my mind at Sam's today....got my daughter a box of 900 baby wipes and a gallon of hand sanitizer :lol:

 

mrnn

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread was on my mind at Sam's today....got my daughter a box of 900 baby wipes and a gallon of hand sanitizer :lol:

 

mrnn

 

What about the rest of the class? Lol

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a child in a Cobb County school and haven't since 1999 but yet until THIS year I paid property taxes on two pieces of property. Seems the county could better manage the money they have instead of asking parents and taxpayers for more. Stop the marble floors in schools, stop installing chandeliers, use the money for what matters--educating the children. With the amount of money the schools receive there should be NO need for parents to send items for classroom use. NONE. That's MY problem with the school system and the supply list. Taxpayers PAY for that stuff. They shouldn't have to pay for it a second time because the school board decides to approve glitzy school projects. That money should go to educators and for materials. I have yet to figure out how a marble floor helps a child learn.

I don't use the Paulding County Schools - can I get my money back? And, I've been blessed to never had to use the fire dept. - can I get that money too? There are several roads in Paulding that I don't drive on - why should I have to maintain those?

 

Oh yeah, that's because I made a choice to be a homeowner in Paulding County and accept the fact that the officials elected in this county would be the ones in charge of spending my money wisely. If they don't, I don't get a refund, I get the opportunity to vote for someone else or I can move... That's it. We have officials that make the decisions based on what they believe is in our county and schools best interests. In the same vein, we trust our teachers to determine what works best in their classroom. If they need parents to help, then we should be willing to do the best we can to make that happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a child in a Cobb County school and haven't since 1999 but yet until THIS year I paid property taxes on two pieces of property. Seems the county could better manage the money they have instead of asking parents and taxpayers for more. Stop the marble floors in schools, stop installing chandeliers, use the money for what matters--educating the children. With the amount of money the schools receive there should be NO need for parents to send items for classroom use. NONE. That's MY problem with the school system and the supply list. Taxpayers PAY for that stuff. They shouldn't have to pay for it a second time because the school board decides to approve glitzy school projects. That money should go to educators and for materials. I have yet to figure out how a marble floor helps a child learn.

 

 

Maybe marble is more durable and lasts longer than wood or tile? I just know that when money comes it, it is usually designated by other agencies for a specific purpose and for that purpose only. It may be there just isn't enough in the budget to go around to cover the cost of supplies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The jug of clorox wipes that are asked for are WAY cheaper than the doctor's visit and the medicine when your kid gets sick.

2. Washable markers (and really, Crayola washables are the only ones that are truly washable) saved me hundreds of dollars in ruined clothes.

3. Off brand crayons are awful - they break more easily and are used up more quickly - so, by buying the more expensive crayolas, you're saving money in the long run.

4. Most teachers put the crayons up - not to give them out communally - but so that you buy them when they are cheaper (that 25 cent pack of crayons now will be almost $2 in January). They don't want their names on the crayons because then they'd have to dig through the cabinet to find the right box.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not a lack of support for teachers, it's a lack of support for the parents who won't step up, and then it leads the teacher to be the one begging for supplies.

 

The list that is posted states a backpack, and lunch box. Why would I provide someone else's kid those two items? Is Cobb Co. going to start asking for all parents to start providing school clothes as well?

 

 

Most *reasonable* people reading that list would be able to discern that the backpack/lunch box are NOT shareable items. Does someone really think that the kid is going to come home with someone elses' backpack every day? tongue.gif

 

For what it's worth, I am a teacher, and yet I am always sending in extra supplies/money/donations to my OWN kids' classrooms for the kids whose parents can't/don't. To me, it is more important that the child has what they need, than being indignant that the parent isn't able/willing to do so themselves. These kids didn't ask for the life they were brought into, and if I can help them in some way, then I'll always be willing to do so. It makes me sad to think that I would ever be so jaded as to feel differently. huh.gif

 

Ironically (or not, depending on your perspective), whenever I have asked for donations from my classes, most of them come from kids of teachers.

Edited by shoes116
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used chisels on rocks.

 

(think Flintstones)

That's what Hubby tells people I still use, along with my abacus for math. In other words, I tend to fight against technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what Hubby tells people I still use, along with my abacus for math. In other words, I tend to fight against technology.

 

:drinks:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most *reasonable* people reading that list would be able to discern that the backpack/lunch box are NOT shareable items. Does someone really think that the kid is going to come home with someone elses' backpack every day? tongue.gif I was being a smartalec.

 

For what it's worth, I am a teacher, and yet I am always sending in extra supplies/money/donations to my OWN kids' classrooms for the kids whose parents can't/don't. To me, it is more important that the child has what they need, than being indignant that the parent isn't able/willing to do so themselves. These kids didn't ask for the life they were brought into, and if I can help them in some way, then I'll always be willing to do so. It makes me sad to think that I would ever be so jaded as to feel differently. huh.gif

 

Ironically (or not, depending on your perspective), whenever I have asked for donations from my classes, most of them come from kids of teachers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GoGators-- Well, around here you never quite know when someone is being sarcastic or they're just batcrap crazy drinks.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few observations.

 

Marble floors in a county building, bad. Too expensive and showy, a total waste of taxpayers money.

Marble floors in a school, good. Durable (which is not true) and a good choice.

 

Buying classroom supplies, good.

Letting your kids ride to school on the bus with those kids in his/her classroom, bad.

 

Younger people have no problem with mandating that parents provide CLASSROOM supplies that the school system should pay for.

Older people have a BIG problem with mandating that parents provide CLASSROOM supplies that the school system should pay for.

 

 

I actually saw a supply list that said what COLOR folders for which subject the kid needed. That's going a bit far, IMO. If a kid wants all red folders, let him get all red folders. If a kid wants all Power Rangers folders, let her them get. As long as they have what's needed IN the folder, what business is it of the school or the teacher what color the folder is. So glad I don't have kids in school. Totally understand why my youngest is going to home school hers and why the middle one sends hers to private school. Those two daughters of mine aren't as tolerant as I am. pardon.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... I actually saw a supply list that said what COLOR folders for which subject the kid needed. That's going a bit far, IMO...

The specific colors are to identify the subjects ... to make things move faster when switching in the classroom, not to stifle creativity or individuality.

 

A lot of these kids have a hard time remember which folder and it is faster and easier to be able to say "get out your red folder"

 

(Sorry I keep adding)

 

I wonder when the last time is that you spent any time in a class full of kids trying to keep them all moving quickly through their schedule for the day and not dilly-dallying and wasting time. And if you realize how often they get the wrong stuff out. And how much wasted time there is in trying to get all of the Power Ranger folders figured out. When you're dealing with as many kids as the teachers have in their classes they have to streamline and if having everyone use the same color for the same subject makes it easier for the kids as well as the teacher where is that such a problem? Put some Power Ranger stickers on the folders and move on to something that is worth worrying about.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the potential benefits of it but it stifles individuality and takes away the child having to be responsible for anything. I mean heaven forbid a child have to remember that the blue folder is for Social Studies and the red folder is for English. Let someone else be responsible. It's a lesson that will serve them well their entire life.

 

I was last in the classroom with my daughter in middle school. I subbed while she was in elementary school.

 

 

The specific colors are to identify the subjects ... to make things move faster when switching in the classroom, not to stifle creativity or individuality.

 

A lot of these kids have a hard time remember which folder and it is faster and easier to be able to say "get out your red folder"

 

(Sorry I keep adding)

 

I wonder when the last time is that you spent any time in a class full of kids trying to keep them all moving quickly through their schedule for the day and not dilly-dallying and wasting time. And if you realize how often they get the wrong stuff out. And how much wasted time there is in trying to get all of the Power Ranger folders figured out. When you're dealing with as many kids as the teachers have in their classes they have to streamline and if having everyone use the same color for the same subject makes it easier for the kids as well as the teacher where is that such a problem? Put some Power Ranger stickers on the folders and move on to something that is worth worrying about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to just sit here and LOL at some of these posts.

 

Do you folks honestly think that the school systems should pay for all supplies??? Just think about how your household expenses have gone up and multiply by 1000's. Just buying toilet paper, napkins, cleaning supplies, etc has gone up drastically. School systems are buying those things, buying food for the lunchroom (not all of it is free from the government), paying all utilities, salaries, etc. Some of you folks have owned or worked for small business--think about what it costs to run it. Then again, multiply by 1000"s.

 

YES, they get tax dollars, but not nearly enough. But hey--they could always raise your taxes so you wouldn't have to spend that extra $30 at the beginning of the school year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the potential benefits of it but it stifles individuality and takes away the child having to be responsible for anything. I mean heaven forbid a child have to remember that the blue folder is for Social Studies and the red folder is for English. Let someone else be responsible. It's a lesson that will serve them well their entire life.

 

I was last in the classroom with my daughter in middle school. I subbed while she was in elementary school.

 

So as I said, slap some stickers on that sucker ... but trying to get a class of 20-30 kids to all move quickly through subject change at the elementary school level without a simple color coded system is a pointless.time waster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Classroom supplies, absolutely positively. Individually used items, no. If you WANT to send extras for the classroom, fine and dandy. But if it is an item that is needed TO TEACH, that is not the responsibility of the parent to send. That is the responsibility of the school system to provide. If the cyber academy can do that, no reason other public schools can't do the same (the cyber academy provides everything needed).

 

While we're at it, pay the teachers and bus drivers more and the administrators less.

 

I think I throw this our every year when we have this discussion. What if Walmart made you bring supplies when you bought items from them? Let's say you had to bring cash register tape, staplers, etc. Would that be OK? How would that be different than this?

 

I've owned a couple of small businesses and I have worked with hundreds of others who have owned small businesses since the mid 1980s. To even suggest that a business charge their customers an additional amount over and above the cost of the product or service or to provide materials, JUST FOR THE PRIVILEGE OF DOING BUSINESS, would certainly run that business out of business pretty quickly. I could just see me charging my clients for paper, ink, pens, etc. I'm supposed to be making enough money to pay for overhead. If I'm not able to pay for supplies, I need to re-evaluate either my expenses or my pricing. Perhaps, I need to stop taking so much money for my salary. Perhaps I need to stop driving the SUV and go with a smaller, more fuel efficient vehicle when I make calls to my clients. Schools should be no different. Anything that is used directly in teaching should be the LAST THING to go and anything that is fluff should be the first thing to go.

 

Do you folks honestly think that the school systems should pay for all supplies???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Classroom supplies, absolutely positively. Individually used items, no. If you WANT to send extras for the classroom, fine and dandy. But if it is an item that is needed TO TEACH, that is not the responsibility of the parent to send. That is the responsibility of the school system to provide. If the cyber academy can do that, no reason other public schools can't do the same (the cyber academy provides everything needed).

 

While we're at it, pay the teachers and bus drivers more and the administrators less.

 

I think I throw this our every year when we have this discussion. What if Walmart made you bring supplies when you bought items from them? Let's say you had to bring cash register tape, staplers, etc. Would that be OK? How would that be different than this?

 

I've owned a couple of small businesses and I have worked with hundreds of others who have owned small businesses since the mid 1980s. To even suggest that a business charge their customers an additional amount over and above the cost of the product or service or to provide materials, JUST FOR THE PRIVILEGE OF DOING BUSINESS, would certainly run that business out of business pretty quickly. I could just see me charging my clients for paper, ink, pens, etc. I'm supposed to be making enough money to pay for overhead. If I'm not able to pay for supplies, I need to re-evaluate either my expenses or my pricing. Perhaps, I need to stop taking so much money for my salary. Perhaps I need to stop driving the SUV and go with a smaller, more fuel efficient vehicle when I make calls to my clients. Schools should be no different. Anything that is used directly in teaching should be the LAST THING to go and anything that is fluff should be the first thing to go.

 

 

Do you have kids in school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm always surprised by this thread every year. I was in elementary school almost 40 years ago. And, every year - my mom got my school supply list and every year we got just about this supply list. The clorox wipes, bags, etc. weren't on there. But, there was always a big list on the wall to choose something from to send in. 40 years ago - they were asking for particular things in particular colors. I remember in 2nd grade when Mrs. Bowen asked for certain color composition notebooks. My mother about came unglued because the colored ones (versus the black and white ones) weren't on sale. So, this is nothing new. It really isn't.

 

And - this talk of property taxes. I don't think any of us pay enough property taxes to cover one individual child. I know that I don't cover one - let alone the two that I send to school. Us and my parents (no kids in their house) don't cover the two kids. So, don't give me that crap either.

 

As far as administrators - the in school administrators - we need - most of them are working late into the night getting everything done. As for the county office in Paulding - well - I haven't seen too many sitting around doing nothing. But, I agree - we might need to revisit our current administrative needs.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually get the supplies on the list (even splurge and get the three-pack box of Kleenex and Germ-X) because I know people can't always buy their own. I get the red and yellow and blue folders with the pockets and the packs of college-ruled paper and plain yellow #2 pencils. I hope the list gets a little less structured in middle and high school where he can pick a Falcons folder instead of whatever color is on the list. I think we can all agree that schools need more money and teachers and bus drivers need to be paid much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My youngest daughter graduated in 1999 and I had kids in school for 21 years. At one time I had one in elementary, one in middle and one in high school.

 

My three oldest grandchildren have already graduated high school and one is going into her third year in college. I have a grandson in 12th, a granddaughter in 9th and a granddaughter going into Pre-K in September. The 12th grader and the 9th grader go to private school (their older sister went to a magnet school and rode MARTA to get there) and the one in Pre-K will be home schooled. Neither set of parents want to have to put up with the crap that the public schools not only tolerate but generate. The youngest ones, now 3 and 5, will go to public school once they move out of Cobb County and Georgia. They both will be home schooled until that time.

 

FWIW, I was room mother three years, subbed and volunteered at school, chaperoned field trips, etc. All the teachers in the elementary school knew me, as did the principal, secretaries and even the lunchroom workers. I was there almost as much as my kids were.

 

I have friends and relatives who are, or were, parapros, teachers, principals, bus drivers and other school system employees. Without exception, they all believe the system is broken and needs to be fixed. Most also agree that the school systems get plenty of money to pay for what the teacher needs to teach but that the school systems would rather spend the money, shall we say, less responsibly. They all do what they do because they believe they are making a difference in children's lives but they wish the schools would help them out a little bit more. Parents are called on to do much more than they should have to do, considering they are already paying taxes. But I guess if you can't get a parent to participate in a school activity, having them send in something at least makes them think they are doing something.

Do you have kids in school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Classroom supplies, absolutely positively. Individually used items, no. If you WANT to send extras for the classroom, fine and dandy. But if it is an item that is needed TO TEACH, that is not the responsibility of the parent to send. That is the responsibility of the school system to provide. If the cyber academy can do that, no reason other public schools can't do the same (the cyber academy provides everything needed).

 

While we're at it, pay the teachers and bus drivers more and the administrators less.

 

I think I throw this our every year when we have this discussion. What if Walmart made you bring supplies when you bought items from them? Let's say you had to bring cash register tape, staplers, etc. Would that be OK? How would that be different than this?

 

I've owned a couple of small businesses and I have worked with hundreds of others who have owned small businesses since the mid 1980s. To even suggest that a business charge their customers an additional amount over and above the cost of the product or service or to provide materials, JUST FOR THE PRIVILEGE OF DOING BUSINESS, would certainly run that business out of business pretty quickly. I could just see me charging my clients for paper, ink, pens, etc. I'm supposed to be making enough money to pay for overhead. If I'm not able to pay for supplies, I need to re-evaluate either my expenses or my pricing. Perhaps, I need to stop taking so much money for my salary. Perhaps I need to stop driving the SUV and go with a smaller, more fuel efficient vehicle when I make calls to my clients. Schools should be no different. Anything that is used directly in teaching should be the LAST THING to go and anything that is fluff should be the first thing to go.

 

The school system isn't a business, it's a public service. The only way in which a business and the school system are similar is that each must operate within a budget and have employees....outside of that, you cannot compare Walmart and the school system.

 

So, understanding it's a public service, compare it to other public services. When you buy a house, does the water dept. come out and do all of your plumbing? If you have a leaky toilet, do you call the water dept to fix it? If your driveway is cracked, do you call GDOT? Of course not...the services are in place to provide an infrastructure that betters the community by providing critical services. The school system is providing teachers, buses, administrators, school maintenance, food, books/learning materials, computers, internet access, libraries, multimedia devices, etc.....This is all available to your child or the children in YOUR community. Knowing all that, and knowing that people bitch and moan about their property taxes, is it really unreasonable that, much like your personal home's plumbing, your child is asked to bring consumables either for themselves or to share with the class?

 

It's obvious that you despise the public school system...considering your 2 youngest grandchildren will be homeschooled, that says a lot about the conversations regarding public education in your family. That's fine, but I feel like you're trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill because you see an opportunity to talk trash about something you despise.

 

mrnn

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The school system isn't a business, it's a public service. The only way in which a business and the school system are similar is that each must operate within a budget and have employees....outside of that, you cannot compare Walmart and the school system. And that includes paying all expenses of doing business.

 

So, understanding it's a public service, compare it to other public services. When you buy a house, does the water dept. come out and do all of your plumbing? If you have a leaky toilet, do you call the water dept to fix it? If your driveway is cracked, do you call GDOT? Of course not...the services are in place to provide an infrastructure that betters the community by providing critical services. The school system is providing teachers, buses, administrators, school maintenance, food, books/learning materials, computers, internet access, libraries, multimedia devices, etc.....In many cases, the school is not providing books or learning materials. This is all available to your child or the children in YOUR community. Knowing all that, and knowing that people bitch and moan about their property taxes, is it really unreasonable that, much like your personal home's plumbing, your child is asked to bring consumables either for themselves or to share with the class? What each individual child uses in class or for school should be up to their parents to provide, not the community. The "community" is already contributing, remember.

 

It's obvious that you despise the public school system...considering your 2 youngest grandchildren will be homeschooled, that says a lot about the conversations regarding public education in your family. That's fine, but I feel like you're trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill because you see an opportunity to talk trash about something you despise. I don't despise the school system. I think it needs a major overhaul. I'm a product of the public school system, as is my husband and all three of my children. The decision to home school the two youngest ones was not mine to make. I actually pushed for them to go to public school. Considering the test scores and everything else at the school they would be going to, it does seem that my daughter and son in law are making the best choice for their kids.

 

mrnn

 

I just wonder how many of you would be fine going to visit someone if they told you bring your own toilet paper, paper towels and hand sanitizer yet they lived in a million dollar mansion. That's what I thought. dry.gif

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wonder how many of you would be fine going to visit someone if they told you bring your own toilet paper, paper towels and hand sanitizer yet they lived in a million dollar mansion. That's what I thought. dry.gif

 

 

 

 

I have been out of school 57 years, and every since then kids have had to buy supplies. What has changed, EVERYBODY WANTS SOMETHING FOR NOTHING. Don't your daughter have to buy supplies, for home school. What is the difference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ALWAYS have had to buy personal supplies--paper, pencils, notebooks. What has changed is the student having to buy CLASSROOM SUPPLIES. Did you have to provide chalk or an eraser for the chalkboard? Did you have to provide mimeograph ink?

 

If my daughter is going through Georgia Cyber Academy, she does NOT have to pay for "classroom" materials, not even a computer. From the Georgia Cyber Academy website:

 

What are the costs?Because we are part of the public school system, the Georgia Cyber Academy is tuition free. The entire K¹² curriculum is provided free of charge.

 

and....

 

 

Does the program provide textbooks and other instructional materials?

Yes, we provide all the textbooks and instructional materials that are needed to complete the program. These books and materials are sent to students directly.

 

 

Naturally, any notebooks, paper, pencils, etc would be the responsibility of the cyber student, as it is the student who attends a brick and mortar school. The point is the cyber academy provides textbooks and instructional materials and more and more students in public schools are having to provide markers to write on the board, computer headsets and textbooks (if there is even one in use).

 

 

I have been out of school 57 years, and every since then kids have had to buy supplies. What has changed, EVERYBODY WANTS SOMETHING FOR NOTHING. Don't your daughter have to buy supplies, for home school. What is the difference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ALWAYS have had to buy personal supplies--paper, pencils, notebooks. What has changed is the student having to buy CLASSROOM SUPPLIES. Did you have to provide chalk or an eraser for the chalkboard? Did you have to provide mimeograph ink?

 

If my daughter is going through Georgia Cyber Academy, she does NOT have to pay for "classroom" materials, not even a computer. From the Georgia Cyber Academy website:

 

What are the costs?Because we are part of the public school system, the Georgia Cyber Academy is tuition free. The entire K¹² curriculum is provided free of charge.

 

and....

 

 

Does the program provide textbooks and other instructional materials?

Yes, we provide all the textbooks and instructional materials that are needed to complete the program. These books and materials are sent to students directly.

 

 

Naturally, any notebooks, paper, pencils, etc would be the responsibility of the cyber student, as it is the student who attends a brick and mortar school. The point is the cyber academy provides textbooks and instructional materials and more and more students in public schools are having to provide markers to write on the board, computer headsets and textbooks (if there is even one in use).

 

 

The schools that my grandkids go to have never been asked for these things. You know it is only asking, wherever it is. It don't say your child can't come to school you don't. And lawd knows there is a lot of people that don't.I am so tired of people bitching about thins like this. If you don't want your child to furnish these things, maybe some other parent will,

Edited by Greatma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...