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I saw that on the news........

 

 

By MYFOXATLANTA STAFF

 

BARTOW COUNTY, Ga. - Authorities are responding to reports of an explosion at a plant in Bartow County.

 

Euharlee city officials tell FOX 5 that fire, EMS and police crews are responding to the incident at Plant Bowen.

 

Officials could not give any other details on the nature of the incident. There are no details on any casualties.

 

All roads around the plant are closed, according to Bartow County officials.

 

Georgia Power authorities confirmed to FOX 5 that they are working an incident at the plant.

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Rome News-Tribune reporting that Redmond has three ambulances and Floyd has four ambulances there waiting to carry any injured to the hospital. Ambulances are being kept away from the area until authorities can confirm no chemical spills, etc.

 

http://romenews-tribune.com/view/full_story/22159311/article-UPDATE--Explosion-confirmed-at-Plant-Bowen--police-ask-people-to-avoid-area?instance=home_news_lead

 

Article says a generator turbine exploded. What could cause that?

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Rome News-Tribune reporting that Redmond has three ambulances and Floyd has four ambulances there waiting to carry any injured to the hospital. Ambulances are being kept away from the area until authorities can confirm no chemical spills, etc.

 

http://romenews-tribune.com/view/full_story/22159311/article-UPDATE--Explosion-confirmed-at-Plant-Bowen--police-ask-people-to-avoid-area?instance=home_news_lead

 

Article says a generator turbine exploded. What could cause that?

The generators are cooled with hydrogen.

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The generators are cooled with hydrogen.

 

 

OK, you're gonna have to talk slowly. I'm a right-brained girl who understands basically nothing about all this. So the generators have to be cooled? Is that what causes the steam coming out the big stacks over there? And hydrogen is used to cool them...is that volatile?

 

Latest update from the Rome News article says that only minor injuries at the plant, and the hospitals do not expect any influx of injured people. Good news.

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OK, you're gonna have to talk slowly. I'm a right-brained girl who understands basically nothing about all this. So the generators have to be cooled? Is that what causes the steam coming out the big stacks over there? And hydrogen is used to cool them...is that volatile?

 

Latest update from the Rome News article says that only minor injuries at the plant, and the hospitals do not expect any influx of injured people. Good news.

 

As I understand it Bowen is coal fired. They burn coal to boil water to produce steam. The steam drives the turbine as it passes through. Water produces steam at 212 degees f. So I would imagine this is even hotter. Coal, natural gas and nuclear all prufuce steam. Hydro uses moving water to turn the turbines. Liquid Hydrogen is very cold so it could be used to cool. That is where the General looses me. How do they cool without warping or shattering the metal.

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I found this on WIKI:

 

 

Fire officials are investigating an explosion at the facility that occurred on April 4, 2013. Injuries were reported and the explosion was thought to be from a turbine located in the power station.[1]

 

 

They said on the news Plant Bowen was the 2nd largest coal plant in the Western Hemisphere, so I found this.

 

 

 

Plant Bowen is a coal-fired power station located just outside Euharlee, Georgia, United States, approximately 8.7 mi (14 km) west-south-west from Cartersville. At 3,499 megawatts, Plant Bowen has the largest generating capacity of any coal-fired power plant in North America since the partial shutdown of Ontario Power Generation's Nanticoke Generating Station in Canada. Plant Bowen ranked third in the nation for net generation in 2006 producing over 22,630,000 MWh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

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As I understand it Bowen is coal fired. They burn coal to boil water to produce steam. The steam drives the turbine as it passes through. Water produces steam at 212 degees f. So I would imagine this is even hotter. Coal, natural gas and nuclear all prufuce steam. Hydro uses moving water to turn the turbines. Liquid Hydrogen is very cold so it could be used to cool. That is where the General looses me. How do they cool without warping or shattering the metal.

 

OOH!!! That was excellent! I followed every word! Now if we can get an answer to your last question, which I wouldn't have even thought about (natch)...

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The steam turbines are water cooled not hydrogen cooled. They have experimented with a water precooler to reduce steam evaporation but it has not been fully implemented. The steam you see rising from the 400' towers is the heat energy being dissipated by air cooling and released through evaporation. That water recycles into the cooling pond and eventually circulates back through the steam turbine. The precooler is designed to minimize the water lost through evaporation. All four turbines are on the third floor and depending on which part of the plant you are in it rises 12-14 floors if I remember. The boilers are 9-10 stories tall and there are 4 of them one for each turbine. I am posting from memory but I am close on these facts.

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The steam turbines are water cooled not hydrogen cooled. They have experimented with a water precooler to reduce steam evaporation but it has not been fully implemented. The steam you see rising from the 400' towers is the heat energy being dissipated by air cooling and released through evaporation. That water recycles into the cooling pond and eventually circulates back through the steam turbine. The precooler is designed to minimize the water lost through evaporation. All four turbines are on the third floor and depending on which part of the plant you are in it rises 12-14 floors if I remember. The boilers are 9-10 stories tall and there are 4 of them one for each turbine. I am posting from memory but I am close on these facts.

 

 

Turbines do not need to be cooled, it is the generator that uses hydrogen to cool them.

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The steam turbines are water cooled not hydrogen cooled. They have experimented with a water precooler to reduce steam evaporation but it has not been fully implemented. The steam you see rising from the 400' towers is the heat energy being dissipated by air cooling and released through evaporation. That water recycles into the cooling pond and eventually circulates back through the steam turbine. The precooler is designed to minimize the water lost through evaporation. All four turbines are on the third floor and depending on which part of the plant you are in it rises 12-14 floors if I remember. The boilers are 9-10 stories tall and there are 4 of them one for each turbine. I am posting from memory but I am close on these facts.

 

More interesting info. Thanks!

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Turbines do not need to be cooled, it is the generator that uses hydrogen to cool them.

 

Never heard of it. Worked there two and a half years (2001-2003) as a contractor and have had my hands inside Unit Three and Unit Four generators. Not saying it is not so but I did not see any evidence of Hydrogen cooling. And yes there is cooling water for the turbine engine housing and turbine support equipment much like a car engine. The other steam dissipate is make up water and condensate. I will admit my back ground is electrical not mechanical.

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Never heard of it. Worked there two and a half years (2001-2003) as a contractor and have had my hands inside Unit Three and Unit Four generators. Not saying it is not so but I did not see any evidence of Hydrogen cooling. And yes there is cooling water for the turbine engine housing and turbine support equipment much like a car engine. The other steam dissipate is make up water and condensate. I will admit my back ground is electrical not mechanical.

I think you are correct, but my memory may be wrong as well.

 

I wonder if I know you :ninja: probably not. Lol

 

Also, because I keep seeing this on FB: Bowen is not nuclear! It's coal!

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Never heard of it. Worked there two and a half years (2001-2003) as a contractor and have had my hands inside Unit Three and Unit Four generators. Not saying it is not so but I did not see any evidence of Hydrogen cooling. And yes there is cooling water for the turbine engine housing and turbine support equipment much like a car engine. The other steam dissipate is make up water and condensate. I will admit my back ground is electrical not mechanical.

 

25 years working for G E .

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I fished a night tournament there once in the lake the coal train circles. I am mesmerized by operations of that magnitude. Seemed like that coal trained moved all night at a slow steady pace, unloaded a train car load of coal every few minutes.

 

A couple of summers ago I had to go on the top of the plant to look at some issues they were having. They said the temperature going up the last flight of stairs was 140 degrees. It was hot enough that when we stepped out on the roof into 98 degree air it felt like a/c.

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General, I read it was a generator turbine explosion... What could have caused this? Do you know?

 

First there had to be a leak and then some kind of ignition, spark or something like that. A little more complicated than that. The hydrogen is in tubes that line the inside of the stator and help disapate the heat.

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General, I read it was a generator turbine explosion... What could have caused this? Do you know?

 

According to the Patch, the General called it:

 

The turbine was being "purged" with hydrogen gas when something ignited the gas, causing the explosion, WRGA Rome's NewsTalk reports. Still unknown is what exactly sparked the hydrogen gas.

 

Carterville Patch

 

Not sure why they would want to use a flammable gas to cool the turbine, lots of other things they could use. :blink:

 

Remember the Hindenburg?

 

Bad week for power plants:

 

Entergy's Arkansas Nuclear plant did an emergency shutdown when a generator Stator (500 tons)for unit 1 fell during a lift, damaging water and power equipment, causing unit 2 to auto shut down. Emergency generators are providing cooling to unit one, while commercial power is being used to cool unit 2. One worker killed. :(

 

Platts

 

Bowen is a big part of the SE power grid... might get interesting this spring/summer if the power demand starts climbing and Bowen can't run at full power. (and Unit one of Entergy's plant)

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First there had to be a leak and then some kind of ignition, spark or something like that. A little more complicated than that. The hydrogen is in tubes that line the inside of the stator and help disapate the heat.

Thanks, General. I had no idea there was hydrogen used... I have been checking the news outlets and nothing had been specific.

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So scary! Husband worked there back in 06-08 even though he doesn't work there anymore his scared the crap out of me!! I'm sure he could answer any questions about the plant he did say it could have been very serious! He's out of town so doesn't know a whole lot I just told him there was an explosion!

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Dang, I was in the basement this afternoon off of Dabbs Bridge and the house and windows rattled from a boom. If that was it, that was a heck of a explosion.

 

Glad no one was hurt!!

 

SG

 

We heard it at Burnt Hickory Park too! It was loud and shook the building!

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