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Teacher Arrested


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f00372c621f5150a346003d12922be6c A Paulding County School System employee has been arrested in the wake of an alleged Oct. 8 incident at an elementary school.

 

According to a Paulding County Sheriff's Office news release, the sheriff's office's Crimes Against Children division was notified Oct. 8 of an alleged incident where a pre-kindergarten student at Northside Elementary was improperly restrained as a result of some type of outburst the child had. The child, a 4-year-old, was allegedly improperly restrained by Jack Talley, who worked at the school.

 

According to reports, other school district employees observed the incident and alerted school administrators. Administrators then contacted the family as well as detectives who immediately began investigating the incident.

 

After a lengthy investigation and subsequent interviews of witnesses, authorities determined that Talley acted inappropriately in the restraint of the child.

 

Talley turned himself into the Paulding County Detention Center Monday about 2:20 p.m., where he was charged with misdemeanor simple battery. He was released later that day on a $1,300 bond.

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this is crazy..... a child pitches a temper tantrum, yet the teacher goes to jail.... don'tcha just love our local sheriff?

Know you are "Anti Law Enforcement", maybe due to your own dealings, however, did ya miss this part..."After a lengthy investigation and subsequent interviews of witnesses, authorities determined that Talley acted inappropriately in the restraint of the child."

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this is crazy..... a child pitches a temper tantrum, yet the teacher goes to jail.... don'tcha just love our local sheriff?

 

 

Given that it was other professionals in the school that witnessed it and turned it in one can assume it was not so simple.

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According to the news, the teacher pinned the child down on the ground, and mom wasn't notified until later that day or the next day when the bus driver mentioned it. The child is in a special pre-K to help him with communication skills. It wasn't a case of someone pitching a fit and the teacher went to jail, there was inappropriate action taken by the teacher. If anybody tried to pin MY four-year-old to the ground, a few hours in jail would be the least of their concerns, especially if it's a special needs child requiring extra effort. It had to be a blatant violation for two other teachers to see it and report it. The school didn't tell mom for a day and a half and she only found out through the bus driver.

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Being as Dis jr. is in a special needs class for children with impulse / emotional control issues, I have seen restraint tactics used on my son and others within the classroom. Rather than have the child hurt themselves one or both teachers would first pin the child and then lay over themin a manner that kept them from thrashing about. Another child would usually( this is the funny part, without prompting) go get the pillow and place it under the first student's head. they would remain that way until the child calmed down. I have also seen them use other less physical tactics of envelopment. I would have to wonder what the teacher did wrong or if the other teachers just were not used to seeing this done. This was a special needs teacher in another class. I will still have to take a wait and see attitude with this one.

 

 

 

Correction. It does appear that the child was a special needs child. That does not change my opinion right now though.

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Once, I had to restrain a child in ASP. He was brought to the office after hitting another child and went berserk in the counselor's office. The principal and asst principal came in and showed me how to restrain him safely (lucky me) and I did. He still managed to get one leg loose and kicked the principal in the chest. School safety was called and he was taken home to meet his aunt. It only happened once, but once was enough. :blink:

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Once, I had to restrain a child in ASP. He was brought to the office after hitting another child and went berserk in the counselor's office. The principal and asst principal came in and showed me how to restrain him safely (lucky me) and I did. He still managed to get one leg loose and kicked the principal in the chest. School safety was called and he was taken home to meet his aunt. It only happened once, but once was enough. :blink:

 

Why would the administrators "show" you how to restrain a child a not do it themselves? Hmmm. As a former employee of the BOE, there are classes that teach the proper techniques to restrain and it is ALWAYS supposed to be used as a last resort if you cannot de-escalate the situation. Still trying to figure out why the admins would show you and not do it themselves.

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Every time I restrain a child I fear for my job.......but I fear more for the safety of the student and others.

Judgement calls are tough to make.

 

yep, and you don't have the luxury of time to make them. I wanted to be a teacher for a long time. Unfortunately, (in retrospect) I turned down a position (way back when) of teaching drafting and design at Chattahoochee Vo-Tech in favor of a more lucrative profession on the development side of things. But I don't think I could EVER imagine teaching younger, less emotionally developed children. I think it takes a special kind of person with unfathomable compassion and understanding to handle that.

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Why would the administrators "show" you how to restrain a child a not do it themselves? Hmmm. As a former employee of the BOE, there are classes that teach the proper techniques to restrain and it is ALWAYS supposed to be used as a last resort if you cannot de-escalate the situation. Still trying to figure out why the admins would show you and not do it themselves.

Good question. When I worked in the school system with special needs (especially elementary) I had to restrain kids often. It was the nature of the class I worked in. I was sent to classes each year to learn and update my proper restraining techniques. There were only a handful of us who were trained initially and we were the only ones who could restrain. After a couple of years they started to train everyone who would be responsible for the special needs kids. It is not pretty and to the untrained eye it may even look like abuse but it really is supposed to only be used when the child is in the position to harm himself or others. And when done properly it is very safe for everyone involved. Although I have met the man who is charged in this case, I cannot speak for him nor the method that he used with this child.

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Why would the administrators "show" you how to restrain a child a not do it themselves? Hmmm. As a former employee of the BOE, there are classes that teach the proper techniques to restrain and it is ALWAYS supposed to be used as a last resort if you cannot de-escalate the situation. Still trying to figure out why the admins would show you and not do it themselves.

 

I don't know the employee. I don't know any of the details of the situation other than whats been reported. I have been through several types of restraint training at former jobs with special needs children/adults and some of them are very complicated. Especially in dealing with children, it never goes exactly as you are trained and some of those holds are complicated. A misplaced hand could construe an improper hold. For example in one training, when blocking an over-head blow, I did not rotate my arm correctly from side to side and my elbow stuck out. I was told that if my elbow came into contact with the child aggressor's arm or hand (that they were trying to hit me with) it could be construed as offensive on my part instead of defensive. It could be construed as throwing an elbow so I had to make sure I rotated my arms precisely while being struck.

 

I've also had the police called on me years ago when I was restraining a small 8-9 year old boy in the front yard of a group home. It looked like I was abusing the kid to the passerby or neighbor, but I was actually trying desperately to keep him from running into a busy highway when he was in the middle of an emotional crisis and not thinking clearly. I was so GLAD when law enforcement showed up. The other staff member and I were trying our best to maintain legal holds on him, but the sheriff firmly pinned him to the ground in a way that I was not trained to do or physically able to do. (he was not hurting the kid) I also have reported restraints immediately to my supervisors or appropriate authorities whenever they have happened.

 

This employee may or may not have been in the wrong. I don't know. From what I've experienced and seen in the past, I'm not just not quick to judge.

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When I started subbing I was called several times to substitute in Special Needs classes at two different Paulding County Elementary schools and it was an eye opener. I'll be honest I was shocked and shaken with some of the things I saw. No child was ever hurt but it is a whole different ball game taking care and teaching special needs children (not all but some). I couldn't handle it even though I knew it was necessary and eventually learned to say no when called to help in these classrooms. The teachers who work with these students are beyond angelic. These students are so sweet but at the same time they can be quite a challenge to those of us not accustomed to working with them.

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Why would the administrators "show" you how to restrain a child a not do it themselves? Hmmm. As a former employee of the BOE, there are classes that teach the proper techniques to restrain and it is ALWAYS supposed to be used as a last resort if you cannot de-escalate the situation. Still trying to figure out why the admins would show you and not do it themselves.

 

In my 35+ years of teaching, I was never shown how to restrain a child. Only SPED teachers were taught that, to my knowledge. As to why I restrained the child, I was younger, stronger, in charge of ASP and wearing jeans. Just seemed more practical to me. It wasn't complicated and I'm a fast learner. I had no problem with doing it. :glare:

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I never understood why the school district doesn't hold a seminar or something to talk about the HELP training with the community. Invite the parents and anyone who wants to know about it. This might solve some complaints and issues.

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