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Looking to rent a flute for my daughter. Wondering who you used and who I should NOT use. Thank you for your input!

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we found it was cheaper to buy a used one. The rental place just wanted way to much to buy. Ken Stanton and Artly is who the school used.

 

We got ours on ebay and here. I think we got lucky though. If you look around you can some times get great deals. We got a new Resin Artly Clarinet on ebay for 100.00 my daughter uses this when marching. We got our Wonderful wooden Clarinet from a lovely lady here on pcom for 100.00 she uses this one for concert and competition (like all state).

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Looking to rent a flute for my daughter. Wondering who you used and who I should NOT use. Thank you for your input!

 

I would not rent using the school's vendor unless they were local. From what I remember they were expensive and from out of state. I would much rather put my money back in the local economy.

 

Paulding music does rentals, and they seem reasonably priced. I've only purchased reeds for a saxophone there, but the guy was always helpful and friendly.

 

I'd also consider a cheap used item from there, craigslist or ebay. Then if you daughter likes it after the first year and wants to stick with it, you can find something better. There is one on craigslist for $75. The local music shop can also refurbish used stuff. I priced it for our saxophone and it was very reasonable (can't remember how much). But the band teacher was able to look it over and said it was fine.

 

For their first year - if it makes noise it will work.

Edited by hurstrsq

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The only problem with that is, do you want to pay for a bad instrument now and have to still buy another one later or would you rather do it right the first time. As with anything, if you buy used you run a risk. The music companies your band director chooses are because over the long haul, they have the best prices.

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Speaking from having my kids in band:

I have bought instruments from four different stores. All the music stores that are legitimate stores use quality instruments that actually cost the same. Some have cheaper payments at the beginning but the final cost is the same.

 

As far as "local" stores, Paulding Music actually sells instruments from a national chain called Music and Arts which was owned by Guitar City.

 

The band director recommends a store for their reputation and the fact that they will provide a service rep that comes by the band room each week to do instrument repairs. Paulding Music and ken Stanton do not have qualified repairmen that go by the band rooms and Paulding Music does not have a repairman in their store.

 

Many parents will buy a used instrument that may need a lot of work on it but never follow through so the child never gets what they should from the instrument. There are many good, used instruments out there but they may need repairs before they play as well as they should.

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As far as "local" stores, Paulding Music actually sells instruments from a national chain called Music and Arts which was owned by Guitar City.

 

Is that good or bad? They've got to come from somewhere if he's not making them in the back room. It is still a local business providing a service to local residents, paying taxes, keeping the building rented, etc.

 

The band director recommends a store for their reputation and the fact that they will provide a service rep that comes by the band room each week to do instrument repairs. Paulding Music and ken Stanton do not have qualified repairmen that go by the band rooms and Paulding Music does not have a repairman in their store.

 

That sounds like a load of crap. No reason an instrument would break that often, unless they are selling junk. Otherwise the kids are abusing them.

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I always used Jennings Music on Canton Road. It been a few years since I've been in band, but I bought several instruments from them, took lessons there and had all my repairs done there. They were always fantastic!

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We checked into prices for Flute rentals for our student. Paulding Music was renting them for $34.02 for 3 months. The music company the school chose is renting them for $50.00 for 2 months.

 

When I talked to the owner he said that rentals typically will cost you twice what the instrument usually costs (no matter where you go). For example, he could sell us a new flute for $450 or we could rent-to-own for $900. He had several used flutes for sale starting at $269 each. Each used instrument has the recipt listing what was done to each one to repair it, if a repair was needed and how much that repair cost. He will also buy back an instrument that you buy there. I did not check into what he usually pays to buy an instrument. I would assume that it would depend on the type and condition of the instrument.

 

They also have professional musicians who give private lessons. They are once a week and cost $22.50 for each 1/2 hour lesson. I am going to go and sign our son up for private lessons tomorrow.

 

And for those of who want to know where we are getting our instrument... We have a sister-in-law that used to play. She is loaning us her instrument.

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My youngest and third child just started band. With the first child we went to band night and rented a trumpet through their rent to own program. When I got home looked at the paperwork and figured out it was going to end up costing us close to $1,000 for a used instrument, I started shopping elsewhere. I used that initial rental period to shop for one on Craigslist and ended up getting a trumpet for $65.

 

By the time the second kid came along I knew to start shopping the summer before he started 6th grade. He wanted to play the Clarinet. We spent some time in Florida with family over that summer and I found one for sale down there. I think I paid $85 for it. When I brought it to the Band director at the school he said the case alone was worth more than that. two months later when my son decided to switch instruments I sold the clarinet for $190 and bought a trumpet locally for $120. We bought it from a college student who took exceptional care of it and it looked in near new condition. We actually tried to get my daughter (child #1) to use this trumpet but she was attached to her $65 trumpet and resisted. Child #2 was in band for 1 and 1/2 years. Now that Child #1 is in high school she uses one for practice or back up and the other for games/concerts.

 

We are not onto child #3. He wanted to play percussion. I got a great deal on a percussion kit over the summer and asked the band director at open house to please not switch instruments on us. Needless to say my son has now been convinced the Tuba is his calling. I'm hanging on to that percussion kit and hope to get him lessons later this year.

 

I don't think it matters how much or how little you spend. I would recommend sticking with the brands that the band director recommends. We never spent more than $120 and honestly when my daughter first joined band in 6th grade and we showed up to band night and saw the cost we almost pulled her out. We are just not in a position to spend that kind of money and I know a lot of families out there are in the same boat. I'm grateful that we kept her in and were able to find a way to afford it. She still plays and is probably the only one of our three kids who will stick with it.

 

Also, the instrument people that the schools use typically have a deal to come once a week or every other week and service any "sick" instruments. It's not advertised but usually part of the deal is they have to look at any of the sick instruments and not just the ones rented or purchased through them.. Just thought I would mention that since it was a concern for us early on.

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Is that good or bad? They've got to come from somewhere if he's not making them in the back room. It is still a local business providing a service to local residents, paying taxes, keeping the building rented, etc.

 

 

 

That sounds like a load of crap. No reason an instrument would break that often, unless they are selling junk. Otherwise the kids are abusing them.

Paulding Music is a satellite store for Music and Arts/Guitar City. The instruments that all the stores sell or primarily made in China.

Musical instruments are somewhat delicate and can be damaged if dropped, mishandled, etc.

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we made the mistake of renting until I realized we were paying $800.00 for a $300.00 flute. I would go check out paulding music up on 92 I think they are real reasonable.

Also, the repair guys that come to the schools in the past (last yr I know) were from Gadsden music and they repair everyone instrument no matter where you bought it. I know they have always repaired my kids and I didn't buy either from the school.

Flutes get a gemeinhardt or a yamaha if you buy one. The good ones have a solid silver head and the rest of the flute is silver plated. A flute that was all solid silver would be too expensive for school.

Edited by whatzup?

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We checked into prices for Flute rentals for our student. Paulding Music was renting them for $34.02 for 3 months. The music company the school chose is renting them for $50.00 for 2 months.

 

When I talked to the owner he said that rentals typically will cost you twice what the instrument usually costs (no matter where you go). For example, he could sell us a new flute for $450 or we could rent-to-own for $900. He had several used flutes for sale starting at $269 each. Each used instrument has the recipt listing what was done to each one to repair it, if a repair was needed and how much that repair cost. He will also buy back an instrument that you buy there. I did not check into what he usually pays to buy an instrument. I would assume that it would depend on the type and condition of the instrument.

 

They also have professional musicians who give private lessons. They are once a week and cost $22.50 for each 1/2 hour lesson. I am going to go and sign our son up for private lessons tomorrow.

 

And for those of who want to know where we are getting our instrument... We have a sister-in-law that used to play. She is loaning us her instrument.

 

If you check, you will discover the final cost is the same regardless of the payment structure.

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Having been in band and my brother is a professional musician....

 

1. Don't use the rental programs. They are a waste of money. They are there to make your life easier - if that means having less money.

 

2. Buy an inexpensive entry level instrument for their first instrument. They don't know how to take care of them. They don't realize how delicate they can be. And, the quality of the instrument really doesn't matter when you're playing turkey in the straw (classic first song to learn). My first flute was a kimball flute - cheap. It was stolen in 8th grade, and I was going to stay in band - we upgraded to a geminhardt (sp?) solid sterling open holed flute. I would NEVER buy that instrument for a beginner - open holes are incredibly difficult to learn on and a sterling silver flute has to be taken care of, including being certain that it's not getting too hot (the silver is thin enough to deform). If your child decides to continue on in band - keep that original instruments for out door practices, parades, etc., buy them a higher quality instrument for the indoor performances, competitions, etc.

 

3. Let your kid try band. It draws together so many of their academic subjects - math, science, social studies as well as their social skills and just a general introduction to another part of the world.

 

4. I would easily buy an instrument off craigslist or ebay. From a private buyer - they are usually either someone is upgrading or quitting. You can get some good deals that way. I still have my open holed flute - haven't played it in many years. But, I have it. ;)!

 

5. Instruments from China (while I don't particularly care to by Chinese products) have come a long way in their quality. My brother needed an electrified cello for a series of gigs a few years ago. He bought a cheap cello from China off ebay ($250), my dad electrified it ($50), and it's about 80% as good as the $17K cello my brother uses for classical performances. Given the difference in cost - he's good with that. If the difference between your kid playing an instrument or not is a Chinese instrument - then buy the Chinese instrument. I think it's that important for a kid.

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Having been in band and my brother is a professional musician....

 

1. Don't use the rental programs. They are a waste of money. They are there to make your life easier - if that means having less money.

 

2. Buy an inexpensive entry level instrument for their first instrument. They don't know how to take care of them. They don't realize how delicate they can be. And, the quality of the instrument really doesn't matter when you're playing turkey in the straw (classic first song to learn). My first flute was a kimball flute - cheap. It was stolen in 8th grade, and I was going to stay in band - we upgraded to a geminhardt (sp?) solid sterling open holed flute. I would NEVER buy that instrument for a beginner - open holes are incredibly difficult to learn on and a sterling silver flute has to be taken care of, including being certain that it's not getting too hot (the silver is thin enough to deform). If your child decides to continue on in band - keep that original instruments for out door practices, parades, etc., buy them a higher quality instrument for the indoor performances, competitions, etc.

 

3. Let your kid try band. It draws together so many of their academic subjects - math, science, social studies as well as their social skills and just a general introduction to another part of the world.

 

4. I would easily buy an instrument off craigslist or ebay. From a private buyer - they are usually either someone is upgrading or quitting. You can get some good deals that way. I still have my open holed flute - haven't played it in many years. But, I have it. ;)!

 

5. Instruments from China (while I don't particularly care to by Chinese products) have come a long way in their quality. My brother needed an electrified cello for a series of gigs a few years ago. He bought a cheap cello from China off ebay ($250), my dad electrified it ($50), and it's about 80% as good as the $17K cello my brother uses for classical performances. Given the difference in cost - he's good with that. If the difference between your kid playing an instrument or not is a Chinese instrument - then buy the Chinese instrument. I think it's that important for a kid.

 

Not that I would disagree with you, but wouldn't it be better for a parent to follow the advice of the band director who is the professional dealing with teaching band. There are many points I could make from my kids being in band but I think parents should listen to the "experts" and this in this case that would be the local band directors.

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Not that I would disagree with you, but wouldn't it be better for a parent to follow the advice of the band director who is the professional dealing with teaching band. There are many points I could make from my kids being in band but I think parents should listen to the "experts" and this in this case that would be the local band directors.

 

The band gets a kick back from the instrument company - which I don't have an issue with. They are giving that company non-competitive access to those families. But, for that reason - no. AND, if you ask the band director about an instrument - they will give you their honest opinion.

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Not that I would disagree with you, but wouldn't it be better for a parent to follow the advice of the band director who is the professional dealing with teaching band. There are many points I could make from my kids being in band but I think parents should listen to the "experts" and this in this case that would be the local band directors.

 

You should also be able to think on your own.

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The band gets a kick back from the instrument company - which I don't have an issue with. They are giving that company non-competitive access to those families. But, for that reason - no. AND, if you ask the band director about an instrument - they will give you their honest opinion.

The only kickback is discounts on school bought equipment and weekly service in the band room.

 

You should also be able to think on your own.

It doesn't help if you do not have the knowledge and training to get the best results.

 

You should also be able to think on your own.

It doesn't help if you do not have the knowledge and training to get the best results.

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The only kickback is discounts on school bought equipment and weekly service in the band room.

 

No discounts. Checked that out myself. There is no need for weekly service. Just a way to justify in the increased cost. I played for 10 years. My brother has played for 30 years. Actively played instruments only need twice yearly service.

 

It doesn't help if you do not have the knowledge and training to get the best results.

 

You don't need the best results the first year or two. They don't have the skill level to get the best out of any instrument. No reason to spend hundreds of dollars on a basic instrument with weekly service when in reality a second hand instrument will be more than enough.

 

 

It doesn't help if you do not have the knowledge and training to get the best results.

 

Do you work for the instrument company??

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Do you work for the instrument company??

[

That has briefly been one of several vocations I have been in over the years.

Weekly service are helpful and needed and when a school purchases band equipment, they can get discounts that saves the taxpayers and schools money.

Edited by Orwell

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But, it doesn't save the taxpayers money - it just means they pay more the instrument rather than more in taxes. Same money.

 

Weekly service is helpful, but it's by no means necessary. And, it teaches the kids not to take care of their instrument because someone will be there to fix it in a couple of days.

 

30 years ago - Mrs. Hopkins stood up in front our band students and said - you can get it through the rental company - it's available if you want it. You can also certainly use an older instrument or buy a new one on your own. I can give you some recommendations of local music shops.

 

It's a racket.

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But, it doesn't save the taxpayers money - it just means they pay more the instrument rather than more in taxes. Same money.

 

Weekly service is helpful, but it's by no means necessary. And, it teaches the kids not to take care of their instrument because someone will be there to fix it in a couple of days.

 

30 years ago - Mrs. Hopkins stood up in front our band students and said - you can get it through the rental company - it's available if you want it. You can also certainly use an older instrument or buy a new one on your own. I can give you some recommendations of local music shops.

 

It's a racket.

It's no "racket".

If a school wants to buy a tuba for their band, the store will give the school the tuba for cost plus 10 or 20 percent. That means the school is using less tax money to purchase the tuba. Certain instruments are purchased by the school for the students to use in school due to their uniqueness and cost.

In Paulding County, there is very little budgeting for the bands and at some schools , almost nothing. Fundraisers and band booster clubs help provide the equipment. Carroll County, Douglas County, Cobb County are much more supportive.

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Band directors tell you what is best for the majority of the people. Most people do not know quality of an instrument or how well it will hold up. They find the best price for the smallest amount of money per month for the best quality. Could someone who is a professional musician find a good deal? Absolutely! The only problem is, people hear of someone who knew what they were doing, buying an instrument from someone who they went to college with, and was selling an instrument for cheap. Then all the other people think that they can do the same thing. I personally know of some people who have had to buy 2 instruments because the first one was not a quality instrument and wished they would have done it the right way first.

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But, by your logic, how do you know what you're getting from them isn't low quality (which it is, btw)?

 

Three examples -

 

1. kid gets drum kit from school provider. Puts everything together. Plays and plays. Takes kit to school only to find out that they didn't include the bolts to tighten up a joint. The kid had been playing with the drum head 90 degrees out of place. He didn't know better - he watched MTV.

 

2. kid gets drum kit from school provider. Kid plays bells. I happen to be there and asked why it sounded so bad. They didn't know and didn't know the piece that he was playing. I go look - he had the bells put together correctly - but the bells weren't cut correctly. So they didn't ring the correct tone. Bell set was HORRIBLY out of tune.

 

3. kid gets flute from school provider. Mom brings me the flute because daughter is having trouble with it. She knew that I played all through school including high school. I try to play it - yep, something's wrong. Start looking at it - the mouth piece wasn't milled correctly so it wouldn't vibrate correctly. I told her to take it back to them.

 

All of these are from the supposed experts. Are you really taking that much of chance buying a second hand instrument from a high school kid for a 1/3 or 1/4 of the cost?

 

Look - there are some folks that, time wise or comfort level, need to buy from the school providers. I get that. There is a market for that. But, what I'm saying is that you are NOT REQUIRED to buy from them, and there are reasons to consider NOT buying from them.

 

I won't just accept that somehow the school providers are sooo much more superior than any of venue of purchase.

 

Oh, and, BTW, my brother wasn't a professional musician when he was a kid. Neither one of my parents played anything other than church organ before we got into school. As a family, we own alot of instruments now (most from pawn shops). But, we got here because we took the time to listen and learn from folks, not just be lead down the path of least resistance.

Edited by Just thinkin' hard
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But, by your logic, how do you know what you're getting from them isn't low quality (which it is, btw)?

 

Three examples -

 

1. kid gets drum kit from school provider. Puts everything together. Plays and plays. Takes kit to school only to find out that they didn't include the bolts to tighten up a joint. The kid had been playing with the drum head 90 degrees out of place. He didn't know better - he watched MTV.

 

2. kid gets drum kit from school provider. Kid plays bells. I happen to be there and asked why it sounded so bad. They didn't know and didn't know the piece that he was playing. I go look - he had the bells put together correctly - but the bells weren't cut correctly. So they didn't ring the correct tone. Bell set was HORRIBLY out of tune.

 

3. kid gets flute from school provider. Mom brings me the flute because daughter is having trouble with it. She knew that I played all through school including high school. I try to play it - yep, something's wrong. Start looking at it - the mouth piece wasn't milled correctly so it wouldn't vibrate correctly. I told her to take it back to them.

 

All of these are from the supposed experts. Are you really taking that much of chance buying a second hand instrument from a high school kid for a 1/3 or 1/4 of the cost?

 

Look - there are some folks that, time wise or comfort level, need to buy from the school providers. I get that. There is a market for that. But, what I'm saying is that you are NOT REQUIRED to buy from them, and there are reasons to consider NOT buying from them.

 

I won't just accept that somehow the school providers are sooo much more superior than any of venue of purchase.

 

Oh, and, BTW, my brother wasn't a professional musician when he was a kid. Neither one of my parents played anything other than church organ before we got into school. As a family, we own alot of instruments now (most from pawn shops). But, we got here because we took the time to listen and learn from folks, not just be lead down the path of least resistance.

 

One local store in south Cobb sold a trumpet that had been painted gold with spray paint. It didn't work but looked good and and was dirt cheap.

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One local store in south Cobb sold a trumpet that had been painted gold with spray paint. It didn't work but looked good and and was dirt cheap.

 

You don't know when to give up. Are you related to former member?

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The only problem with that is, do you want to pay for a bad instrument now and have to still buy another one later or would you rather do it right the first time. As with anything, if you buy used you run a risk. The music companies your band director chooses are because over the long haul, they have the best prices.

 

 

Not a problem. If she loves it and sticks with it through high school, use the cheap one for marching band and get a good one for concerts and competitions. A lot of woodwinds do that to protect the felt and pads and cork from the outdoor elements. Many years ago I got my sax at Jennings in Marietta on Canton Hwy. My parents did a rent-to-own thing, probably paid double for it, but it was a good horn. I did upgrade to a Buescher for real playing a few years ago. If she doesn't like the cheap one you can put it back on Craig's list or eBay! Most music stores should repair any instrument regardless where you got it. The typical repairs for woodwinds are going to be replacing the pads and cork which isn't done on a routine or frequent basis, so I wouldn't worry about factoring that into the expense (if the rental place tries to sell you a repair warranty in addition to the instrument rental fee). Good luck and I hope she loves it! I did enjoy my time with band!

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It's no "racket".

If a school wants to buy a tuba for their band, the store will give the school the tuba for cost plus 10 or 20 percent. That means the school is using less tax money to purchase the tuba. Certain instruments are purchased by the school for the students to use in school due to their uniqueness and cost.

In Paulding County, there is very little budgeting for the bands and at some schools , almost nothing. Fundraisers and band booster clubs help provide the equipment. Carroll County, Douglas County, Cobb County are much more supportive.

 

WOW, what school are you at in Paulding county where there is tax money in a band budget???????

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