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Suicide - members of the military


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According to the attached link, suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for our troops. I have had several family members serve in the military, both in war time and peace time. My Brother in law was in the 1st gulf war and is currently under the care of a psychaitrist. My nephew was injured in Iraq and spent time at a hospital in Germany and at Walter Reed Medical Center. He's had to go through psycholical exams to make sure he's ok both physically and mentally. Further, two of my relatives that served in the army during the vietnam era struggled and eventually killed themselves.

 

I say all that to ask why isn't more being done to combat the emotional and psychological stress our troops are under? Can't we as a nation offer more help to those guys who were in the war zone who are having some problems? I've never walked in a war zone, but some of those brave men who have are forever scarred by the harsh reality of war.

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/military/story/2012-06-13/military-suicides/55585182/1

 

Since 2010, suicide has outpaced traffic accidents, heart disease, cancer, homicide and all other forms of death in the military besides combat, the report says. One in four non-combat deaths last year were servicemembers killing themselves.This is a real issue facing real families. Please maturely discuss a very difficult topic. I'm so ready for this war to be over.

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According to the attached link, suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for our troops. I have had several family members serve in the military, both in war time and peace time. My Brother in law was in the 1st gulf war and is currently under the care of a psychaitrist. My nephew was injured in Iraq and spent time at a hospital in Germany and at Walter Reed Medical Center. He's had to go through psycholical exams to make sure he's ok both physically and mentally. Further, two of my relatives that served in the army during the vietnam era struggled and eventually killed themselves.

 

I say all that to ask why isn't more being done to combat the emotional and psychological stress our troops are under? Can't we as a nation offer more help to those guys who were in the war zone who are having some problems? I've never walked in a war zone, but some of those brave men who have are forever scarred by the harsh reality of war.

 

http://www.usatoday....ides/55585182/1

 

Since 2010, suicide has outpaced traffic accidents, heart disease, cancer, homicide and all other forms of death in the military besides combat, the report says. One in four non-combat deaths last year were servicemembers killing themselves. This is a real issue facing real families. Please maturely discuss a very difficult topic. I'm so ready for this war to be over.

 

I don't have an answer, but I wish they would have a program in place for them and make it be required for those who are too 'proud' to go on their own.

 

My cousin just got back from Afghanistan... and he told that he still has the most realistic looking nightmares every night. :(

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We can agree on this AE. They are willing to go and fight for us, we should fight for them when they get back.

 

:clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::good::good::good::good::good::good::good:

 

I could not agree with you more.

My brother and brother in law have both been to the Middle East during war times. My brother has let me know that he has had some problems with some of the things he saw while he was over there.

 

This also terrifies the Everything out of me being that my son leaves for Navy Boot Camp in 17 days. I'm praying with all my might that he will be kept on his submarine and out of harms way.

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There is help aviliable. Please encourage your family member to seek it out. But, you must know they are the ones who have to go, they are the ones who have to understand they are not alone. I have been living the nightmare of being the wife of someone who lives with PTSD for 26yrs.

 

Here are some resources for the veterans,

 

http://www.va.gov/

 

http://www.oefoif.va.gov/

 

http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

 

http://www2.va.gov/directory/guide/vetcenter_flsh.asp

 

http://veterans.georgia.gov/cartersville?vgnextoid=7b677c5c038f7210VgnVCM100000bf01020aRCRD&vgnextchannel=1b50f0d1ca7f7210VgnVCM100000bf01020aRCRD

 

http://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/7019/va-task-force-looks-to-enlist-more-mental-health-clinicians/

 

 

These are just a few resources freely available to our veterans. These programs have existed for some time.

For us it took me giving my husband the checklist, and telling him to be honest with himself. He saw what I was talking about, and decided to get help.

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There is plenty of help out there, the problem is it so common for those with PTSD to refuse it or 'self medicate' which enhances the downward spiral.

 

But, that's just it. Those of us who love them have to keep pushing them to get the help they need. So often the very people who should be the support are also the ones that enable the destructive behavior. Don't misunderstand me. If you know the person is on this path, and you know that they are a vet, please, please encourage them to get the help they need. If you are the spouse/SO of the person, you call, and set up the appointment. Make them go.

 

http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/understanding_PTSD/understanding_PTSD.asp

 

Print out the symptoms. Check them off, tell the veteran you, and other loved ones see this. Help them get to the help they need. If they have children make them see how this affects the kids. Yes, there is secondary PTSD.

One other thing make sure they understand that getting the benefits for their service is NOT even the same as the "entitlements" that are so disparaged in the media, and on this board. They fought for them, they diserve them.

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Heartmath offers resources for active military, veterans and family members:

 

http://www.heartmath...e-programs.html

 

Be careful of any program that encourages the isolation of the vet. As that is one of the major issues that affects the PTSD suffer, and their loved ones.

There is not a one size fits all approach. This problem requires a professional relationship with a care provider.

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Be careful of any program that encourages the isolation of the vet. As that is one of the major issues that affects the PTSD suffer, and their loved ones.

There is not a one size fits all approach. This problem requires a professional relationship with a care provider.

 

I have no idea why you would mention encouraging isolation? It clearly states that Military Support is a "Team Effort." And is it is built on through research:

 

 

Military Trauma and HeartMath:

 

 

In a letter to HeartMath members, medically-retired Sergeant Michael Blair, U.S. Marines, wrote, “HeartMath changed my life, literally.” Blair served two combat tours in Iraq suffering amputation-threatening injuries to both his legs after running over a landmine.

 

 

Blair said when he uses HeartMath tools, such as Quick Coherence® (taught in the H.E.A.R.T. DVD), he can focus better, control his anger and more easily practice patience with his wife and daughters.

 

 

“It’s really hard to put into words all the ways that HeartMath has impacted me and my family,” he said.

 

 

Military Support is a Team Effort:

 

 

IHM is working hard to a help shorten the reintegration process for troops so they can transition back into their local communities and society quicker and with greater success. HeartMath programs and services are being applied in a variety of contexts, including for PTSD and pain management, family communication and other challenges they face during reintegration.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/institute-heartmath-debuts-dvd-military-sparks-movement-foster-110628132.html

 

 

 

 

H.E.A.R.T. Training DVD

 

The HeartMath Education and Resilience Training (H.E.A.R.T.) DVD and booklet is free for military service members, veterans or spouses. The H.E.A.R.T. DVD incorporates research-based self-regulation techniques and technologies to give you a better understanding of managing emotions and building resilience. This 3 ½ hour DVD provides you with practical tools to increase personal resilience, greater mental focus and improve performance and decision-making. The DVD presented by Retired Army Maj. Robert A. Bradley and Dr. Rollin McCraty discuss the unique challenges facing veterans and military personnel. The H.E.A.R.T. DVD will be available May 2012. If you are interested in receiving a free H.E.A.R.T. DVD for a military service member, veteran or spouse of one of these, click here for form.

 

http://www.heartmath.org/military-resources/veterans-service-members-spouses/resources.html

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Our cousin and friend Sgt. Chad Eppinette of the U.S. Army served 2 tours in Iraq and was shot and received a purple heart but came home to an emotional battle that none of us will ever fully understand took his own life last July. He left behind a son, wife and family that miss him every day. We tried to get him help but the VA just kept throwing medication at him that only made things worse. There is a documentary coming out made by the code of support foundation and he is featured in it. His wife is in Arlington Virgina right now to promote it and to tell Chad's story.

 

This is a link to a preview of the documentary if you are interested.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3EZGmX5OoA&feature=player_embedded

 

And this is the code of support foundation website.

 

http://codeofsupport.org/

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The program is based of through research:

 

H.E.A.R.T. Training DVD

 

The HeartMath Education and Resilience Training (H.E.A.R.T.) DVD and booklet is free for military service members, veterans or spouses. The H.E.A.R.T. DVD incorporates research-based self-regulation techniques and technologies to give you a better understanding of managing emotions and building resilience. This 3 ½ hour DVD provides you with practical tools to increase personal resilience, greater mental focus and improve performance and decision-making. The DVD presented by Retired Army Maj. Robert A. Bradley and Dr. Rollin McCraty discuss the unique challenges facing veterans and military personnel. The H.E.A.R.T. DVD will be available May 2012. If you are interested in receiving a free H.E.A.R.T. DVD for a military service member, veteran or spouse of one of these, click here for form.

As are all the programs at the VA, and Vet Centers.

Like I stated, be careful of anything that encourages isolation. Not everything can be healed with touchy feel good "therapy." I did check out the web site. You need to understand BFL I have been there done that. I know a lot of people who have tried the web stuff. The fact is they still ended up where the help in the form of a real live person is.

While this may be a tool that can be used, the vet still needs the guidance, and relationship of the professionals.

 

Do you know that the traumatic events actually changes the brain chemistry? It took years before we were able to find the right treatment for DH. Now thanks to the professionals at the VA (where this treatment is free) we have him on an even keel. It will take time, and a ton of love, and patience. to deal with this.

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Our cousin and friend Sgt. Chad Eppinette of the U.S. Army served 2 tours in Iraq and was shot and received a purple heart but came home to an emotional battle that none of us will ever fully understand took his own life last July. He left behind a son, wife and family that miss him every day. We tried to get him help but the VA just kept throwing medication at him that only made things worse. There is a documentary coming out made by the code of support foundation and he is featured in it. His wife is in Arlington Virgina right now to promote it and to tell Chad's story.

 

This is a link to a preview of the documentary if you are interested.

 

http://www.youtube.c...player_embedded

 

And this is the code of support foundation website.

 

http://codeofsupport.org/

They tried to do the same with DH. I was/an with him at every appointment. I am the one that lets the doctor know that the medication is working or not. I have figured out that the support system must be as involved as the veteran.

I am so sorry that your family has had to deal with this.

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As are all the programs at the VA, and Vet Centers.

Like I stated, be careful of anything that encourages isolation. Not everything can be healed with touchy feel good "therapy." I did check out the web site. You need to understand BFL I have been there done that. I know a lot of people who have tried the web stuff. The fact is they still ended up where the help in the form of a real live person is.

While this may be a tool that can be used, the vet still needs the guidance, and relationship of the professionals.

 

Do you know that the traumatic events actually changes the brain chemistry? It took years before we were able to find the right treatment for DH. Now thanks to the professionals at the VA (where this treatment is free) we have him on an even keel. It will take time, and a ton of love, and patience. to deal with this.

 

I know that Dr. Bruce Lipton says it goes a lot farther than just changes in brain chemistry. Of course, it's not limited to military type circumstances. It affects everyone:

 

With this body of knowledge comes promising news. According to Dr. Lipton, gene activity can change on a daily basis. If the perception in your mind is reflected in the chemistry of your body, and if your nervous system reads and interprets the environment and then controls the blood’s chemistry, then you can literally change the fate of your cells by altering your thoughts. In fact, Dr. Lipton’s research illustrates that by changing your perception, your mind can alter the activity of your genes and create over thirty thousand variations of products from each gene. He gives more detail by saying that the gene programs are contained within the nucleus of the cell, and you can rewrite those genetic programs through changing your blood chemistry.

 

http://www.brucelipton.com/articles/epigenetics/

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