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Red Wasps are everywhere! And they are MEAN!


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You are looking at my arch nemesis:

 

bbeast3-05.jpg

 

I HATE red wasps...These suckers are MEAN!!

 

They chase us around the yard, and dive-bomb unprovoked... It's gotten so bad that I have to take a tennis racket with me anytime I go outside! My neighbors probably think I've lost my mind running around the yard swinging a tennis racket at thin air. :lol:

 

Anyone know a good solution to keep these devils on their best behavior? (ie, the more dead the better) I hesitate to use the super-toxic chemicals as we have pets, so if there is a safer alternative that would be preferred.

 

And for the record, I'm not an "anti-bug" person at all... as long as they aren't threatening my safety and the enjoyment of my home they can stay as long as they like. ^_^

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I adore bees and I hate! hate! HATE!!! these guys. You have to constantly watch your back when they are around.

We use the stuff that sprays in a stream and get the pesky ones.

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Kill as many as you can, as they are overwintering fertilized queens coming out to look for a place to setup their nest. For every one you don't kill, you're looking at a nest full of wasps.

 

As for control, a decent can of wasp spray will do wonders. If they're in a place you'd rather not spray, I own two of these and they're FANTASTIC: http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page1420.html

 

I've bought many items from BugSpray.com . They're based right here in Georgia, too.

 

Disclaimer: I have no relationship whatsoever with these folks other than being a happy customer.

Edited by VoicesInMyHead
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I adore bees and I hate! hate! HATE!!! these guys. You have to constantly watch your back when they are around.

We use the stuff that sprays in a stream and get the pesky ones.

 

I'm with you there, I really hate red wasps. The foam spray that will reach out and cover the nest and expand works really well killing them. I keep honeybees and I've had these suckers on occasion try to enter my hives. The honeybees will just mob them, but they end up having a small chunk die fighting them off.

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Mean does not begin to describe these red wasps. Unfortunately one got in my house and we didn't see it. I was in the shower and all of a sudden felt pain on my abdomen that shouldn't have been there. It was the wasp and it got me good! It left an open sore about the size of the end of a small finger. The sting turned into a raised red spot as big as a softball and did not even begin to get better for about 3 days. I used baking soda and took benedril. Then after the redness went away it itched bad for another 3 days.

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They attack us too, or maybe they're hornets. Either way, I hate all stinging insects. Everyone says to leave them alone and they'll leave you alone, but the things are the size of...well, they're big. And gross. Would you just leave a roach alone?

 

No. Death to all of them. I'd drop a radioactive chemical if I thought it would ensure that I would never, ever, ever, have to deal with a pest again.

 

They also seem to be oddly attracted to my car. It's gold?

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I am on the warpath with these wasps this year....I don't go out the door without that stream spraying stuff that knocks them out of the air DEAD! I killed like 15 yesterday and so far today, I got about 7. I will not give up......they will be dead!

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You are looking at my arch nemesis:

 

bbeast3-05.jpg

 

I HATE red wasps...These suckers are MEAN!!

 

They chase us around the yard, and dive-bomb unprovoked... It's gotten so bad that I have to take a tennis racket with me anytime I go outside! My neighbors probably think I've lost my mind running around the yard swinging a tennis racket at thin air. :lol:

 

Anyone know a good solution to keep these devils on their best behavior? (ie, the more dead the better) I hesitate to use the super-toxic chemicals as we have pets, so if there is a safer alternative that would be preferred.

 

And for the record, I'm not an "anti-bug" person at all... as long as they aren't threatening my safety and the enjoyment of my home they can stay as long as they like. ^_^

 

 

Dirt Daubers as I call them. I have an old style camper shell on my truck. There are literally hundreds of them in the lining around the windows. I bombed the back of the truck 2 days ago, and they're already back. Luckily, they are very passive, and will almost never sting you or bite you unless you just make it unbearable for them.

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Dirt Daubers as I call them. I have an old style camper shell on my truck. There are literally hundreds of them in the lining around the windows. I bombed the back of the truck 2 days ago, and they're already back. Luckily, they are very passive, and will almost never sting you or bite you unless you just make it unbearable for them.

 

 

Subby, dirt daubers are different from a lot of other wasps:

 

Mud daubers are solitary wasps that construct small nests of mud in or around homes, sheds, and barns and under open structures, bridges and similar sites. Several species exist in Iowa. These wasps are long and slender with a narrow, thread-like waist. Some are a solid steel blue or black but others have additional yellow markings ...

 

After completing the mud nest the female captures several insects or spiders to provision the cells. Prey are stung and paralyzed before being placed in the nest. A single egg is deposited on the prey within each cell, and the cell sealed with mud. After the wasp has finished a series of cells, she departs and does not return. The larvae that hatch from the eggs feed on the prey items left by the adult wasp. New adult wasps emerge to start the process over again.

 

Wasps usually evoke a great deal of anxiety or fear. However, solitary wasps such as the mud daubers do not defend their nest the way social wasps such as hornets and yellowjackets do. Mud daubers are very unlikely to sting, even when thoroughly aroused. They may sting if mishandled.

 

Control of these insects is not warranted since they normally pose little threat. Rather, mud daubers should be regarded as beneficial, since they remove and use as prey many species of spiders which most people find disagreeable. The mud nests can be scraped off and discarded at night if they are objectionable, or wasp and hornet aerosol sprays can be used to treat nests if desired. There is no proven method that is effective in discouraging wasps from building nests in sheltered or protected areas. Prompt and frequent removal of nests is suggested in areas favored by the wasps. Pictures of the nests can be viewed here.

 

http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/iiin/bmuddaub.html

 

(Also, can someone tell me how to post a photo from another website; like the photo of the red wasp?)

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Subby, dirt daubers are different from a lot of other wasps:

 

Mud daubers are solitary wasps that construct small nests of mud in or around homes, sheds, and barns and under open structures, bridges and similar sites. Several species exist in Iowa. These wasps are long and slender with a narrow, thread-like waist. Some are a solid steel blue or black but others have additional yellow markings ...

 

After completing the mud nest the female captures several insects or spiders to provision the cells. Prey are stung and paralyzed before being placed in the nest. A single egg is deposited on the prey within each cell, and the cell sealed with mud. After the wasp has finished a series of cells, she departs and does not return. The larvae that hatch from the eggs feed on the prey items left by the adult wasp. New adult wasps emerge to start the process over again.

 

Wasps usually evoke a great deal of anxiety or fear. However, solitary wasps such as the mud daubers do not defend their nest the way social wasps such as hornets and yellowjackets do. Mud daubers are very unlikely to sting, even when thoroughly aroused. They may sting if mishandled.

 

Control of these insects is not warranted since they normally pose little threat. Rather, mud daubers should be regarded as beneficial, since they remove and use as prey many species of spiders which most people find disagreeable. The mud nests can be scraped off and discarded at night if they are objectionable, or wasp and hornet aerosol sprays can be used to treat nests if desired. There is no proven method that is effective in discouraging wasps from building nests in sheltered or protected areas. Prompt and frequent removal of nests is suggested in areas favored by the wasps. Pictures of the nests can be viewed here.

 

http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/iiin/bmuddaub.html

 

(Also, can someone tell me how to post a photo from another website; like the photo of the red wasp?)

 

 

Exactly...that's why we never got stung by one. Yellow Jackets (Vespula Wasps) are probably the most agreesive, right up there with Hornets. But I still think Yellow Jackets are worse.

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They attack us too, or maybe they're hornets. Either way, I hate all stinging insects. Everyone says to leave them alone and they'll leave you alone, but the things are the size of...well, they're big. And gross. Would you just leave a roach alone?

 

No. Death to all of them. I'd drop a radioactive chemical if I thought it would ensure that I would never, ever, ever, have to deal with a pest again.

 

They also seem to be oddly attracted to my car. It's gold?

My car is green and they go in and out under the hood and the mirrors when it's parked.

I have noticed in the last week that even the smallest crack in your car window at a red light is a challenge because they hang out at red lights and will try their best to get in the car.

FYI - You have to swat at them until your window closes and they move faster than than the window goes up.

They are horrible.

I went to Dollar Tree and bought a badminton racket to swat at all the bee breeds on the back deck. They only problem is the strings are a little too far apart and if you smack a bumble bee it get's stuck, then you get stuck with a pissed off bee. :blink:

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ugh going to have nightmares. I've noticed these things everywhere lately and wondered what they were. I've never seen a red bee before. Brake cleaner works good for killing bugs. I spray the fat fuzzy bees with it when they attack me.

 

Someone mentioned the tennis racket electrical thing, my mom has/had one and it worked good. I may get myself a few. I appreciate the link, wasn't sure where to get em.

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Finding there nest is usually possible and helps a lot. You can also treat the shrubs and areas of the home where they tend to spend most of their time and it will adequately repel them from the area. They are definitely on the move.

 

 

I dont know about that. Finding a nest is pretty easy but this time of year its nearly impossible. As a pest control company I dont think you should be advising people to spray the bushes as pollinating bee's are there. Honey bees are protected and treating bushes while they are flowering or when honey bees are present is illegal. Check your employee handbook. As a pest control company working under the rules and regs of Ga I would be very cautious about what you post on here and what you pubicly tell civilians to do. I would look over both the employee handbook, FIFRA, and the Pesticide application act before posting things like this.

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Okay folks....MOST of these insects are completely benign. You don't have to wage a war on them, like the US does on anything it doesn't like (or can secretly make LOTS of money from) :lol:....

 

Just know a few things...most wasps are meat eaters, so they will show up when you're grilling meat or something. They have no interest in you, or harming you. However, if you SQUISH one (especially yeller jackets) the blood (or bee juice, whatever) that squirts out of their bodies when smashed, gives off a chemical smell that will make the rest of the tribe VERY aggressive!!! Spattering a wasp is just an alarm to the rest of the nest to hunt and seek the enemy.

 

Carpenter bees are probably the least of all aggressive of them all. But they can cause significant structural damage to decks and other wood structures. The only real way to keep those guys at bay is to use paint or certain stains/sealants on the deck.

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Okay folks....MOST of these insects are completely benign. You don't have to wage a war on them, like the US does on anything it doesn't like (or can secretly make LOTS of money from) :lol:....

 

Just know a few things...most wasps are meat eaters, so they will show up when you're grilling meat or something. They have no interest in you, or harming you. However, if you SQUISH one (especially yeller jackets) the blood (or bee juice, whatever) that squirts out of their bodies when smashed, gives off a chemical smell that will make the rest of the tribe VERY aggressive!!! Spattering a wasp is just an alarm to the rest of the nest to hunt and seek the enemy.

 

Carpenter bees are probably the least of all aggressive of them all. But they can cause significant structural damage to decks and other wood structures. The only real way to keep those guys at bay is to use paint or certain stains/sealants on the deck.

 

Actually, most of the sealants and paints today are user/environmentally safe. Therefore, carpenter bees dont care what you put on the wood. They dont actually eat the wood so no stains will readily repel them or kill them. I have seen them burrow into cedar, stained decks, and painted, solid wood doors. Also, just for educational purposes, the bald faced hornet(Very aggresive, makes large paper nests in the shape of a football) is actually a wasp. The yellow jacket is also a wasp. The European hornet(Also very aggressive) is a true hornet. The red wasps you see are called paper wasps or umbrella wasps and are not very aggressive unless disturbed.

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Actually, most of the sealants and paints today are user/environmentally safe. Therefore, carpenter bees dont care what you put on the wood. They dont actually eat the wood so no stains will readily repel them or kill them. I have seen them burrow into cedar, stained decks, and painted, solid wood doors. Also, just for educational purposes, the bald faced hornet(Very aggresive, makes large paper nests in the shape of a football) is actually a wasp. The yellow jacket is also a wasp. The European hornet(Also very aggressive) is a true hornet. The red wasps you see are called paper wasps or umbrella wasps and are not very aggressive unless disturbed.

 

Sealants were not my first choice, but I have used certain paints on my trim when I lived in Marietta that the bees would not touch...although they would fly around and check it out. Also had my trim painted here at my home in PC, and same thing...NO carpenter bees. I'll have to ask my painter what kind he used, but he said that the bees would not get through it....and he was right.

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Sealants were not my first choice, but I have used certain paints on my trim when I lived in Marietta that the bees would not touch...although they would fly around and check it out. Also had my trim painted here at my home in PC, and same thing...NO carpenter bees. I'll have to ask my painter what kind he used, but he said that the bees would not get through it....and he was right.

 

 

You may be correct. If you find out, please let me know. I know that when lead paint was used the bees would not burrow as much. Of course that is not legal anymore. I also heard of people mixing gas/diesel into the gas and that helped as well. Again, please let me know. I could help out my customers plus make alot of money with that type of info.

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You may be correct. If you find out, please let me know. I know that when lead paint was used the bees would not burrow as much. Of course that is not legal anymore. I also heard of people mixing gas/diesel into the gas and that helped as well. Again, please let me know. I could help out my customers plus make alot of money with that type of info.

 

I'll find out and let you know. It was not lead based, as this was only 3 years ago when I had it painted. But the guy is a genius!!! He knows all about this stuff. I can tell you one thing- this paint was XXXXpensive!~! ;) But it's only for the trim. The base paint on the siding is not a problem because it's not thick enough for bees to use (and they know this....WOW!). I know he used Duron on the siding. Carpenter bees will only burrow into something that is a certain thickness, and most siding does not come close to that. 2x4's are their favorite homes.

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Exactly...that's why we never got stung by one. Yellow Jackets (Vespula Wasps) are probably the most agreesive, right up there with Hornets. But I still think Yellow Jackets are worse.

 

I don't think we are speaking about the same bug. The red wasps, or Mahogany wasps as some people call them, are vicious and aggressive. My mom was randomly attacked by them last year, and actually had to jump in a nearby pond to get them to leave off of her. She was stung 14 times in total, and each sting swelled up to a bit larger than a golf ball. We tried to get her to go to the hospital, but she refused. She basically was bed ridden for several days before they started to go go away. I was at her house today, after having had them exterminated last year, where we destroyed 3 nests, and they have come back, and chased us out of the back yard.

 

These things are vicious and evil, and must be killed by any means necessary. If anyone has a good method of locating all the nests and destroying them, please let me know. My method last year obviously didn't get them all.

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I don't think we are speaking about the same bug. The red wasps, or Mahogany wasps as some people call them, are vicious and aggressive. My mom was randomly attacked by them last year, and actually had to jump in a nearby pond to get them to leave off of her. She was stung 14 times in total, and each sting swelled up to a bit larger than a golf ball. We tried to get her to go to the hospital, but she refused. She basically was bed ridden for several days before they started to go go away. I was at her house today, after having had them exterminated last year, where we destroyed 3 nests, and they have come back, and chased us out of the back yard.

 

These things are vicious and evil, and must be killed by any means necessary. If anyone has a good method of locating all the nests and destroying them, please let me know. My method last year obviously didn't get them all.

 

I reckon not then...I mean those dirt daubers that invade my camper shell. They never bother me.

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Yep, looks like I'm going to have to invest in some highly-toxic bug poison...

 

These suckers are WAY worse this year than I ever remember them being.

 

I have never had to carry a tennis racket every time I take the dogs out to potty, check the mail, or walk to my car. It's ridiculous!

 

I noticed them going underneath one of our shingles on our roof, so that is where their nest might be hiding. I also think they may have one in our gutter down-spout.

 

Thanks for all the tips. I'm glad that there are others that despise these things as much as I do!

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I dont know about that. Finding a nest is pretty easy but this time of year its nearly impossible. As a pest control company I dont think you should be advising people to spray the bushes as pollinating bee's are there. Honey bees are protected and treating bushes while they are flowering or when honey bees are present is illegal. Check your employee handbook. As a pest control company working under the rules and regs of Ga I would be very cautious about what you post on here and what you pubicly tell civilians to do. I would look over both the employee handbook, FIFRA, and the Pesticide application act before posting things like this.

 

If you need to spray your bushes for something, then please do it after sunset. At least then the honeybees won't be on them. Even something as simple as putting seven dust on bushes can end up being carried by the honeybees back to their nest and wipe out the entire colony. Happened to a fellow I know's beehives - 70,000+ honeybees wiped out overnight. The benefits of having the honeybees pollinate those flowers vastly outweighed the minor damage done by a few harmful bugs. Thats the reason alot of helpful or harmless insects aren't seen very much anymore.

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If you need to spray your bushes for something, then please do it after sunset. At least then the honeybees won't be on them. Even something as simple as putting seven dust on bushes can end up being carried by the honeybees back to their nest and wipe out the entire colony. Happened to a fellow I know's beehives - 70,000+ honeybees wiped out overnight. The benefits of having the honeybees pollinate those flowers vastly outweighed the minor damage done by a few harmful bugs. Thats the reason alot of helpful or harmless insects aren't seen very much anymore.

 

I am with you, I am cringing at the post about people killing bees.

When people wipe out enough pollinators you can potentially cause a famine.

I also wanted to ask you about keeping bees on my own property, I am not very interested in bee keeping but I would like to help out in sustaining the population.

Is it possible for me to just put one on my property and leave it? or would it require me to tend it?

As I have said I don't see them here and I am afraid that living in a subdivision they have been wiped pretty much out in my area by the use of pesticides.

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I dont know about that. Finding a nest is pretty easy but this time of year its nearly impossible. As a pest control company I dont think you should be advising people to spray the bushes as pollinating bee's are there. Honey bees are protected and treating bushes while they are flowering or when honey bees are present is illegal. Check your employee handbook. As a pest control company working under the rules and regs of Ga I would be very cautious about what you post on here and what you pubicly tell civilians to do. I would look over both the employee handbook, FIFRA, and the Pesticide application act before posting things like this.

 

 

"civilians" ie those not in the pest control business can do as they please when it comes to pest control...the label is the law

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I am with you, I am cringing at the post about people killing bees.

When people wipe out enough pollinators you can potentially cause a famine.

I also wanted to ask you about keeping bees on my own property, I am not very interested in bee keeping but I would like to help out in sustaining the population.

Is it possible for me to just put one on my property and leave it? or would it require me to tend it?

As I have said I don't see them here and I am afraid that living in a subdivision they have been wiped pretty much out in my area by the use of pesticides.

 

PM Sent, but really there isn't too much work involved with just a few hives. The suggestion is to run two, so if you have a problem with one, you can pull from another one (queen loss, need extra frames of brood/honey, etc). They even make some smaller size hives like 8 frames that are easier to lift, and you can extract honey (if you want) with just common household tools. I believe there are some smaller "garden hives" that would work as well, you can even paint them up to be decorative.

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i have green and yellow bushes lining my front porch and those stupid wasps love them, it gets worse every year. does anyone know of a repellant i can put on them? i would hate to soake the bushes with cans of wasp killer, but i may just do that.

 

 

they are eating the aphids off the bushes as well all wasp /carpenter bees are starting to polonate(sp) this time of year as well.

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I dont know about that. Finding a nest is pretty easy but this time of year its nearly impossible. As a pest control company I dont think you should be advising people to spray the bushes as pollinating bee's are there. Honey bees are protected and treating bushes while they are flowering or when honey bees are present is illegal. Check your employee handbook. As a pest control company working under the rules and regs of Ga I would be very cautious about what you post on here and what you pubicly tell civilians to do. I would look over both the employee handbook, FIFRA, and the Pesticide application act before posting things like this.

 

ive heard this but have not seen it in the department of ag rules and regulations. ive been looking. can you point me in the right direction. also isnt fifra the fedreal insecticide and rodentcide act?

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ive heard this but have not seen it in the department of ag rules and regulations. ive been looking. can you point me in the right direction. also isnt fifra the fedreal insecticide and rodentcide act?

 

 

Its in the employee handbook. FIFRA - Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. I dont believe you will find anything about bees in the act. I was just putting it out there.

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"civilians" ie those not in the pest control business can do as they please when it comes to pest control...the label is the law

 

 

Not completely true. If someone not in the industry contaminates a water source I'm pretty sure the Dept. of Ag will be all over his ass. I would also advise any licensed pest control to not tell customers things that are not completely legal. Especially in a very public manner. What about Pest/Nuisance Wildlife? Would you tell your customers to "Go ahead and shoot that woodpecker thats tearing up your fascia. Nothing will happen to you"? If you do, you are completely wrong.

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They attack us too, or maybe they're hornets. Either way, I hate all stinging insects. Everyone says to leave them alone and they'll leave you alone, but the things are the size of...well, they're big. And gross. Would you just leave a roach alone?

 

No. Death to all of them. I'd drop a radioactive chemical if I thought it would ensure that I would never, ever, ever, have to deal with a pest again.

 

They also seem to be oddly attracted to my car. It's gold?

 

Mine too!! I come out everyafternoon after work and there is always one lurking that flys off after I start the engine. I'vehad to quit leaving my windows down and suffer through any heat bc I don't want him IN the car.

My car is a Ford tthat is a brownish gold color.

THEY SUCK~!

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We have these in our heat/ac ducts, every year. I've already seen one so far this spring. Yes, I carry TWO epipens everyhere I go. I use to only carry them about a week after my allergy shots. Then, when I heard about the man in Clayton County, dying because someone had served him a shellfish dish by mistake, and he was allergic to shellfish, he died. I carry them all of the time, now. IF, someone in the restaurant would have had an epipen, he may not have died!! You just never know when you or someone else may need it. I do know that it's illegal to use someone elses medicines but, IF it will save a life, I DON'T CARE!!!

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We have them too. My kids don't even want to go outside! It seems like every day there is one that gets inside but luckily our cat is a fabulous wasp hunter. :) I don't know how, but he disables them so they can't fly and then leaves them crawling around in the same spot for one of us to kill. How he does that with no front claws is beyond me...

 

(ETA: Our cat was declawed when we got him from the shelter)

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