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Social Security Act Title IV-D and Title V-E bankrupting Social Security


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#1 Domestic Violence by Proxy

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 04:37 PM

I think Pubby asked me to document this. So I don't forget, I started this thread.

 

Social Security Act Title IV-D ties into child support enforcement. How? States are incentized to collect child support because they are given 66 cents on the dollar for each dollar of child support collected. Those matching funds come from social security. 

 

Title V-E incentivizes taking children from parents. We'll get into how later.

 

Below is a good article that summizes how the Domestic Violence Industry gets into the act. DV shelters need statistics. Without statistics, they lose federal funding. Without federal funding jobs are lost. This is the reason DV shelters are so aggressive even if there is no evidence of abuse.

 

 

One of the best explanations of this is at the link below.

https://nationalpare...le-iv-d-program


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#2 PUBBY

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:49 PM

The nut of the issue is that the way funding for shelters and some other welfare, child services programs are funded with a federal matching grant that is based on collection of child support from non-custodial parents, the states have an incentive to hype the collections.

 

The presumed fix is that parenting be more equally shared in the wake of divorce as the charge is the judges, in mediating typical divorces, side toward unbalanced custody agreements and do so to increase collection of child support.  This impacts primarily single parent families where the custodial parent is on some sort of family assistance presumably because the non-custodial parent is not paying the court ordered child support.  This, at least in my understanding, is the only time that the state assumes the role of collection agent for child support.

 

While I do see the issue with the incentives being off and acknowledge that there is a historical bias toward the mother in child custody but it remains a bit of a stretch that judges are motivated to increase the amounts of uncollected child support so the enforcement parts of the system can get more collections to generate more federal funds for state programs.

 

The point is while the article is suggestive of the nature of the problem and the solution offered - more equal custodial arrangements - justifiable on its face;  the article does not present the facts to prove that the system of child custody collections is corrupt and that corruption is bankrupting Social Security.  It may be a matter of the journalism which seemed to be oriented toward a more open mind in regard to custodial arrangements.

 

Indeed, one of the headlines next to article reads: Ohio’s child support system rife with fraud, poor collection rates which would suggest that, at least in the case of Ohio, the state is lax in collections and is institutionally failing to 'game the system' in the way suggested. In another article an Illinois state's attorney's office closed the group in his office responsible for tracking and collecting child support even though the program was in part federally funded.

 

If this represented a deep conspiracy, those actors in those locales would not be bolting from the system.

 

pubby



#3 Domestic Violence by Proxy

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 12:17 AM

The nut of the issue is that the way funding for shelters and some other welfare, child services programs are funded with a federal matching grant that is based on collection of child support from non-custodial parents, the states have an incentive to hype the collections.

 

The presumed fix is that parenting be more equally shared in the wake of divorce as the charge is the judges, in mediating typical divorces, side toward unbalanced custody agreements and do so to increase collection of child support.  This impacts primarily single parent families where the custodial parent is on some sort of family assistance presumably because the non-custodial parent is not paying the court ordered child support.  This, at least in my understanding, is the only time that the state assumes the role of collection agent for child support.

 

While I do see the issue with the incentives being off and acknowledge that there is a historical bias toward the mother in child custody but it remains a bit of a stretch that judges are motivated to increase the amounts of uncollected child support so the enforcement parts of the system can get more collections to generate more federal funds for state programs.

 

The point is while the article is suggestive of the nature of the problem and the solution offered - more equal custodial arrangements - justifiable on its face;  the article does not present the facts to prove that the system of child custody collections is corrupt and that corruption is bankrupting Social Security.  It may be a matter of the journalism which seemed to be oriented toward a more open mind in regard to custodial arrangements.

 

Indeed, one of the headlines next to article reads: Ohio’s child support system rife with fraud, poor collection rates which would suggest that, at least in the case of Ohio, the state is lax in collections and is institutionally failing to 'game the system' in the way suggested. In another article an Illinois state's attorney's office closed the group in his office responsible for tracking and collecting child support even though the program was in part federally funded.

 

If this represented a deep conspiracy, those actors in those locales would not be bolting from the system.

 

pubby

Patience Pubby, I'm just getting warmed up. This isn't something that's new and I can't rush through it. It's been going on for decades in all 50 states. There is more to it than just this article. If you remember Georgia State Senator Nancy Schaefer spoke on the corruption of CPS and many think she is dead because of it. I won't go into details but her death is shrouded in mystery. There is plenty about her speeches on youtube.

 

In the meantime, here is an edutainment piece I've posted before.


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#4 El Zorro

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 07:54 AM

This is another example of a government program with "good intentions" gone awry.  AFDC was created in I believe 1935 and paid for with funding from Social Security.


Golly gee willickers.

#5 PUBBY

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 03:55 PM

I recognize the concept of regulatory capture.  Among the most egregious ever has been the capture of institutions like the EPA by Pruitt; an industry shill if I ever saw one.

 

These institutions, one might observe, have gone down hill in the last years as we have elected politicians who believed their main task was to destroy government and have adopted the tactic of maladministration as their primary tool. How better to destroy an institution that put people in office whose goal is destroy that office by perverting the task.

 

Hell, even the DEA has been 'captured' by the biggest drug dealers on earth - one being a top five fortune 500 company.  The obvious purpose of doing so was to do their best to turn doctors offices into the 21st century version of the opium dens of Shanghai. 

 

We might ask "Why?  Why would they do this?"

 

Could it be that they figure if 300,000 Americans can be turned into dope zombies and die every year, they can save money on medicare for millions as killing folks with dope is a quick and easy way to dispose of folks ... and allow the rich even greater tax breaks.

 

Oh, and on the tax reform;  get ready to bend over because like any 'Republican' tax reform, the middle class is probably looking at an increase while the rich walk away with the gold.

 

Trump, who is an oligarch, may have talked the talk of the populists but hey, facts are proving him to be the biggest liar currently walking the earth.

 

pubby



#6 PUBBY

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 04:48 PM

Patience Pubby, I'm just getting warmed up. This isn't something that's new and I can't rush through it. It's been going on for decades in all 50 states. There is more to it than just this article. If you remember Georgia State Senator Nancy Schaefer spoke on the corruption of CPS and many think she is dead because of it. I won't go into details but her death is shrouded in mystery. There is plenty about her speeches on youtube.

 

In the meantime, here is an edutainment piece I've posted before.

 

Your video I'm sure depicts the circumstances that exist in some places. It is not unreasonable to think that some folks are base enough to abuse the system in this way but I do think that it is a mistake to assume that the entire society is as corrupt as portrayed. 

 

I mean such a system were as corrupt as you say and in play nationwide there would be not only ample evidence - I'm sure there is some but I'm talking about a lot of evidence and the most telling bit would be the shouts of tens of thousands of people in the street.

 

And while I know that perfection eludes all including those in the justice system, the enormity of the conspiracy you're suggesting would be impossible to keep under wraps.

 

Right now, given the scope and enormity of the corruption you're portraying, you're going to have to actually document it or take some lessons from Alex Jones on conspiracy theory promotion to get the story to the next level. A comic book type video provides no substance to the allegations. I mean at least Jones went to the Bilderberg retreat.

 

pubby



#7 CitizenCain

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 05:35 PM

 I don't think you need to look as far as Alex Jones to see conspiracies in out of control government programs that end up punishing citizens and enriching local governments, In fact you only need to go as far as I-75 and see the highway robbery conducted by hordes of local police agencies praying on travelers who make the mistake of carrying cash on their persons. 

 

 

( I apologize in advance for changing the subject, sorta) 

 

GOD BLESS AMERICA 


  • TJB and october like this
"Every critic, every detractor, will have to bow down to President Trump,"
 
 

 
 

 

#8 PUBBY

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 08:26 PM

CC:

That particular game didn't come to mind because, well, the directness seems less conspiratorial and more highway robberish in nature :)

 

I will say that DVbp's post was provocative enough that I not only viewed a couple more videos but read a rather interesting Congressional Research Service report on the subject of incarceration of those who are being coerced to pay child support.  It does go to the issue of what makes sense and doesn't in the collection of child support which is more broadly applied than I was immediately aware.

 

Child Support enforcement was initially limited to children whose custodial parent was on welfare but by the late 1970s had been extended to all parents who request the state do the job of collecting because of non-payment.

 

The report does make the suggestion that the current system relies too heavily on incarceration snagging the few 'deadbeat' dads but a significantly larger number of just poor dads and confounds and complicates their ability to pay by incarceration by both civil and criminal sanctions - often based on contempt of court.

 

Further it suggests that some of the arrears could be mitigated by the dads providing child care services which earn credit against child support payments, which seems imminently sensible when it makes sense.

 

Here is the link to the well annotated brief which, being a CRS publication, is relatively unbiased in its review.  In that same location (greenbook for the House Ways and Means committee, which ordered the report from the Library of Congress, there is a relatively exhaustive legislative history of the child support collection system, its reimbursement ratios which change with the congress, and the expansion and centralization of the enforcement process.) 

 

One thing I did notice is that while there were audit procedures enacted in the original legislation and those procedures were intensified later; most auditing of programs were repealed by the early 1980s.

 

Frankly, it would seem that the house oversight committees resources would have been much better spent on behalf of the average American citizen had their efforts been directed at oversight of programs of this type than by holding eleven different investigations of Benghazi; the only reasonable explanation for the final ten having been an effort to knock HRC's approval ratings from over 67% to a level that virtually assured we'd get an unknown ass in the white house.

 

As an aside, there were a variety of quotes in some of the videos, one of which cited Shakespeare, however they left off possibly the most incendiary quote from the bard - that being "First, kill all the lawyers" for which I give them credit.

 

pubby



#9 PUBBY

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:37 AM

I suppose another concern is that with private prisons, the judicial system's penchant to become a marketing arm using an area of the criminal justice system that is potentially more corrupt is another concern.

 

This from an editorial in the NYTimes regarding the penchant of municipal courts to extract money for their cities is an obvious source of injustice.

 

 

Toward the end of the Obama administration, the Justice Department called on judges to end the cash-register system of justice that had taken root across the country. In what is a clearly unconstitutional practice, people in localities nationwide were being sent to jail solely because they were too poor to pay the fines and fees that municipalities increasingly rely on for revenue.

 

Some states heeded the advice, and progress was made. Now, a report from the United States Commission on Civil Rights shows what the Trump Justice Department needs to do to keep the momentum up for reform.

 

I think we know that the Justice Dept. headed by Jeffrey Beauregard Sessions will turn a blind eye to this abuse.

 

Then, of course, there is the continuing issue with how citizens are treated in some cases by LEO.

 

All of this involves the judicial branch of government.  I think justice is, was and will be the a key issue going forward. All citizens deserve a working, honest and equitable justice system.  The focus of the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth amendments of the Constitution are requirements that directly address the nation's legal system.

 

I actually had great hope when I was younger that we would progress in this area and under the Warren Court there was. But along came that originalist who demanded the document be fixed in time to the community standards of 1790 ... when cruel was boiling in oil and unusual was having a mattress, a finished floor, heating, air conditioning and indoor plumbing.

 

When you consider that slavery is legal in the context of prisoners, the rapid expansion of the numbers of people incarcerated in the US coincides with the expansion and growing influence of the prison-industrial complex.

 

I was looking on youtube for the Robert Preston version from the Music Man of "we got trouble right here in river city" when I came across this 'parody' of the song and about fell out of my chair.  You should view it :)

 

 

pubby



#10 Domestic Violence by Proxy

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 07:07 AM

 

Your video I'm sure depicts the circumstances that exist in some places. It is not unreasonable to think that some folks are base enough to abuse the system in this way but I do think that it is a mistake to assume that the entire society is as corrupt as portrayed. 

 

I mean such a system were as corrupt as you say and in play nationwide there would be not only ample evidence - I'm sure there is some but I'm talking about a lot of evidence and the most telling bit would be the shouts of tens of thousands of people in the street.

 

And while I know that perfection eludes all including those in the justice system, the enormity of the conspiracy you're suggesting would be impossible to keep under wraps.

 

Right now, given the scope and enormity of the corruption you're portraying, you're going to have to actually document it or take some lessons from Alex Jones on conspiracy theory promotion to get the story to the next level. A comic book type video provides no substance to the allegations. I mean at least Jones went to the Bilderberg retreat.

 

pubby

 

More money flows through family courts than all other courts combined. Watch the movie Divorce Corp. 

 


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#11 Domestic Violence by Proxy

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 07:19 AM

All you have to do is follow the money. The corruptions permeates everything but no one wants to hear about divorce. You don't find out how corrupt family court is until you're in it. There is nothing I can say that this movie doesn't cover. They could have done a better job with Social Security but just about all else is covered. It's out on DVD. It was on Netflix but special interests got it removed.

 


Edited by Domestic Violence by Proxy, 18 October 2017 - 07:29 AM.

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#12 PUBBY

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:18 PM

I understand the general public's aversion to divorce as a topic.  That aversion equates to ignorance of the entire system - people just don't know how being vindictive in a divorce can create utter hell for all parties.  Those who go through it are usually too traumatized to talk about it.

 

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