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“Last Days in Vietnam”

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I really want to see this. Vietman is part of my life, I bid goodbye to 2 cousins and several friends headed to Vietman and was thankful when they all came home safe.

 

I also had the pleasure in the eighties of knowing a family from South Vietnam that were fortunate enough to hitch a ride on one of the last helicopters when Siagon collapsed. I heard lots of interesting stories.

 

 

 

 

Rory Kennedy sheds light on America’s ‘Last Days in Vietnam’ in her Oscar-nominated documentary

By Bianna Golodryga
11 hours ago

Yahoo News

 

In her latest documentary, “Last Days in Vietnam,” director and producer Rory Kennedy takes viewers on a 98-minute, riveting journey about the final hours of the evacuation of Saigon. From a war that spanned two decades and has been the subject of numerous films (both Hollywood blockbusters and documentaries), Kennedy has chosen to home in on a few precious hours that would shape the course of history and millions of lives.

 

 

 

rest of the story and a short video

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/oscar-nominated-last-days-in-vietnam-021344425.html

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Shouldn't it be "Kennedy has chosen to HONE in on a few precious hours?"

 

Just curious.

 

 

 

Edited to add: It does sound like an interesting documentary, that just caught my eye in the excerpt from the article.

Edited by Blondiega1
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Well, I found this, so I guess it's debatable............ :p

 

 

 

 

Often people misuse the word “hone” by placing it in sentences where it doesn’t belong, but it’s a simple confusion that can be cleared up by understanding its definition.

 

The verb “hone” means “to sharpen or make more acute,” as in honing a talent. Alfred honed his negotiation skills to buy a new car at a very reasonable price. I hone my abs by doing 100 sit-ups a day.Generally, people drop it into sentences where they should use “home.”

 

In verb form, “home” (as in “to home in on”) means “to move or be aimed toward a destination or target with great accuracy.” Missiles home in on targets. The leftfielder homed in on the fly ball. “Forget about the abs!” I said as I homed in on a mouth-watering candy bar.

 

As a simple rule of thumb, if you write the sentence and need the phrase “in on” after the verb, it’s most likely “home.” If not, you probably need to use “hone.”

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Well, I found this, so I guess it's debatable............ :p

 

 

 

 

Often people misuse the word “hone” by placing it in sentences where it doesn’t belong, but it’s a simple confusion that can be cleared up by understanding its definition.

 

The verb “hone” means “to sharpen or make more acute,” as in honing a talent. Alfred honed his negotiation skills to buy a new car at a very reasonable price. I hone my abs by doing 100 sit-ups a day.Generally, people drop it into sentences where they should use “home.”

 

In verb form, “home” (as in “to home in on”) means “to move or be aimed toward a destination or target with great accuracy.” Missiles home in on targets. The leftfielder homed in on the fly ball. “Forget about the abs!” I said as I homed in on a mouth-watering candy bar.

 

As a simple rule of thumb, if you write the sentence and need the phrase “in on” after the verb, it’s most likely “home.” If not, you probably need to use “hone.”

 

 

Oh Heck!!!

Now we need to start a whole new thread for this debate!! :lol:

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HA! :D Apparently it is a North American thing. ;)

 

Home in vs. hone in

Home in means to direct on a target. The phrasal verb derives from the 19th-century use of homing pigeons, but it resurged in the 20th century to refer to missiles that home in on their targets. It’s also commonly used metaphorically, where to home in on something is to focus on and make progress toward it.

Hone in began as an alteration of home in, and many people regard it as an error. It is a very common, though, especially in the U.S. and Canada—so common that many dictionaries now list it—and there are arguments in its favor. Hone means to sharpen or to perfect, and we can think of homing in as a sharpening of focus or a perfecting of one’s trajectory toward a target. So while it might not make strict logical sense, extending hone this way is not a huge leap.

Outside North America, home in prevails by a huge margin. It also prevails in North America, but only by a ratio of about two to one. Hone in is common even in technical, scientific, and military contexts, where one might expect home in to prevail. A few American and Canadian publishers clearly favor home in as a matter of policy, but most apparently have no strictly enforced policy one way or the other.

 

http://grammarist.com/eggcorns/home-in-hone-in/

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" Sad Movies Always Make me Cry"

 

I don't think that I could watch that program, it hurts to bad to remember and then watch what happened after the Democrats betrayed the people of South Vietnam and caused them to flee their homeland. So many thousands

died durning the boatlift, from pirates,of thrirst and hunger and drowned when their boats sank, or were killed and died in the re-education camps set up by the communists after the fall of Siagon. And don't forget the 1/3rd of the population of Cambodia killed by the Kalmer Rouge.

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