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Emory/Wellstar Health System?

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WellStar Health System and Emory University are in discussions to create a combined organization that would bring nearly a dozen hospitals under a single umbrella.

 

Full story: http://bit.ly/16VtAhJ

 

http://bit.ly/1vly4nC

 

This is too early, they are still discussing it. Is this good idea that both hospital systems are combined?

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Well, from where I sit, it is a "thinking outside the box" to address our health insurance maladies.

 

They would basically be self insured from those who join THEIR system.

 

I like the idea, because it would combine one of the best Cardiovascular Groups [Dr Harvey Sacks, et al, with Wellstar Cardiovascular] and hospital groups, with Emory, who has the best Orthopedic-Spinal Groups. They are the best on hip replacements, knees, etc., which Wellstar does NOT have as part of their present group. Pinnacle and Resurgeons both do procedures at Wellstar, but are not an actual part of their system.

 

Our providers, like Wellstar and Emory are going to have to get creative to survive in this new marketplace, and this appears to me to be a good way to start dealing with the new rules and regulations from the Affordable Care Act.

 

I hope it works out, and only wish it had already been in place for my right hip last June and my left hip December 2.

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Wellstar is currently offering insurance plans jointly with Piedmont Hospital, so I wondered why they didn't merge.

 

What I have heard from similar arrangements like Wellstar/Emory is that you might now have to go down to Emory for some procedures instead of staying local.

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I have no use for Dr. Harvey Sacks. He did an echo on me, found an aortic arch aneurysm and said he wanted to watch it for a year. If he did anything, he would "just wrap it". My wife didn't agree and talked with the doctor she worked for. He got me an appointment with his cardiologist at Emory.

 

I ended up going to Emory and got the best cardiologist and the best surgeon, and they did emergency surgery to replace the arch with a graft. I asked if they could just wrap it like Dr Sacks said. The Emory surgeon told me that they haven't 'wrapped' an aneurysm in many years - that was a very old method of treatment. The doctor told me after the procedure that if they had waited another month that the aneurysm would have burst and I would have bled to death like John Ritter did. So if I had listened to Harvey Sacks, I doubt I would be alive today.

 

If they do merge, I hope it doesn't decrease the quality of care from Emory, but helps "Deathstar".

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I have no use for Dr. Harvey Sacks. He did an echo on me, found an aortic arch aneurysm and said he wanted to watch it for a year. If he did anything, he would "just wrap it". My wife didn't agree and talked with the doctor she worked for. He got me an appointment with his cardiologist at Emory.

 

I ended up going to Emory and got the best cardiologist and the best surgeon, and they did emergency surgery to replace the arch with a graft. I asked if they could just wrap it like Dr Sacks said. The Emory surgeon told me that they haven't 'wrapped' an aneurysm in many years - that was a very old method of treatment. The doctor told me after the procedure that if they had waited another month that the aneurysm would have burst and I would have bled to death like John Ritter did. So if I had listened to Harvey Sacks, I doubt I would be alive today.

 

If they do merge, I hope it doesn't decrease the quality of care from Emory, but helps "Deathstar".

 

Dr. Sacks told me to tell you his attorney will be in touch with you first thing in the morning.

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I don't like Dr. Sacks. He was my mother's heart doctor in the beginning and he just always seem preoccupied with something else.

 

She had an enlarged abdominal aorta and we had to keep an eye on it. He was useless.

 

I found her another cardiologist and was pleased with him. I wish I had told Dr. Sacks he just needed to quit his practice and go write a book or whatever.

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Back when this all started I explained to people how a system worked.

It is a wonderful thing that takes out the middleman (insurance company) and uses the money to pay for

all the personnel and equipment.

It is a mind boggling amount of money going straight to medicine.

As the system grows so do the access to more doctors and facility.

In our community you will be hard pressed to find a doctor not in the system.

For those practicing the art of medicine, truly wanting to help sick people this is going to be the best

thing that ever happened to them with guaranteed payment and less than 1/2 administration which most doctors hate.

They will make their money on volume of patients and the most successful will be that way from referrals.

Many thought they would not be able to see who they wanted, that may be true with come insurances as long as people hold on to them.

 

My biggest hope is that it will be made available to local and state employees. They have some of the most expensive insurance and often have extremely high deductibles and co-pays to make it affordable.

 

Of course we know that it is all about who lobbies the strongest as to what they get. They certainly deserve better. For many these insurance companies are at almost 75% profit off of them.

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I found this comment laughable.

"The real attraction was the tremendous track record, patient satisfaction and effectiveness of the WellStar organization."

 

 

Srsly. Geez.

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Back when this all started I explained to people how a system worked.

It is a wonderful thing that takes out the middleman (insurance company) and uses the money to pay for

all the personnel and equipment.

It is a mind boggling amount of money going straight to medicine.

As the system grows so do the access to more doctors and facility.

In our community you will be hard pressed to find a doctor not in the system.

For those practicing the art of medicine, truly wanting to help sick people this is going to be the best

thing that ever happened to them with guaranteed payment and less than 1/2 administration which most doctors hate.

They will make their money on volume of patients and the most successful will be that way from referrals.

Many thought they would not be able to see who they wanted, that may be true with come insurances as long as people hold on to them.

 

My biggest hope is that it will be made available to local and state employees. They have some of the most expensive insurance and often have extremely high deductibles and co-pays to make it affordable.

 

Of course we know that it is all about who lobbies the strongest as to what they get. They certainly deserve better. For many these insurance companies are at almost 75% profit off of them.

 

"...according to data from Yahoo business, the health insurance industry, with

an average profit margin of 3.3 percent, is the 86th most profitable industry."

 

http://mjperry.blogspot.com/2009/08/health-insurance-industry-ranks-86-by.html

 

 

8)

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Emory Midtown did an absolute excellant job on my hip, but discharged and sent me home a very, very sick patient with obvious post surgical medical challenges.

 

Wellstar saved my life the following day after I got home.

 

I see this being a good deal, and yes, for joint replacements, which are not being done at Wellstar Paulding now by anyone tied in as part of the WellStar group, would probably be done at Emory's Tucker facility that ONLY does joint and spinal cases. As specialized as they come, and with the leading successful track record in the Eastern USA. None of our other Metro Atlanta Hospitals can touch Emory on joint replacement success, except Grady.

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I found this comment laughable.

"The real attraction was the tremendous track record, patient satisfaction and effectiveness of the WellStar organization."

LOL they must have not read my survey yet

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I don't know about the merger, but I've been in the Wellstar system since 1998 and I've always been pleased with my doctors. If I come across one I don't like, then I find another, like I did with my hip doctor but he's with Resurgeons using Wellstar facilities.

 

My surgeries were at Kennestone and I was pleased. Now in all fairness, 20 years ago I would have said not only no, but hell no. But I think they have made a lot of improvements in the last 20 years.

 

When my husband had kidney cancer in 1994 his first Oncologist was in Marietta/Kennestone. I soon found another Oncologist and facility. I chose Piedmont and I'm thankful I did.

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Not sure if this is related to this story, but it doesn't look good.

 

Local hospitals buy medical practices; patients forced to pay

http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/local-hospitals-buy-medical-practices-patients-for/nj9My/

I saw that. I am not surprised that they have to charge those with other insurance more. In fact they have always done it.

Your doctor or hospital usually had to be in network work to even get paid. They signed a contract saying that they would accept lower payment or percentage. They all raised their fees to make sure they could get paid what they needed to. For the unfortunate patients it raised their percentage also.

A lot of people don't understand the game.

 

"...according to data from Yahoo business, the health insurance industry, with

an average profit margin of 3.3 percent, is the 86th most profitable industry."

 

http://mjperry.blogspot.com/2009/08/health-insurance-industry-ranks-86-by.html

 

 

8)

You think I care? 0% is what I want them to make. They are not much better than the mafia. They don't care how you pay it and if you don't they need you to die.

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I saw that. I am not surprised that they have to charge those with other insurance more. In fact they have always done it.

Your doctor or hospital usually had to be in network work to even get paid. They signed a contract saying that they would accept lower payment or percentage. They all raised their fees to make sure they could get paid what they needed to. For the unfortunate patients it raised their percentage also.

A lot of people don't understand the game.

You think I care? 0% is what I want them to make. They are not much better than the mafia. They don't care how you pay it and if you don't they need you to die.

I don't know about the dieing part LPPT, but I will say this, it is a game. Very, very clearly a game. You have an issue that scares you and you end up in the ER......you are in the game. Firmly in the game.

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You think I care? 0% is what I want them to make. They are not much better than the mafia. They don't care how you pay it and if you don't they need you to die.

 

 

You should care about misinformation.

 

 

8)

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The last time I was in Wellstar Paulding I was taken by ambulance across the parking lot (yes, I could have walked or been taken in a wheelchair) to the ER where they kept an eye on me for a couple of hours. When they decided that they didn't know what to do, they took me to Emory. At Emory they continued to monitor me, out of courtesy, but discharged me knowing that my ailment was normal for the heart condition I have. Of course, my insurance company refused to pay for the ambulance ride across the parking lot - that costs close to $1000.

 

Down here where we live now, we have two major hospitals that aren't affiliated with each other. Competition has been good for the quality of care and for the patients.

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