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Ebola threat in Paulding

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You guys are forgetting one very important thing.

 

There is an "experimental" treatment/vaccine that the FDA can (and will) fast track.

 

And lots, and lots, and lots of people get rich.

 

And it is always about the money

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The only thing we need to seal our border for is to keep the 1% from banking their money off shore, while living with us.

 

As for as Eboli, there is only one case, so far. But, the cases of off shore banking, of the U.S. dollar, there are billions.

 

Your wealth envy has driven you over the edge. In your next life do a better job of building your own wealth so you aren't so envious of others. You might want to go ahead and put in your order for a larger "you know what" since the size of that usually dictates (no pun intended) your envy for other things. 8)

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Your wealth envy has driven you over the edge. In your next life do a better job of building your own wealth so you aren't so envious of others. You might want to go ahead and put in your order for a larger "you know what" since the size of that usually dictates (no pun intended) your envy for other things. 8)

 

 

Sense money is the root of all evil, feelip, I'll be satisfied with a bigger root. I have to root to hard, now, and will probably die poor.

 

Jokes aside, feelip, I don't envy people with money. They are in fear all the time that someone may want some of their money. And they usually find someone who wants more of it than they are willing to give up, which is bad on their nerves.

 

Alter all, the nerves in their eyeballs somehow got tangled up with the nerves in their anus, and they have a chitty outlook on life.

 

 

They've got a root in their brain that came out of their arse, and crawled up their spinal cord.

 

 

amygdala-hippocampus.jpg

 

 

I just looked back in here, and cracked myself up, feelip. That is a funny situation you guys involve yourselves with.

 

I'm juts wondering, do you'll have to take a lot of Prozac, or something, to keep from having a nervous breakdown? :rofl:

Edited by The Postman

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You guys are forgetting one very important thing.

 

There is an "experimental" treatment/vaccine that the FDA can (and will) fast track.

 

And lots, and lots, and lots of people get rich.

 

Wonder if Obama has any stock?

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It is also very possible, and likely, that someone who crossed paths with and got exposed somewhere other than a source country, gets on their flight home, and ends up sick, infecting people on the plane and at the airport.

 

Again, the ONLY way to contain epidemics like this one is turning into is by erradicating the source of the infections, and I believe that is the first thing the administration, CDC, and WHO did, sending the personnell and supplies/equipment to fight the disease at the source.

 

As far as non cooperative, is it that or just dumb stupidity ?

 

We have a nurse in Texas whose knowledge of geography was so poor she did not realize the link between the symptons the guy was showing and the Ebola warnings all over the media.

 

And we have 3rd world illieterate uneducated people who have no finite grasp for what a virus even is, let alone how lethal this one can be. As a result, they feel fine, and want to go to the store, and slip out to do so.

 

I would suggest in those cases anyone possibly exposed should be detained at a fully quarantine facility.

 

We know by treating highly contagious animal diseases, where the animal CANNOT simply travel from A to B, that in order to get the spread of the disease we have to erradicate at the sources. If a flock of chickens test positive for an high path avian influenza, a crew shows up in a matter of hours in their space suit garb, and using a viricide foam shot out of a bazooka like tube, foam the houses with the chickens up to about 3 feet. This suffocates and kills all the chickens while killing all of the viral elements as well.

 

They are then buried inside the chicken house to be composted, and the house is under a 6 month quarantine.

 

Sending properly trained medical personnell with all the equipment and supplies they need to cure the patients at ground zero is the only way to stop the spread and prevent a travel related epidemic.

 

And those people should have never been let into this country.

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Wonder if Obama has any stock?

I don't know if they still are today, but the Koch Brothers were heavy, heavy investors with Pfizer, Maersk, Bayer, and many of the other Big Pharma. They are almost all based in the EEC now, but they are all world wide players.

 

Assuming they can get a vaccine that is effective, the volume produced in the next 3 months would not vaccinate the population at the source, let alone Europe and the USA. We have "X" amount of vaccine eggs available to grow the vaccines in. To ramp up production takes a minimum of 6 months, assuming we had the parent stock eggs available today to set in the hatcheries to produce the birds to lay the eggs in 6 months. We have improved the grow out time for meat chickens from 12 weeks to 5-6 weeks for a 6-8 pound bird. But it still takes 21 days to incubate them and 24-25 weeks before they start to lay eggs.

 

There is much R&D going on using tissue instead of eggs, but to date the resulting vaccines have had poor efficacy against the virus they are innoculating for. So fertile chicken eggs are still the way to go. Because all the equipment is automated, the eggs have to be a certain size. To Big and they get broken or cracked,.....too small, and the needle won't inject at the right point, and or the harvesting equipment won't remove the top of the egg properly.

 

I would not count on an effective vaccine available to the general public for at least 6 months or longer.

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If people feel that there is a life threatening problem, one that could easily affect them and/or their loved ones, they naturally want something done to stop whatever that threat is.

Here is the US, we expect our government to take the steps necessary to protect it's citizens.

But, if the government fails to take those steps, the people themselves will start to take those steps themselves.

So it is incumbent on the government to make sure that the people of the United States know (or at lest believe) that every thing is being done to protect the people of this country from a life taking threat.

 

Is the government doing that?

Maybe, maybe not.

I know that ebola is a major major problem, one that could have a drastic impact on the people of the US, not to mention the rest of the world.

How do I, a little ole country boy from Paudling County GA know that?

The President of the United States took the time to make a special speech to the country and the President of the United States said that ebola is a major problem.

Why do I not know for sure that the government is doing all that can be done to protect it's citizens from this major threat>

Because in the same speech where the president told me that ebola was a major threat, he also said that by taking the steps the government was taking, it would keep the ebola away from the citizen of this country, yet now we see that is not true and many, including people here on pcom, are saying there is no way to keep it out.

 

Things like that do not inspire confidence that our government is taking all the steps necessary to protect it's citizens.

One last thing, I do not believe that Obama is intentionally allowing the ebola to come to the United States, anymore than I believe that Ronald Reagan allowed aids to flourish to kill gays or that crack is allowed to continue to kill blacks.

I could be wrong about all three things, perhaps they are all out to get us, but I don't think so.

 

The government has to take the steps to insure that the people feel as safe as they can.

And a large part of that is clear and accurate communication about what the threat is and what is being done.

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A couple of things:

 

First, the nature of ebola is that when you get sick, you get really sick really fast.   A couple of ibuprofen may get you on the plane but given its anticoagulant status, it would probably kill you to boot as it would spur and exaggerate the hemorrhagic issues of ebola.  I wouldn't recommend it or aspirin... maybe some tylenol.  Second, the fever is not the issue (except it marks your probably becoming contagious but there are degrees of how contagious you are.  So when you are throwing up blood and oozing it out of your eyes, that stuff is toxic. 

 

But when they say it is not as 'contagious' as other viruses, it is based on the statistics which establish that even people living in households with a person who dies of ebola in that household - only one of seven contract the disease.  Probably because they cleaned up the body or the area where the person died barehanded and picked their nose.   It is not spread casually.   Even if someone coughs (something they really don't do that much or with much force) the viral bits do not 'float in the air' and you'd have to get a 'real spit  drop in your eye' to catch the disease.  It happens.

 

I mean it has been 'flourishing' as a disease in these pockets of west Africa for six months and 7,000 people have contracted the disease, most (except health care workers who are by definition at higher risk) of the transmissions being because people were distrustful of western medicine, were poor and living in squalor that magnifies the risk.  I mean, how do you sanitize a dirt floor a victim pukes on, especially if you have no sanitizing agents (chlorine for instance.) I don't think you have any idea how favorable tightly packed slums with limited sources of drinking water, open sewers and dense living conditions are ... and only 7000 people have caught it?   I mean if this were an easily transmitted disease, you'd expect 50,000-100,000 folks to have come down with it in the first three months in a place like this; not 7,000 in six months because these cities are among the 'best' places for a contagion to spread on the face of the earth.

 

Typhoid and cholera epidemics are clearly much more dangerous there and are indicative of how other contagions in the region proceed. For instance typhoid is food and water-borne and in 2011 infected over 20 million folks in central Africa.

 

 

Since early November 2011, there has been a surge of typhoid fever outbreaks in central and southern Africa, affecting children and adults alike. Unfortunately, it takes a series of outbreaks such as these in Zambia, Zimbabwe, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), to draw attention to this often-overlooked disease in a region plagued by many needs and few resources.

 

Typhoid outbreaks usually occur when common water and food sources become contaminated with infected human waste. Symptoms include high fever, flu-like symptoms, abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhea, and even death. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) approximately 21.6 million cases of typhoid occur each year, resulting in at least 200,000 deaths, mostly among school- and preschool-aged children.

 

If found last night's Daily Show opening bit particularly illuminating in terms of those who are DEMANDING actions to restrict freedom based on their overblown conception of the level of risk.

 

 

Which leads me back to the notion that hyping fear, a favorite electoral strategy of the right, is at the root of this 'sky is falling, we're all gonna die' stuff.

 

BTW, my wife is a nurse at the Cobb jail and I'm not at all concerned regarding the so-called reports - Hospitals, prior to the discovery of the man in Texas, had tested something like 100 other 'suspected' cases of ebola and that guy was the first and only positive.  Even among those with whom he has had contact, the chance of infection is small ... unless of course the folks were handling the sheets and licking their fingers.  While it is possible that this guy in the Cobb Jail is positive, it is highly unlikely.  Still, given the fatality rate, which will probably drop to 10-20  percent of those who come down with it here in the short term because of early and aggressive care, it may make a few folks sick.  That may drop even further once the vaccines come on line.   Oh, and surepip, the process for creating these vaccines don't use chicken eggs; rather they use cultured hamster ovaries  in big vats :)

 

pubby

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I don't know if they still are today, but the Koch Brothers were heavy, heavy investors with Pfizer, Maersk, Bayer, and many of the other Big Pharma. They are almost all based in the EEC now, but they are all world wide players.

 

Assuming they can get a vaccine that is effective, the volume produced in the next 3 months would not vaccinate the population at the source, let alone Europe and the USA. We have "X" amount of vaccine eggs available to grow the vaccines in. To ramp up production takes a minimum of 6 months, assuming we had the parent stock eggs available today to set in the hatcheries to produce the birds to lay the eggs in 6 months. We have improved the grow out time for meat chickens from 12 weeks to 5-6 weeks for a 6-8 pound bird. But it still takes 21 days to incubate them and 24-25 weeks before they start to lay eggs.

 

There is much R&D going on using tissue instead of eggs, but to date the resulting vaccines have had poor efficacy against the virus they are innoculating for. So fertile chicken eggs are still the way to go. Because all the equipment is automated, the eggs have to be a certain size. To Big and they get broken or cracked,.....too small, and the needle won't inject at the right point, and or the harvesting equipment won't remove the top of the egg properly.

 

I would not count on an effective vaccine available to the general public for at least 6 months or longer.

They are not in lock step with Obama and he holds the key to shutting this down in America,

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A couple of things:

 

First, the nature of ebola is that when you get sick, you get really sick really fast. A couple of ibuprofen may get you on the plane but given its anticoagulant status, it would probably kill you to boot as it would spur and exaggerate the hemorrhagic issues of ebola. I wouldn't recommend it or aspirin... maybe some tylenol. Second, the fever is not the issue (except it marks your probably becoming contagious but there are degrees of how contagious you are. So when you are throwing up blood and oozing it out of your eyes, that stuff is toxic.

 

But when they say it is not as 'contagious' as other viruses, it is based on the statistics which establish that even people living in households with a person who dies of ebola in that household - only one of seven contract the disease. Probably because they cleaned up the body or the area where the person died barehanded and picked their nose. It is not spread casually. Even if someone coughs (something they really don't do that much or with much force) the viral bits do not 'float in the air' and you'd have to get a 'real spit drop in your eye' to catch the disease. It happens.

 

I mean it has been 'flourishing' as a disease in these pockets of west Africa for six months and 7,000 people have contracted the disease, most (except health care workers who are by definition at higher risk) of the transmissions being because people were distrustful of western medicine, were poor and living in squalor that magnifies the risk. I mean, how do you sanitize a dirt floor a victim pukes on, especially if you have no sanitizing agents (chlorine for instance.) I don't think you have any idea how favorable tightly packed slums with limited sources of drinking water, open sewers and dense living conditions are ... and only 7000 people have caught it? I mean if this were an easily transmitted disease, you'd expect 50,000-100,000 folks to have come down with it in the first three months in a place like this; not 7,000 in six months because these cities are among the 'best' places for a contagion to spread on the face of the earth.

 

Typhoid and cholera epidemics are clearly much more dangerous there and are indicative of how other contagions in the region proceed. For instance typhoid is food and water-borne and in 2011 infected over 20 million folks in central Africa.

 

 

If found last night's Daily Show opening bit particularly illuminating in terms of those who are DEMANDING actions to restrict freedom based on their overblown conception of the level of risk.

 

 

Which leads me back to the notion that hyping fear, a favorite electoral strategy of the right, is at the root of this 'sky is falling, we're all gonna die' stuff.

 

BTW, my wife is a nurse at the Cobb jail and I'm not at all concerned regarding the so-called reports - Hospitals, prior to the discovery of the man in Texas, had tested something like 100 other 'suspected' cases of ebola and that guy was the first and only positive. Even among those with whom he has had contact, the chance of infection is small ... unless of course the folks were handling the sheets and licking their fingers. While it is possible that this guy in the Cobb Jail is positive, it is highly unlikely. Still, given the fatality rate, which will probably drop to 10-20 percent of those who come down with it here in the short term because of early and aggressive care, it may make a few folks sick. That may drop even further once the vaccines come on line. Oh, and surepip, the process for creating these vaccines don't use chicken eggs; rather they use cultured hamster ovaries in big vats :)

 

pubby

Glad you are not concerned Pubby. Good to know. BTW you are wrong about how fast it can hit. The man who brought it to Texas knew he had it when he got on the plane and he passed their so called screening.

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Wouldn't it be cool if crime dropped because folks would be afraid of getting Ebola in jail. That would be a for sure death sentance.

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A couple of things:

 

First, the nature of ebola is that when you get sick, you get really sick really fast. A couple of ibuprofen may get you on the plane but given its anticoagulant status, it would probably kill you to boot as it would spur and exaggerate the hemorrhagic issues of ebola. I wouldn't recommend it or aspirin... maybe some tylenol. Second, the fever is not the issue (except it marks your probably becoming contagious but there are degrees of how contagious you are. So when you are throwing up blood and oozing it out of your eyes, that stuff is toxic.

 

But when they say it is not as 'contagious' as other viruses, it is based on the statistics which establish that even people living in households with a person who dies of ebola in that household - only one of seven contract the disease. Probably because they cleaned up the body or the area where the person died barehanded and picked their nose. It is not spread casually. Even if someone coughs (something they really don't do that much or with much force) the viral bits do not 'float in the air' and you'd have to get a 'real spit drop in your eye' to catch the disease. It happens.

 

I mean it has been 'flourishing' as a disease in these pockets of west Africa for six months and 7,000 people have contracted the disease, most (except health care workers who are by definition at higher risk) of the transmissions being because people were distrustful of western medicine, were poor and living in squalor that magnifies the risk. I mean, how do you sanitize a dirt floor a victim pukes on, especially if you have no sanitizing agents (chlorine for instance.) I don't think you have any idea how favorable tightly packed slums with limited sources of drinking water, open sewers and dense living conditions are ... and only 7000 people have caught it? I mean if this were an easily transmitted disease, you'd expect 50,000-100,000 folks to have come down with it in the first three months in a place like this; not 7,000 in six months because these cities are among the 'best' places for a contagion to spread on the face of the earth.

 

Typhoid and cholera epidemics are clearly much more dangerous there and are indicative of how other contagions in the region proceed. For instance typhoid is food and water-borne and in 2011 infected over 20 million folks in central Africa.

 

 

If found last night's Daily Show opening bit particularly illuminating in terms of those who are DEMANDING actions to restrict freedom based on their overblown conception of the level of risk.

 

 

Which leads me back to the notion that hyping fear, a favorite electoral strategy of the right, is at the root of this 'sky is falling, we're all gonna die' stuff.

 

BTW, my wife is a nurse at the Cobb jail and I'm not at all concerned regarding the so-called reports - Hospitals, prior to the discovery of the man in Texas, had tested something like 100 other 'suspected' cases of ebola and that guy was the first and only positive. Even among those with whom he has had contact, the chance of infection is small ... unless of course the folks were handling the sheets and licking their fingers. While it is possible that this guy in the Cobb Jail is positive, it is highly unlikely. Still, given the fatality rate, which will probably drop to 10-20 percent of those who come down with it here in the short term because of early and aggressive care, it may make a few folks sick. That may drop even further once the vaccines come on line. Oh, and surepip, the process for creating these vaccines don't use chicken eggs; rather they use cultured hamster ovaries in big vats :)

 

pubb

 

Which explains why they were flying patients in a negative pressure tank. :fool:

 

I'm betting that was just for media hype. I bet during the flight the pilot invited the patient into the cockpit to show him how an airplane works.

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Glad you are not concerned Pubby. Good to know. BTW you are wrong about how fast it can hit. The man who brought it to Texas knew he had it when he got on the plane and he passed their so called screening.

No he didn't know. He may have suspected but if he knew it, then he was EXCEEDINGLY STUPID because anyone familiar knows that the earlier the palliative treatment begins, the higher likelihood the outcome is positive - you live.

 

At worst, he was probably in denial that he had it and was more than happy to take the Texas doctor's reading that he had something that could be treated with an antibiotic.

 

pubby

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No he didn't know. He may have suspected but if he knew it, then he was EXCEEDINGLY STUPID because anyone familiar knows that the earlier the palliative treatment begins, the higher likelihood the outcome is positive - you live.

 

At worst, he was probably in denial that he had it and was more than happy to take the Texas doctor's reading that he had something that could be treated with an antibiotic.

 

pubby

 

He was exceedingly self-centered and didn't care how many he infected as long as he got to the U.S. for treatment.

 

Our Government is exceedingly stupid for not forcing the West African countries to stop all travel to and from the countries. We send them billions of dollars every year. Use that fat check as a tool of leverage. No stoppie, no money.

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No he didn't know. He may have suspected but if he knew it, then he was EXCEEDINGLY STUPID because anyone familiar knows that the earlier the palliative treatment begins, the higher likelihood the outcome is positive - you live.

 

At worst, he was probably in denial that he had it and was more than happy to take the Texas doctor's reading that he had something that could be treated with an antibiotic.

 

pubby

 

At best, the man is a complete and utter moron, I mean one of those people who are sooooo stupid that even the people who religiously watch the Kardashians and the Jersey Shore, said, "That man be dum."

 

At worst, and in my opinion the truth of the matter, he knew he had been exposed, figured he had it, and came to the US in order to get treatment if the did have it, which he was pretty sure he did. Regardless (or irregardless, just to irritate a few) of who or how many people he infected and/or killed.

 

Either way, the human race is better off with him not sucking up any more oxygen than he already has.

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Not if they have 2 passports. We do not make new citizens turn in their birth country passports.

 

It's been my experience that the European colonizing country allow citizens from their former colony to obtain passports and citizenship from the mother country. I know for certain France and Spain do this.

 

Brasil Allows its citizens 3 generations to obtain passports from the country their grandparents immigrated from. So if your granny came to Brasil from Italy, you would be entitled to your Brazilian passport AND an Italian passport.

 

Add to this duplicity the fact many African immigrants Americanize their names. I worked with an Iranian whose passport had Beharuce, which he changed to Bruce for USA citizenship.

 

They fly from Africa to any EEC country on their Liberian passport. Spend a few days in Barcelona and fly here on their Spanish passport.

 

Who is going to know they had been in Liberia? And how?

 

The only sure way to contain and mitigate the spread of this killer virus is to eradicate the source.

 

 

 

Airline passenger manifest database.

 

 

8)

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Nope. There are many other ways for one to depart Liberia to a other country - train, car, private plane.... And then hop a plane to Paris, Rome, where ever and then fly to here. If they have available money, and 2 passports there is no way to track where they've been.

 

Stop it at the source or pay the consequences.

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No he didn't know. He may have suspected but if he knew it, then he was EXCEEDINGLY STUPID because anyone familiar knows that the earlier the palliative treatment begins, the higher likelihood the outcome is positive - you live.

 

At worst, he was probably in denial that he had it and was more than happy to take the Texas doctor's reading that he had something that could be treated with an antibiotic.

 

pubby

His former boss in Africa says he told him he had it and why he was taking the trip.

 

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/10/03/Boss-Coworkers-of-US-Ebola-Patient-He-Knew-He-Had-Ebola-US-Trip-Was-Desperate-Attempt-to-Survive

 

Another unnamed source, described as a FedEx worker in Monrovia, told the Observer that Duncan knew he had Ebola, as well. "A source at FedEx in Monrovia said Mr. Duncan apparently knew he was suffering from the disease and that his best chance of survival was reaching to the United States," writes author Omari Jackson, "a position that a family source denied, when we sought confirmation." The Observer notes that the departure to America, for the source and others consulted, appeared a "desperate attempt to survive."

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It's crap like this that turn people off to this site

Maybe you didn't care for the phrasing he used but the fact remains, either the nurse didn't communicate that vital information to the other medical personnel treating him, or they didn't pay close enough attention. Bottom line, they dropped the ball.

 

The only 'turn off' I've found on this site is the sour grapes attitude along the lines of what you've expressed right there^^^

It's childish and whiny.

 

Why adults can't pass by the comments they don't care for without constantly bitching about every little thing is something I just don't understand at all.

 

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Maybe you didn't care for the phrasing he used but the fact remains, either the nurse didn't communicate that vital information to the other medical personnel treating him, or they didn't pay close enough attention. Bottom line, they dropped the ball.

 

The only 'turn off' I've found on this site is the sour grapes attitude along the lines of what you've expressed right there^^^

It's childish and whiny.

 

Why adults can't pass by the comments they don't care for without constantly bitching about every little thing is something I just don't understand at all.

 

You only have his word that he told them. Given his lies to get here it is in question.

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Maybe you didn't care for the phrasing he used but the fact remains, either the nurse didn't communicate that vital information to the other medical personnel treating him, or they didn't pay close enough attention. Bottom line, they dropped the ball.

 

The only 'turn off' I've found on this site is the sour grapes attitude along the lines of what you've expressed right there^^^

It's childish and whiny.

 

Why adults can't pass by the comments they don't care for without constantly bitching about every little thing is something I just don't understand at all.

 

The nurse most likely doesn't read or see the news much. She's probably one of those "low information voters" who usually votes for those with the (D) after the names.

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If he k=new he was infected, why did he wait to go to the hospital ?

 

He knew he had been exposed, but did he really know he had the disease ?

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His former boss in Africa says he told him he had it and why he was taking the trip.

 

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/10/03/Boss-Coworkers-of-US-Ebola-Patient-He-Knew-He-Had-Ebola-US-Trip-Was-Desperate-Attempt-to-Survive

 

Another unnamed source, described as a FedEx worker in Monrovia, told the Observer that Duncan knew he had Ebola, as well. "A source at FedEx in Monrovia said Mr. Duncan apparently knew he was suffering from the disease and that his best chance of survival was reaching to the United States," writes author Omari Jackson, "a position that a family source denied, when we sought confirmation." The Observer notes that the departure to America, for the source and others consulted, appeared a "desperate attempt to survive."

I just love when information is received from "an unnamed source." That, combined with the reporting website makes me believe NOT ONE WORD.

 

If he did it, he did it. The thing to do now is contain it.

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The nurse most likely doesn't read or see the news much. She's probably one of those "low information voters" who usually votes for those with the (D) after the names.

Maybe, but then again, she might be one of those nut bag republicans.

 

 

 

 

Sorry, wasn't going to pass up the chance. :)

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I just love when information is received from "an unnamed source." That, combined with the reporting website makes me believe NOT ONE WORD.

 

If he did it, he did it. The thing to do now is contain it.

They took the report from a news source in Liberia. You would do well to follow some of these sources they have real news and are usually ahead of those you seem to follow.

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Maybe you didn't care for the phrasing he used but the fact remains, either the nurse didn't communicate that vital information to the other medical personnel treating him, or they didn't pay close enough attention. Bottom line, they dropped the ball.

 

The only 'turn off' I've found on this site is the sour grapes attitude along the lines of what you've expressed right there^^^

It's childish and whiny.

 

Why adults can't pass by the comments they don't care for without constantly bitching about every little thing is something I just don't understand at all.

 

It turns out the miscommunication was probably caused by a flaw in how they used the medical records software:

 

Ebola and the electronic health record gap

 

 

"He said that he had been in Africa," the hospital said in a statement. "The nurse entered that information in the nursing portion of the electronic medical record."

 

But it turns out that that answer-which could have alerted doctors of the possibility that Duncan had Ebola-was not relayed electronically to them because of "a flaw" in the way doctors' workflow portions of the electronic health records interacts with the nursing portions of the EHR.

 

"In our electronic health records, there are separate physician and nursing workflows," the hospital said. "The documentation of the travel history was located in the nursing workflow portion of the EHR, and was designed to provide a high reliability nursing process to allow for the administration of influenza vaccine under a physician-delegated standing order. As designed, the travel history would not automatically appear in the physician's standard workflow."

 

Edited by markdavd

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His former boss in Africa says he told him he had it and why he was taking the trip.

 

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/10/03/Boss-Coworkers-of-US-Ebola-Patient-He-Knew-He-Had-Ebola-US-Trip-Was-Desperate-Attempt-to-Survive

 

Another unnamed source, described as a FedEx worker in Monrovia, told the Observer that Duncan knew he had Ebola, as well. "A source at FedEx in Monrovia said Mr. Duncan apparently knew he was suffering from the disease and that his best chance of survival was reaching to the United States," writes author Omari Jackson, "a position that a family source denied, when we sought confirmation." The Observer notes that the departure to America, for the source and others consulted, appeared a "desperate attempt to survive."

 

Brietbart? get serious.

 

First, this trip was planned and booked with visas etc. on Sept. 2 .. He didn't have it on Sept. 2nd or he'd still be in Monrovia and probably dead.

 

I'm pretty sure with his future ahead, he didn't go out and get it just 'for the experience' ... drugs are cheaper and provide a lot better experience with much lower risk ... even if the delirium is a good one as you slip near death.

 

pubby

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They took the report from a news source in Liberia. You would do well to follow some of these sources they have real news and are usually ahead of those you seem to follow.

By the man's own admission be carried someone in his arms he knew to have Ebola a few days before traveling to the US. I think he knew he was going to be infected or stood a very good chance of being infected. He lied to the screener at the airport about having contact with someone who had Ebola and that's why Liberian officials now want to prosecute him.

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Brietbart? get serious.

 

First, this trip was planned and booked with visas etc. on Sept. 2 .. He didn't have it on Sept. 2nd or he'd still be in Monrovia and probably dead.

 

I'm pretty sure with his future ahead, he didn't go out and get it just 'for the experience' ... drugs are cheaper and provide a lot better experience with much lower risk ... even if the delirium is a good one as you slip near death.

 

pubby

What does that have to do with the fact that he came anyway and probably knew he had it and lied about it. He should not have come. The end!

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It turns out the miscommunication was probably caused by a flaw in how they used the medical records software:

 

Ebola and the electronic health record gap

 

 

What they also didn't say, probably, is that doctors sometime are arrogant bastards who don't listen to nurses ... or patients.

 

However, as noted in the Cobb Jail experience, the charge nurse is what brought the doctors to bear on the inmate who was sickly and had recently traveled to Africa. Of course that turned out to be a false alarm like most are.

 

pubby

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By the man's own admission be carried someone in his arms he knew to have Ebola a few days before traveling to the US. I think he knew he was going to be infected or stood a very good chance of being infected. He lied to the screener at the airport about having contact with someone who had Ebola and that's why Liberian officials now want to prosecute him.

 

I read that the word is spreading to those who can afford plane tickets in Africa - If you think you're coming down with ebola, take a bunch of advil to control any fever and lie your way onto the plane.

 

Once you're in the USA, you can rely on the government to give you the best medical care available.

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By the man's own admission be carried someone in his arms he knew to have Ebola a few days before traveling to the US. I think he knew he was going to be infected or stood a very good chance of being infected. He lied to the screener at the airport about having contact with someone who had Ebola and that's why Liberian officials now want to prosecute him.

 

Yes, and another bit of proof you are among those who insist that no good deed go unpunished.

 

It is sad but the guy took a risk to help some one which is a compassionate act. One might even think that God directed him to lie on the form because in so doing, he was able to make it to America where his chance of surviving is probably quite good comparatively. Indeed, if he survives ... one might suggest that God was more forgiving than the Liberian officials.

 

pubby

 

I read that the word is spreading to those who can afford plane tickets in Africa - If you think you're coming down with ebola, take a bunch of advil to control any fever and lie your way onto the plane.

 

Once you're in the USA, you can rely on the government to give you the best medical care available.

 

You still have to have a visa in hand to travel from there to here. It is not like taking a plane to Vegas.

 

pubby

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Yes, and another bit of proof you are among those who insist that no good deed go unpunished.

 

It is sad but the guy took a risk to help some one which is a compassionate act. One might even think that God directed him to lie on the form because in so doing, he was able to make it to America where his chance of surviving is probably quite good comparatively. Indeed, if he survives ... one might suggest that God was more forgiving than the Liberian officials.

 

pubby

 

You still have to have a visa in hand to travel from there to here. It is not like taking a plane to Vegas.

 

pubby

I wonder what the immigration status is of the woman he came here to see. Travel needs to be stopped from and to that country and it becomes more apparent every day.

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I read that the word is spreading to those who can afford plane tickets in Africa - If you think you're coming down with ebola, take a bunch of advil to control any fever and lie your way onto the plane.

 

Once you're in the USA, you can rely on the government to give you the best medical care available.

Just like all the UAC who came flooding across the Texas border when Obama gave Amnesty to the dreamers. The word went out that they could come and stay. Guess what they did and they can. Whose fault is that? The same one who will bear the blame if sick folks flood America from Africa to get treatment. It worked for this man didn't it?

 

Yes, and another bit of proof you are among those who insist that no good deed go unpunished.

 

It is sad but the guy took a risk to help some one which is a compassionate act. One might even think that God directed him to lie on the form because in so doing, he was able to make it to America where his chance of surviving is probably quite good comparatively. Indeed, if he survives ... one might suggest that God was more forgiving than the Liberian officials.

 

pubby

 

You still have to have a visa in hand to travel from there to here. It is not like taking a plane to Vegas.

 

pubby

He doesn't get points for being stupid....

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The nurse most likely doesn't read or see the news much. She's probably one of those "low information voters" who usually votes for those with the (D) after the names.

Maybe, but then again, she might be one of those nut bag republicans.

 

 

 

 

Sorry, wasn't going to pass up the chance. :)

 

Chances are, she or he, is a nonvoter. (just based on statistics)

But I do like the fact that we have low information voters who vote for the D and nut bags who vote for the R.

 

You both get a 100 likes for those.

They are not as good as "giant gelatinous ass", but then that is a hard one to beat.

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Yes, and another bit of proof you are among those who insist that no good deed go unpunished.

 

It is sad but the guy took a risk to help some one which is a compassionate act. One might even think that God directed him to lie on the form because in so doing, he was able to make it to America where his chance of surviving is probably quite good comparatively. Indeed, if he survives ... one might suggest that God was more forgiving than the Liberian officials.

 

pubby

 

You still have to have a visa in hand to travel from there to here. It is not like taking a plane to Vegas.

 

pubby

So because he did a good deed by carrying the Ebola stricken person in his arms, that excuses him for lying to the screeners so he could come to the US and possibly infect others?

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Yes, and another bit of proof you are among those who insist that no good deed go unpunished.

 

It is sad but the guy took a risk to help some one which is a compassionate act. One might even think that God directed him to lie on the form because in so doing, he was able to make it to America where his chance of surviving is probably quite good comparatively. Indeed, if he survives ... one might suggest that God was more forgiving than the Liberian officials.

 

pubby

 

You still have to have a visa in hand to travel from there to here. It is not like taking a plane to Vegas.

 

pubby

 

I spoke with God about this and he said he had nothing to do with it.

He also said to kill them all.

 

 

Or heal them all.....I really wasn't listening at that point.

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So because he did a good deed by carrying the Ebola stricken person in his arms, that excuses him for lying to the screeners so he could come to the US and possibly infect others?

 

I'm not so naive as to think people won't lie. Judgment is the Lords ... and it could be argued if the guy lives, he was merciful. I suspect the guy will gladly serve his 30 days in jail if he lives to return to Liberia.

 

pubby

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