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www.times-georgian.com/view/full_story/18296772/article-Water-plant-camera-captures-photo-of-bobcat?instance=TG_home_story

 

 

 

Water plant camera captures photo of bobcat

by Winston Jones/Times-Georgian 15 hrs ago | 3235 views | 1  | 31  |  | 

 

Workers at the Carrollton Water Treatment Plant set up a game camera and caught this bobcat on the property at 1:58 p.m. on April 13. Joe Kent, who works at the plant, said the bobcat appears to be about 14-15 inches tall but the camera makes it appear a little larger than it actually is.

Operators at the Carrollton Water Treatment Plant have reported several recent sightings of a bobcat. They even caught its image on camera.

 

“We’re on the river here and it seems to be passing through,” said Joe Kent, a plant employee. “We also saw it a couple of times last year.”

 

The water plant is on Highway 27 South near the Little Tallapoosa River Bridge.

 

Recently, the workers set up a game camera and caught the bobcat passing through the property at 1:58 p.m. on April 13. Kent said the bobcat appears to be about 14-15 inches tall but the camera makes it appear a little larger than it actually is. He said the cat went under the gates and through the property to get to the river bank on the other side.

 

“We believe it’s a female,” Kent said. “We think it may have a den somewhere up the river.”

 

Brent Womack, a wildlife biologist with the Game Management Section of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, said bobcats are common in Carroll County, although daylight sightings are somewhat rare.

 

“They shouldn’t be any sort of safety concern for people,” Womack said. “Bobcats usually run when they see you. They’re pretty elusive.”

 

He said bobcats tend to be more active at night, and the fact that this one was spotted in the daytime may mean she has kittens nearby and is having to hunt more often for food.

 

“You see them a lot around wetland areas, creek bottoms and young timber stands,” Womack said. “They like anywhere there’s a high rodent population, where they can hunt. They eat rodents, lizards, small birds and mammals, such as rabbits.”

 

Bud Jones, a Tallapoosa taxidermist, said bobcats have also been known to eat squirrels and even snakes.

 

“Every one we’ve mounted had been eating rabbits,” Jones said. “They normally stay in wooded areas, with lots of seclusion. I had a lady tell me that one came up on her porch, but normally, they’re fairly shy animals.”

 

Jones said deer hunters sometimes spot bobcats out during the day, although the cats are normally nocturnal.

 

“The ones that have been brought to me average about 15 pounds,” he said. “The largest I’ve seen from this area was 26 pounds, although they can weigh up to 40 pounds.”

 

Womack said he hunts a lot and has seen five bobcats over the years. He said bobcats are considered a fur-bearing animal and are regulated by the state.

 

“It’s illegal to kill them now,” he said. “It’s only legal to take them during the trapping season in fall and winter.”

 

Bobcats are trapped for their pelts.

 

According to the DNR fact sheet, the bobcat (Lynx rufus), is a native mammal in Georgia and found in all parts of the state. Bobcats are about twice the size of the common house cat and are generally colored yellowish brown with various streaks or spots of dark brown or black. The under parts are usually white with some black spots or bars on the inside of the legs. The tail is short and gives the appearance of being “bobbed.”

 

The males and females have the same color, but the males tend to be a little larger than the females. Males average 18 to 28 pounds, while females average from 14-20 pounds.

 

Bobcats sometimes reach the age of 12-13 years in the wild and captive ones can live more than 30 years, according to the DNR.

 

 

Read more: Times-Georgian - Water plant camera captures photo of bobcat

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My mother lives in the area of Bright Star and 20 in douglasville and they were scared by a Bobcat screaming in the woods a couple of nights ago. So they are on the prowl.

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We are on Davis Mill North and have seen a few in the last 2 years.

 

Beautiful animals.

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I was told several have been spotted in Marshall Fuller/Bob Hunton Road area.

 

 

I have heard one, I live off bob hunton, but haven't seen one yet. It sounded like it came front the big empty pasture on bh, between the willows and fate fuller. There is a pond and stream, plenty of food for those big kitties.

 

I saw one dead, hit by a car, on Barrett Pkwy between burnt hickory rd and stilesboro, last year. It was a small to medium sized kitty.

Edited by Ash

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