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jasonclancy0428

Dysgraphia

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I have a 3rd grader that I think may have this but not sure how to go about getting the school to test him. Anyone have a child with this? How did you get it diagnosed?

 

Motor dysgraphia is due to deficient fine motor skills, poor dexterity, poor muscle tone, or unspecified motor clumsiness. Motor dysgraphia may be part of the larger problem of motor apraxia. Generally, written work is poor to illegible, even if copied by sight from another document. Letter formation may be acceptable in very short samples of writing, but this requires extreme effort and an unreasonable amount of time to accomplish, and cannot be sustained for a significant length of time. Writing long passages is extremely painful and cannot be sustained. Letter shape and size becomes increasingly inconsistent and illegible. Writing is often slanted due to holding a pen or pencil incorrectly. Spelling skills are not impaired. Finger tapping speed results are below normal.

Edited by jasonclancy0428

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I know of someone with children in the south paulding area schools diagnosed with this issue. I will have her contact you with her journey to get them diagnosed and extra help with school testing. (CRCT, etc)

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I have a 3rd graded that I think may have this but not sure how to go about getting the school to test him. Anyone have a child with this? How did you get it diagnosed?

 

Motor dysgraphia is due to deficient fine motor skills, poor dexterity, poor muscle tone, or unspecified motor clumsiness. Motor dysgraphia may be part of the larger problem of motor apraxia. Generally, written work is poor to illegible, even if copied by sight from another document. Letter formation may be acceptable in very short samples of writing, but this requires extreme effort and an unreasonable amount of time to accomplish, and cannot be sustained for a significant length of time. Writing long passages is extremely painful and cannot be sustained. Letter shape and size becomes increasingly inconsistent and illegible. Writing is often slanted due to holding a pen or pencil incorrectly. Spelling skills are not impaired. Finger tapping speed results are below normal.

 

 

I have a child with this diagnoses. PM me with questions if you like.

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Yes. My child's diagnosis came from a Dr. I just couldn't trust the school system with getting it right (long story).

 

Short version.

She's doing fine. Handwriting is still horrible. The only modification we are using with school assignments is an increased amount of computer work. When using the computer to type her school work she does not have a fear of writing. It has sort of liberated her.

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Both my boys have dysgraphia. It is a co-morbidity of their Tourettes Syndrome. They were diagnosed by their neurologist. They are both in college now and their handwriting has improved enough that I can read it if I try hard. In middle and high school they had computer access to do all of their work. My oldest son was on a 504 plan and he was provided a laptop. My youngest son who had an IEP was just provided access to computers to do his work. He also had the school occup-ational therapist work with him every week on his handwriting. Once you have the diagnosis the school should not fight too much on getting them a computer, or access. You should also ask for copies of notes and overheads. My kids could never take notes in class because it took so much of their thought process to do the writing that they did not comprehend anything that they wrote. So they listened to the teacher and then they were provided notes. Depending on how it effects your child, there are accomodations that can and should be made.

Just so you know, the school's tight budget is their excuse these days not to provide what the kids need. However, if you have a doctor write a letter stating what your child needs to be successful in the school they will have to provide those services unless they are outrageous. Let me know what you find out.

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Thank you all so much for your information. So should I just bypass trying to get the school to test him and take him instead to a neurologist or is this something a pediatrician can test him for?

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Something you could do on your own in the mean time is see if they have the same problem typing out their thoughts as they have writing them. If typing fast enough is a problem, you can get cheap (maybe even free on-line) programs to teach your child proper keying on a keyboard. If they can type fast enough, and they are able to type out their thoughts, it will make life much easier and would be great info for the doctor/school to use in making decisions about your child's education. Its not a waste of time either way, they learn to type properly.

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Both my boys have dysgraphia. It is a co-morbidity of their Tourettes Syndrome. They were diagnosed by their neurologist. They are both in college now and their handwriting has improved enough that I can read it if I try hard. In middle and high school they had computer access to do all of their work. My oldest son was on a 504 plan and he was provided a laptop. My youngest son who had an IEP was just provided access to computers to do his work. He also had the school occup-ational therapist work with him every week on his handwriting. Once you have the diagnosis the school should not fight too much on getting them a computer, or access. You should also ask for copies of notes and overheads. My kids could never take notes in class because it took so much of their thought process to do the writing that they did not comprehend anything that they wrote. So they listened to the teacher and then they were provided notes. Depending on how it effects your child, there are accomodations that can and should be made.

Just so you know, the school's tight budget is their excuse these days not to provide what the kids need. However, if you have a doctor write a letter stating what your child needs to be successful in the school they will have to provide those services unless they are outrageous. Let me know what you find out.

 

 

Interesting....my daughter's handwritting is PITIFUL, to the point that it is sometimes not even ledgible (she tries to erase, but, doesn't get it all, then writes over it, spacing is awful, etc)...wonder if this could be the cause?

 

Please PM me more info fishnthec....

 

ETA: she is ADHD, Asperger's, Tourette's and history of abnormal brain waves (with no seizure activity)

Edited by P.C. Shopper

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Honestly, your best bet is to get it independantly diagnosed. The school has to consider an individual diagnosis. When you turn it over to the school, it's up to them to do their own testing, but the clock starts running.

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Thank you all so much for your information. So should I just bypass trying to get the school to test him and take him instead to a neurologist or is this something a pediatrician can test him for?

You can absolutely ask the school to test him. Remember that they are working for a school system that is trying to pinch pennies though. I preferred to get my children independently evaluated by my own doctors. THat way I know his only agenda is to do what is best for the child. If your insurance will cover it I would say definitely go through a neurologist. I LOVE Child Neurology Associates. They are across from Scottish Rite. You don't have to tell me, I know it is private, but if your child is having dysgraphia it is usually accompanied by another diagnosis. (ADHD, Autism, etc) If that is the case with your child and insurance allows I would recommend getting a complete neuropsychological exam at Scottish Rite. Dr. Kathleen O'Toole is awesome and she writes the paperwork for the school to follow. If dysgrapia is his only issue then you are okay to go to your family doctor, but he will probably refer you to neurology. You may need to have him servered under a 504 or IEP to get school services but that is no big deal.

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Thank you all so much for your information. So should I just bypass trying to get the school to test him and take him instead to a neurologist or is this something a pediatrician can test him for?

 

I would go right to the neurologist. I know that a neuro has to be the one to diagnose apraxia (my son has it) the school system was fighting that diagnoses until 2 years ago. I don't think the school system can diagnose them anyway.

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First I would like to thank you all for helping me with this. It means a lot to be able to reach out to your community and have people willing to take time to help. I got an email back from Connor's teacher and I want to share it and get your opinions. Do I just let the school handle this or while they are doing their "legwork" do some of my own also.

 

Ms. Stanley,

I will need to open a Response to Intervention (RTI) and take data for several weeks before Connor can be tested. In the meantime, I am sending this email to Molly Weaver, Occupational Therapist for PCSD, Nicole Kaiser, School Psychologist, and Alecia White, Speech Pathologist. I am concerned with Connor's speech, and I would like for her to listen to him. I will keep you informed when we need to have an initial meeting to further discuss the RTI process and goals for Connor. Thanks for your support!

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If you choose to use the school I suggest you request a timeline for the process and see if it is acceptable with your and your plans for your child's education. I know several people who have gone through the school system and had the process last up to one and a half years or more.

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I would got private physician if insurace allows. The school can only do the testing and give you the results. They can not diagnois you will then take the paperwork from school to you physician to review.

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I think you are right. Took them a year and a half just to test my daughter for venture so I should know by now their testing is a little slow. I will be calling my doctor to get him a referral for the neurologist ASAP. Thanks again :)

Edited by jasonclancy0428

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First I would like to thank you all for helping me with this. It means a lot to be able to reach out to your community and have people willing to take time to help. I got an email back from Connor's teacher and I want to share it and get your opinions. Do I just let the school handle this or while they are doing their "legwork" do some of my own also.

 

Ms. Stanley,

I will need to open a Response to Intervention (RTI) and take data for several weeks before Connor can be tested. In the meantime, I am sending this email to Molly Weaver, Occupational Therapist for PCSD, Nicole Kaiser, School Psychologist, and Alecia White, Speech Pathologist. I am concerned with Connor's speech, and I would like for her to listen to him. I will keep you informed when we need to have an initial meeting to further discuss the RTI process and goals for Connor. Thanks for your support!

The response from the teacher is standard and supportive. I agree that an independent diagnosis would help, but I doubt it will expedite the process. Slow is slow.

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The response from the teacher is standard and supportive. I agree that an independent diagnosis would help, but I doubt it will expedite the process. Slow is slow.

It starts a timeline seperate from the RTI timeline.

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