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MissSophie

Ok all you wonderful southern cooks

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I attended a business lunch today and they served greens w. bacon. But there was a delicious sweetness to them; almost like it had nutmeg?

 

Any ideas or recipes on what it was?

 

Thanks!

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I have a recipe for collards that I put a small amount of molasses in. Perhaps that was it??

 

Maybe! Someone at the table said they had a recipe that called for syrup - might be similar to yours. I am willing to try it. As a transplanted yankee; I did not grow up with greens but I like them. This was the best I have ever tasted.

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I've never had sweet collards, yuk!

 

But my husband's mother always put sugar in theirs.

 

I don't.

 

But I do use bacon, what in the world is good 'ol collard greens without some pork fat?

 

Makes 'em good and greasy.

 

:)

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe! Someone at the table said they had a recipe that called for syrup - might be similar to yours. I am willing to try it. As a transplanted yankee; I did not grow up with greens but I like them. This was the best I have ever tasted.

 

 

Just wondering, do you put sugar on your grits?

 

Or do you even eat grits?

 

I'm glad you liked the collards, and you always gotta have some cornbread to go with 'em.

 

Welcome to the south and hope you find the taste you're looking for.

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I've never had sweet collards, yuk!

 

But my husband's mother always put sugar in theirs.

 

I don't.

 

But I do use bacon, what in the world is good 'ol collard greens without some pork fat?

 

Makes 'em good and greasy.

 

:)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just wondering, do you put sugar on your grits?

 

Or do you even eat grits?

 

I'm glad you liked the collards, and you always gotta have some cornbread to go with 'em.

 

Welcome to the south and hope you find the taste you're looking for.

 

 

I love grits; but never tried sugar. I like butter, or gravy, or mixed with eggs; or all three!! I have been here for 30 years and love the south; it is truly my home. Remarkedly enough, the cooking here is very similar to Pennsylvania Dutch; which is where I am from. So I love it!!

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I got this recipe out of the AJC years ago. I wouldn't eat collards until I cooked them this way.

 

1 bunch collards

1 smoked Ham Hock (you could use bacon)

1 medium onion

2 t. minced fresh garlic

2-3 t. cider vinegar

2-3 t. dark cane syrup (I use molasses here)

1 t. salt (or to taste)

1/2 t. to taste red pepper, black pepper and white pepper (I use 1/2 t. of each)

few dashes of hot pepper sauce

 

Cut off and discard base of stems, the chop upper stems and leaves coursely. Wash several times in cold water and drain thoroughly. Place 1 cup of packed greens in the food processor or blender; puree and set aside. Place remaining greens and ham hocks in a large pot; cover with water. Bring to a rolling boil. Add onions, garlic, vinegar, cane syrup and seasonings to taste. Add pureed collards. Cover and cook 2 hours, or until cooked down and tender (including stems), checking occasionally to adjust seasonings.

 

Hope you like them. :)

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There is an art to cooking collard greens just right.

I start with ham hocks or what I call ham render which is the skin, fat, and sometimes bone of a ham cooked down, divided into baggies and frozen for greens or beans.

 

A ham hock or bacon needs to be boiled down for an hour or so then more water added and brought to a boil.

 

The greens are added, you can not time them, you go by the smell, the minute you get a whiff of green stink you turn off the heat, then add your sweetener, I use very little, mine do not have a sweet taste, I use enough to cut the bitter.

 

You let them steep for a couple of hours then bring them to a boil just before serving.

 

They probably used the maple flavored bacon you can buy at the store.

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There is an art to cooking collard greens just right.

I start with ham hocks or what I call ham render which is the skin, fat, and sometimes bone of a ham cooked down, divided into baggies and frozen for greens or beans.

 

A ham hock or bacon needs to be boiled down for an hour or so then more water added and brought to a boil.

 

The greens are added, you can not time them, you go by the smell, the minute you get a whiff of green stink you turn off the heat, then add your sweetener, I use very little, mine do not have a sweet taste, I use enough to cut the bitter.

 

You let them steep for a couple of hours then bring them to a boil just before serving.

 

They probably used the maple flavored bacon you can buy at the store.

 

 

That makes sense, I've never tried boiling the ham hock or bacon in advance. I bet it would only make it that much better. :) They could have sprinkled some fried bacon in just before serving. Restaurants and Chefs love the impact of how it looks :)

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I get a couple of those fatty country style pork ribs and boil them in salted water until they're tender. Then I add the chopped collards to the boiling ribs. I only add a pinch of sugar if - and only if the collards taste bitter. Usually if you get them after the first frost, they won't be bitter. Remove the ribs, separate the meat from the bone and fat and add back to the collards. Big ol' iron skillet of cornbread and you're all set!

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I attended a business lunch today and they served greens w. bacon. But there was a delicious sweetness to them; almost like it had nutmeg?

 

Any ideas or recipes on what it was?

 

Thanks!

It was probably nutmeg.

I love the greens at Shane's Rib Shack, (some days better than others).

A couple years ago when they were on 41 I fell in love with them and

asked the cook what the secret ingredient was that made them taste so good.

He smiled and whispered "nutmeg, but a little goes a long way in greens".

Edited by tranquility

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I buy the ham chunks, add a little butter and hot sauce.

I let them cook just long enough for the hot sauce to thicken

then pour it all in my greens. yum !

You have to like hot sauce because they are a little hot.

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I cook my collards with chicken broth and a ham hock from a ham that had the honey coating sugary stuff on it, it's mmmm mmmm goooood!!!! Too bad I can't eat any greens, while I'm on coumadin :( :cray: :cray: (per dr's, strict orders!!) I can't have anything (other than green beens) green and I love my green foods!!!! However, I will eat my green beens and like it!!!! :good:

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I know that a little sugar helps to get rid of that stink that you get from cooking things like cabbage or greens.

 

The way I cook mine is I fry up a few pieces of bacon until all the fat is rendered then I add the greens to the fat. Fry the greens a few minutes then add very little water and a couple pinches of sugar. The sugar doesnt make them sweet though.

 

Sometimes I add a little sweet onion to the fat before putting in the greens.

Edited by TMKONA29M

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I get rave reviews for my collards. Even my elders who have been cooking them for years say mine are the best. My secret: I fill a big pot with my washed and torn up greens, I add enough water to cover them and throw in a ham hock. I either use one I have in the freezer (I bake hams several times a year) or I buy a package at the grocery. I add a little salt and pepper and a couple of table spoons of sugar. Bring it to a boil, turn it down to simmer, lid the pot and walk away for several hours. I usually cook them for between 3 and five hours on a low simmer. Basically when little pieces of the ham meat start falling off the bone, that's when I count them done.

 

That's its, nothing more and everyone raves about how good they are. I add salt and pepper and pepper juice from my mama's canned peppers to taste when I serve them.

 

That's it. I also happen to think that collards, cabbage and brussell sprouts all smell DELICIOUS while they are cooking.

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I get rave reviews for my collards. Even my elders who have been cooking them for years say mine are the best. My secret: I fill a big pot with my washed and torn up greens, I add enough water to cover them and throw in a ham hock. I either use one I have in the freezer (I bake hams several times a year) or I buy a package at the grocery. I add a little salt and pepper and a couple of table spoons of sugar. Bring it to a boil, turn it down to simmer, lid the pot and walk away for several hours. I usually cook them for between 3 and five hours on a low simmer. Basically when little pieces of the ham meat start falling off the bone, that's when I count them done.

 

That's its, nothing more and everyone raves about how good they are. I add salt and pepper and pepper juice from my mama's canned peppers to taste when I serve them.

 

That's it. I also happen to think that collards, cabbage and brussell sprouts all smell DELICIOUS while they are cooking.

 

 

That's the way I have always seen it done too. The only exception, I prefer Tabasco on mine instead of the clear pepper sauce.

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I get rave reviews for my collards. Even my elders who have been cooking them for years say mine are the best. My secret: I fill a big pot with my washed and torn up greens, I add enough water to cover them and throw in a ham hock. I either use one I have in the freezer (I bake hams several times a year) or I buy a package at the grocery. I add a little salt and pepper and a couple of table spoons of sugar. Bring it to a boil, turn it down to simmer, lid the pot and walk away for several hours. I usually cook them for between 3 and five hours on a low simmer. Basically when little pieces of the ham meat start falling off the bone, that's when I count them done.

 

That's its, nothing more and everyone raves about how good they are. I add salt and pepper and pepper juice from my mama's canned peppers to taste when I serve them.

 

That's it. I also happen to think that collards, cabbage and brussell sprouts all smell DELICIOUS while they are cooking.

 

That's how I cook mine, as well, Mark - Except I add a dash of liquid smoke that gives it a unique flavor/aroma.

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has anyone here ever ate dandelion greens? You have to pick the greens while they are young and tender, and fix them like mustards...honest they are good

 

 

I prefer them raw in a salad.

 

I have also had them where they were just wilted with hot bacon grease.

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1 hour ago, tacomako said:

I want to recommend you a salad recipe that I recently found. I was just thrilled.

 

southern chicken salad

 

I think you will like it.

 

Southern-Chicken-Salad-prev.jpg

 OMG!!!  what to do!?!?  That Looks DELICIOUS!!:good:

 

Thank you for taking the time to bring this BLAST from the PAST ALIVE!

Have an AWESOME Sunday!

 

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