Jump to content

Recent Topics Recent Topics

Photo
- - - - -

My family thinks my son is autistic...


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
62 replies to this topic

#1 masonsmommy23

masonsmommy23

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:42 PM

My son is 3 years old on april the 8th of this year.

I does not speak in sentences or puts two words together.
He repeats somethings I say and recognizes people and objects and call them by name.

He is very anti-social. He is very happy by himself.
When anyone tries to enter act with him he shows almost no interest.

He is a happy little boy with alot of family around who shows him constant love and attention!


I know I may sound like I know nothing about this topic but my family has shown great concern for him.

Can anyone please help understand this more?
Thanks in advance...
*~MasonsMommy23~*

#2 Gleemp

Gleemp

    Icon

  • +Member Plus Black
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,508 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:45 PM

Sorry you are worried but really a qualified , doctor would be in order if you have questions about your child..

#3 SouthernChickie

SouthernChickie

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,195 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:48 PM

Yes, he sounds like my neighbor kid. Who didn't SAY ANTHING until he was about 4. He wasn't too anti-social, but his mom freaked out because he wouldn't speak.. (He was a grunter..) so she had him tested. The test people were also concerned about his speech issues and worked with him with little progress..

He started pre-K and came out of his shell slowly. He is now 10, has a small (cute) speech impediment and is my favorite kid in the enitre hood..

Take all the advise your family is giving you and throw it out the window... If you feel something is wrong, have him accessed by a professional.
"I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond". Mae West

#4 Grayce

Grayce

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,454 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:50 PM

A Dr. would be where you need to start! They have come along way with specialist for autistic children.

Some learn slower than others, but the Dr, would tell me what is wrong, if anything.


Good Luck!

Edited by Grayce, 08 May 2009 - 06:50 PM.

Sometimes I just want to be left alone.........And sometimes I don't!

Georgia is always on my mind......Dawg Fan, Falcons on Sundays and Hawks on the nights they play and I can't leave out the Braves.......love them all EXCEPT Tech...lol

#5 Nolongerhere

Nolongerhere

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,704 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:51 PM

My oldest didn't talk at ALL until he was 4 years old. People and doctors thought there was something wrong with him. Nope .. nothing. At 4 he started talking and could read " anything " by the age of 5. His kindergarten teacher told me that Einstein also didn't talk until he was 5. It is actually a sign of intelligence smile.gif That son is now 18 and in second year of college. He graduated at the age of 16. All kids are different, don't let it get to you. Tomorrow is truly a mystery wub.gif Sounds like you have a wonderful little boy.
Moved on to a more positive and enriching environment =)

#6 masonsmommy23

masonsmommy23

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:53 PM

QUOTE (Grayce @ May 8 2009, 07:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A Dr. would be where you need to start! They have come along way with specialist for autistic children.

Some learn slower than others, but the Dr, would tell me what is wrong, if anything.


Good Luck!



I have express this concern to his doctor and he just keeps "encouraging" to just work with him. I will leave the practices name out of this but if you know (or anyone knows) a good peditricain they would recommend please let me know!!!
*~MasonsMommy23~*

#7 masonsmommy23

masonsmommy23

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:56 PM

QUOTE (Teatime @ May 8 2009, 07:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My oldest didn't talk at ALL until he was 4 years old. People and doctors thought there was something wrong with him. Nope .. nothing. At 4 he started talking and could read " anything " by the age of 5. His kindergarten teacher told me that Einstein also didn't talk until he was 5. It is actually a sign of intelligence smile.gif That son is now 18 and in second year of college. He graduated at the age of 16. All kids are different, don't let it get to you. Tomorrow is truly a mystery wub.gif Sounds like you have a wonderful little boy.



Thank you for your story. It really does help. I dont feel in my heart that he is. I think he is working at his own pace.

And my mace face is the best thing that ever happened to me he is perfect in my eyes no matter what...

Your words make me hopeful and thank you
*~MasonsMommy23~*

#8 Grayce

Grayce

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,454 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:02 PM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 07:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have express this concern to his doctor and he just keeps "encouraging" to just work with him. I will leave the practices name out of this but if you know (or anyone knows) a good peditricain they would recommend please let me know!!!



Try Childrens Health Care in Atlanta. Call and they can refer a Dr.

I would never let anyone dignose my child except a specialist, I am not trying to sound rude but when others tell you something like that ( i would be upset) .Have you ask where they got their information? So many kids get "labeled" and medicated for no reason.

Some kids learn slower, some learn faster than maybe the other grand children have. No two kids are alike and should never be compared to the other.

Sometimes I just want to be left alone.........And sometimes I don't!

Georgia is always on my mind......Dawg Fan, Falcons on Sundays and Hawks on the nights they play and I can't leave out the Braves.......love them all EXCEPT Tech...lol

#9 Nolongerhere

Nolongerhere

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,704 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:04 PM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 07:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank you for your story. It really does help. I dont feel in my heart that he is. I think he is working at his own pace.

And my mace face is the best thing that ever happened to me he is perfect in my eyes no matter what...

Your words make me hopeful and thank you



Listen to your mommy voice, seriously every child is different. Labels do not help children .. let him grow at his own pace. smile.gif
Moved on to a more positive and enriching environment =)

#10 masonsmommy23

masonsmommy23

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:05 PM

QUOTE (Grayce @ May 8 2009, 08:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Try Childrens Health Care in Atlanta. Call and they can refer a Dr.

I would never let anyone dignose my child except a specialist, I am not trying to sound rude but when others tell you something like that ( i would be upset) .Have you ask where they got their information? So many kids get "labeled" and medicated for no reason.

Some kids learn slower, some learn faster than maybe the other grand children have. No two kids are alike and should never be compared to the other.


i think media news and hear say is their information source. But the only other grand son/ nephew is 8 months younger and far more advance in speech. but they both communicate non verbally on the same level.

I know they are just concerned but I WAS really upset by the thought. I dont know enough about it to understand it. Or if this is a cause for concern for my son or if he just has a speech delay?

*~MasonsMommy23~*

#11 P.C. Shopper

P.C. Shopper

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,062 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:13 PM

My daughter is autistic, and she has a team of Dr.s.

The pediatrician should "catch" it at his yearly appointments. My daughter sees a developmental Pediatricain (Dr. Miller in Carrollton), sees a psyciatrist at Marcus (Dr. Panaritis), goes to therapy at Sheltered Cove in Dallas (David Russell) and has been seen/ tested by a Neuropsycologist at Scottish Rite.

It's a LONG hard road, good luck!
"When life throws you lemons, make lemonade"

#12 jmd

jmd

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,391 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:23 PM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 06:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My son is 3 years old on april the 8th of this year.

I does not speak in sentences or puts two words together.
He repeats somethings I say and recognizes people and objects and call them by name.

He is very anti-social. He is very happy by himself.
When anyone tries to enter act with him he shows almost no interest.

He is a happy little boy with alot of family around who shows him constant love and attention!


I know I may sound like I know nothing about this topic but my family has shown great concern for him.

Can anyone please help understand this more?
Thanks in advance...


I seriously doubt he is or your dr. would of caught it. He is just a child that likes to be by himself. One of my sons had a hard time talking and putting together sentences. Usually I understood him. No one else did though. He had some extra help with speech before entering school. He just graduated with his bach. degree. So don't fret. Everyone has this image of how a small child should be progressing or how their personality should be. They are all different.



#13 treasure

treasure

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,634 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:27 PM

I used to keep children for a living and witnessed 2 first hand that were autistic.
DO not let what you are seeing scare you.
However, 2 very big things to watch for is whether your child turns around in cirlces alot or needs to constantly touch objects.
I would not be too concerned about the lack of verbal communication.

Life is too short to worry.
Live like you were dying.

#14 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 07:53 PM

I have a 19 yo son with Asperger's syndrome which is on the autism spectrum. He is a brilliant young man and he is in college and doing very well. So even if your child was to be "labelled" you should not be discouraged. My son is a brighter, more receptive person because of it. He has challenges but everyone does. His are just different from some other folks. He spoke very little before the age of 3 and he played mostly by himself. When he got in school we thought he was just really shy. I guess my best advice is to find a good neurologist (I like Child Neurology in Atlanta) and let them check him out. But if the outcome is that your son has autism it sounds as if he is high functioning. You should embrace it and treat it as a gift and not a disability. BTW...many people think that Einstein had Aspergers as well as Bill Gates. wink.gif

Editted to ask: My son wanted me to ask about how he plays. Does he line his toys up?

Edited by fishnthec, 08 May 2009 - 08:21 PM.


#15 myangel107

myangel107

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:25 PM

In my opinion if you have the slightest feeling something could be wrong you should probably contact someone such as babies cant wait. If I remember correctly they can come out and do initial testing. You might try pming readingrules she seems to be an expert in these areas.



Arguing with a fool proves there are two.
Doris M. Smith

#16 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:28 PM

QUOTE (myangel107 @ May 8 2009, 09:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In my opinion if you have the slightest feeling something could be wrong you should probably contact someone such as babies cant wait. If I remember correctly they can come out and do initial testing. You might try pming readingrules she seems to be an expert in these areas.

Good advice, Readingrules would know how to contact babies can't wait.

#17 P.C. Shopper

P.C. Shopper

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,062 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:35 PM

QUOTE (fishnthec @ May 8 2009, 08:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a 19 yo son with Asperger's syndrome which is on the autism spectrum. He is a brilliant young man and he is in college and doing very well. So even if your child was to be "labelled" you should not be discouraged. My son is a brighter, more receptive person because of it. He has challenges but everyone does. His are just different from some other folks. He spoke very little before the age of 3 and he played mostly by himself. When he got in school we thought he was just really shy. I guess my best advice is to find a good neurologist (I like Child Neurology in Atlanta) and let them check him out. But if the outcome is that your son has autism it sounds as if he is high functioning. You should embrace it and treat it as a gift and not a disability. BTW...many people think that Einstein had Aspergers as well as Bill Gates. wink.gif

Editted to ask: My son wanted me to ask about how he plays. Does he line his toys up?


That is who we use too...but not for the autism part. My daughters reg. Dr. is Janas, but, while in the hosp. she saw Dr. Chang and Dr. Flamini...I love both of them wub.gif
"When life throws you lemons, make lemonade"

#18 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 08:41 PM

QUOTE (P.C. Shopper @ May 8 2009, 09:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That is who we use too...but not for the autism part. My daughters reg. Dr. is Janas, but, while in the hosp. she saw Dr. Chang and Dr. Flamini...I love both of them wub.gif

We have seen several of them at child neurology and like them all. They are just good at what they do. I recommend them for anyone who is looking for a neurologist for their kids.

#19 Paulding Navigator Team

Paulding Navigator Team

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,895 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE (myangel107 @ May 8 2009, 09:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In my opinion if you have the slightest feeling something could be wrong you should probably contact someone such as babies cant wait. If I remember correctly they can come out and do initial testing. You might try pming readingrules she seems to be an expert in these areas.


Thanks for the referral! lol smile.gif Unfortunately, Babies Can't Wait only services children that are below the age of three. Once they reach their 3rd birthday, they transition into the school system. I've pm'ed the poster and offered some ideas. Let me stress that it is VERY possible for a child to have autism and not be "caught" by the pediatrician. I wish I had a dime for everytime I've had a parent say their child's dr. waited too late or never saw the signs. Many children are diagnosed at the age of 3 and older. My own child wasn't diagnosed until he was already 4... fishnthec's son wasn't diagnosed until he was in highschool. It really depends on the characteristics of the child and their functioning level. If there are major concerns.... it's much better to be safe than sorry as far as having some testing completed. Early intervention is CRUCIAL for these babies, and there's no time to waste if he does have it. I highly recommend the Marcus Institute for initial testing and really want to stress that testing needs to be from a private source, NEVER with the school system. Just my opinion of course! smile.gif

#20 P.C. Shopper

P.C. Shopper

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,062 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:36 PM

QUOTE (ReadingRules @ May 8 2009, 10:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for the referral! lol smile.gif Unfortunately, Babies Can't Wait only services children that are below the age of three. Once they reach their 3rd birthday, they transition into the school system. I've pm'ed the poster and offered some ideas. Let me stress that it is VERY possible for a child to have autism and not be "caught" by the pediatrician. I wish I had a dime for everytime I've had a parent say their child's dr. waited too late or never saw the signs. Many children are diagnosed at the age of 3 and older. My own child wasn't diagnosed until he was already 4... fishnthec's son wasn't diagnosed until he was in highschool. It really depends on the characteristics of the child and their functioning level. If there are major concerns.... it's much better to be safe than sorry as far as having some testing completed. Early intervention is CRUCIAL for these babies, and there's no time to waste if he does have it. I highly recommend the Marcus Institute for initial testing and really want to stress that testing needs to be from a private source, NEVER with the school system. Just my opinion of course! smile.gif


good.gif

Boy, ain't that the truth ph34r.gif
"When life throws you lemons, make lemonade"

#21 masonsmommy23

masonsmommy23

    Paulding Com member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:06 PM

QUOTE (fishnthec @ May 8 2009, 08:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a 19 yo son with Asperger's syndrome which is on the autism spectrum. He is a brilliant young man and he is in college and doing very well. So even if your child was to be "labelled" you should not be discouraged. My son is a brighter, more receptive person because of it. He has challenges but everyone does. His are just different from some other folks. He spoke very little before the age of 3 and he played mostly by himself. When he got in school we thought he was just really shy. I guess my best advice is to find a good neurologist (I like Child Neurology in Atlanta) and let them check him out. But if the outcome is that your son has autism it sounds as if he is high functioning. You should embrace it and treat it as a gift and not a disability. BTW...many people think that Einstein had Aspergers as well as Bill Gates. wink.gif

Editted to ask: My son wanted me to ask about how he plays. Does he line his toys up?



yes he does all the time!!! what does that mean?
he plays mostly by hime self and pays attention to toy parts not the whole toy ( like the wheels on his cars)
*~MasonsMommy23~*

#22 tess

tess

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,375 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:07 PM

MY DD'S FRIEND DID NOT SPEAK UNTIL 3 & HAD A OLDER SIS THAT TALKED FROM BIRTH J/K...HIS MOM WAS REALLY CONCERNED.
HE GRADUATED # 1 IN HIS CLASS....GRADUATED FROM AN IVY LEAGUE SCHOOL WITH A 3.8 GP....SO HE JUST COULD NOT GET
A WORD IN WITH HIS MOM & SIS

[I AM NOT SHOUTING OR MAD....I HAVE THE CAPS LOCK ON
IF I AM MAD YOU WILL KNOW IT...I WILL
BE TYPING IN BLOOD


#23 Ash

Ash

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,000 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:41 PM

The Marcus Institute in Atlanta is the BEST they specialize in diagnosing and treating autism and learning and developmental delays, have him tested. My son is delayed in a few areas, he received therapy through Babies Can't Wait, and I was told by them, and his pediatrician if I thought it was more than what we had decided to see them, they can work wonders. Your son is too old for BCW (they age out at 3) but he can still be evaluated by MI and you can at least know for sure, and can tell them either to shut up and mind their own business, or that they were right.
My son is still not talking well, he turned 3 in Feb, but he has had SO many sinus/ear/throat problems that we know that is why he is a little behind. So, at least going and getting answers is better than not knowing. You be be pleasantly surprised that he IS just learning and growing at his own pace, not by any manual or someone elses standards.
Good luck!

Edited by Ash, 08 May 2009 - 10:52 PM.

Posted Image

Posted Image

#24 Ash

Ash

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,000 posts

Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:47 PM

I'm totally with you RR, they wanted my son to continue within the school system in special needs, a friend (a developmental behavioral pediatrician in C'ton) advised NOT to do that, he would be drawn down by kids who weren't truly his peers, to wait, not let the school system label him special needs. His OT (we both know her RR) and a very close friend advised the same thing.
Do the Marcus Inst. it takes a while to get in, so get a referral NOW, it won't hurt to have him checked and it will set your heart and mind at ease.
Posted Image

Posted Image

#25 jenilyn

jenilyn

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,336 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 03:20 AM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 06:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have express this concern to his doctor and he just keeps "encouraging" to just work with him. I will leave the practices name out of this but if you know (or anyone knows) a good peditricain they would recommend please let me know!!!


Have his hearing checked...same thing with my nephew..he is 2 &1/2 just now got the diagnosis of hearing problems. My sis has been putting drops that her dr. perscribed in his ears nightly & he is seriously like a different kid..although we do suspect some OCD or Asburgers (sp?)

No man ever stands taller than when he kneels to help another.

If they laugh at you because you're different, laugh at them because they're all the same.

#26 jenilyn

jenilyn

    Super Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,336 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 03:25 AM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 10:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
yes he does all the time!!! what does that mean?
he plays mostly by hime self and pays attention to toy parts not the whole toy ( like the wheels on his cars)


my nephew lines his cars up..he is 2 &1/2 & just starting to talk.. he's a great kid who is getting therapy.
No man ever stands taller than when he kneels to help another.

If they laugh at you because you're different, laugh at them because they're all the same.

#27 jmd

jmd

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,391 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 05:59 AM

QUOTE (ReadingRules @ May 8 2009, 09:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for the referral! lol smile.gif Unfortunately, Babies Can't Wait only services children that are below the age of three. Once they reach their 3rd birthday, they transition into the school system. I've pm'ed the poster and offered some ideas. Let me stress that it is VERY possible for a child to have autism and not be "caught" by the pediatrician. I wish I had a dime for everytime I've had a parent say their child's dr. waited too late or never saw the signs. Many children are diagnosed at the age of 3 and older. My own child wasn't diagnosed until he was already 4... fishnthec's son wasn't diagnosed until he was in highschool. It really depends on the characteristics of the child and their functioning level. If there are major concerns.... it's much better to be safe than sorry as far as having some testing completed. Early intervention is CRUCIAL for these babies, and there's no time to waste if he does have it. I highly recommend the Marcus Institute for initial testing and really want to stress that testing needs to be from a private source, NEVER with the school system. Just my opinion of course! smile.gif



In High school? I don't understand how it could get past all those years from the dr.

QUOTE
jenilyn Posted Today, 03:20 AM
QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 06:53 PM)
I have express this concern to his doctor and he just keeps "encouraging" to just work with him. I will leave the practices name out of this but if you know (or anyone knows) a good peditricain they would recommend please let me know!!!


Have his hearing checked...same thing with my nephew..he is 2 &1/2 just now got the diagnosis of hearing problems. My sis has been putting drops that her dr. perscribed in his ears nightly & he is seriously like a different kid..although we do suspect some OCD or Asburgers (sp?)


That is what was wrong with my son with his speech was his ears were clogged up and he couldn't hear good to make sense of words. His dr told me to have him blow balloons up and chew gum to help it.


Oh and I made a comment on how my youngest son loves to put all his cars in a line throughout the house when he was a toddler. I was told he was going to be an engineer when he got older. It was a trait of doing that.



#28 P.C. Shopper

P.C. Shopper

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,062 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 06:30 AM

QUOTE (jmd @ May 9 2009, 06:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In High school? I don't understand how it could get past all those years from the dr.


Because Autism is not something there is a difinitive test for. You can't just look at a child and say, this is what it is, especially when the child has alot of other issues going on (such as my daughter), many of the issues "overlap" with the Autism. We have been at this since age 5 (she is now going to be 10), and for every Dr. that dx her Asperger's, there is one that says "no". The school is just starting to see the "issues" too, and she's in 3 rd grade. To look at my daughter, and while in "first conversation" with her, you don't see the problem.


"When life throws you lemons, make lemonade"

#29 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 08:38 AM

QUOTE (jmd @ May 9 2009, 06:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In High school? I don't understand how it could get past all those years from the dr.


I can explain that one for you. My son was diagnosed in the third grade with Tourette Syndrome. All of his nerological and social issues were then assumed to be related to the Tourette syndrome. It was not until he was in high school and found a doctor that he was really comfortable in talking to and spent several hours with him in testing and talking sessions that the doctor informed me that my son also has Asperger's. Now, those of you who know me already know this story but I have worked, taken classes on and been very involved with autism and children with autism for the last 9 years of my life. So the diagnosis was not a surprise to me. I knew it already. I just really did not see the benefit in having the diagnosis at that point in time since he was already in high school. However, I was wrong. The diagnosis to my son was like a like switch tuning on. He knew that the Tourettes made him have the tics but he did not understand other things about himself until he got this diagnosis and began to study Asperger's. Since the diagnosis he seems more comfortable in his own skin and has taken control of his own health and advocates for himself in the college setting where he is now a sophmore and doing very well.
It is always better to get the diagnosis early on, I believe, but it is important if a person has Autism or Asperger's that they know it. It is also just as important that they not think it is something that is going to "disable" them. I work in the middle school school environment right now and I see kids everyday who, because the have a "disorder" believe they can't do the things that other kids can do. That is the most important role that the parent has!!!! I cannot stress this enough. If your child is diagnosed, do what you have to get them the help that they need but also treat them as normal as possible. Let your heart break for them privately when they are sad that they "don't have any friends". But to their face encourage them to try to do the things they want to do, even when you know they are going to fail. The best gift you can give them is inner strength, even when you feel like you have none to give.

#30 Paulding Navigator Team

Paulding Navigator Team

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,895 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 08:42 AM

QUOTE (fishnthec @ May 9 2009, 09:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I can explain that one for you. My son was diagnosed in the third grade with Tourette Syndrome. All of his nerological and social issues were then assumed to be related to the Tourette syndrome. It was not until he was in high school and found a doctor that he was really comfortable in talking to and spent several hours with him in testing and talking sessions that the doctor informed me that my son also has Asperger's. Now, those of you who know me already know this story but I have worked, taken classes on and been very involved with autism and children with autism for the last 9 years of my life. So the diagnosis was not a surprise to me. I knew it already. I just really did not see the benefit in having the diagnosis at that point in time since he was already in high school. However, I was wrong. The diagnosis to my son was like a like switch tuning on. He knew that the Tourettes made him have the tics but he did not understand other things about himself until he got this diagnosis and began to study Asperger's. Since the diagnosis he seems more comfortable in his own skin and has taken control of his own health and advocates for himself in the college setting where he is now a sophmore and doing very well.
It is always better to get the diagnosis early on, I believe, but it is important if a person has Autism or Asperger's that they know it. It is also just as important that they not think it is something that is going to "disable" them. I work in the middle school school environment right now and I see kids everyday who, because the have a "disorder" believe they can't do the things that other kids can do. That is the most important role that the parent has!!!! I cannot stress this enough. If your child is diagnosed, do what you have to get them the help that they need but also treat them as normal as possible. Let your heart break for them privately when they are sad that they "don't have any friends". But to their face encourage them to try to do the things they want to do, even when you know they are going to fail. The best gift you can give them is inner strength, even when you feel like you have none to give.



fishnthec... what you've written has really touched my heart and you are sooo right! As the saying goes.... "we've come a LONGGGGG way Baby" haven't we? It's definately been a journey!


#31 treasure

treasure

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,634 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 08:50 AM

One of the children I witnessed with autisim is doing great today.
At 2 years of age I knew he should be checked and talked to his mom about it. Her Dr. said they do not check until 4 or 5 years of age.
I told her to sit in the Drs. office and refuse to leave until she got answers. She did and he was sent to a specialist.
Then it was confirmed.
She sought all kinds of help for him. My chiropractor treated him free of charge to prove a point.
At his 2nd adjustment he looked at his mom and said, "MOM" plainly for the 1st time.
That lit a fire under her and she started seeking natural ways to help him. A metal detox, herbs, etc..
She finally ended up moving her family to N. Carolina because they are one of the only states that recognizes natural substances for medicinal purposes and will help her with schooling and other aid. He is doing wonderful now.
The moral of this story is----DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR YOUR CHILD AND YOUR FAMILY.
While not all people will agree with the steps she took it worked for them!

Life is too short to worry.
Live like you were dying.

#32 1Novella

1Novella

    Icon

  • +Member plus pink
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,347 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 08:51 AM

QUOTE (P.C. Shopper @ May 8 2009, 09:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That is who we use too...but not for the autism part. My daughters reg. Dr. is Janas, but, while in the hosp. she saw Dr. Chang and Dr. Flamini...I love both of them wub.gif

The genetics doc that I used to work for (one of the best in the southeast) ALWAYS referred to these docs. And considering that he also had an MD in neurology, I would consider that a BIG deal.
You have to be nice first. When that doesn't work, you can be mean. Once you've been mean, noone will believe the nice anymore. So be nice, even if it hurts.
More life lessons from Anita:
There are some things more important than physical survival. You've got to be able to look yourself in the mirror.
Guns aren't designed for comfort. It's one of the few things that are worn by men, that are as uncomfortable as a pair of high heels.
Change is inevitable and leading change makes it positive. Availability is not a qualification. Hope is not a strategy. Potato chips are not a vegetable, and hot dogs are not a meat. Feedback is a gift, and anyone who "unfriends" you on Facebook because of a disagreement wasn't truly your friend at all.
Posted Image

#33 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:04 AM

QUOTE (masonsmommy23 @ May 8 2009, 11:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
yes he does all the time!!! what does that mean?
he plays mostly by hime self and pays attention to toy parts not the whole toy ( like the wheels on his cars)

It is just One of the things that is common with children in the autism spectrum. If your child lines up his toys, he may just like them lined up. But with the other questions that you have I think it to put yourself at ease you should ask a professional and I agree that the school is not the correct setting to have him tested. I am sure your pediatrician can refer you to a neuologist who is on your insurance.
By the way, the joke at my house is that once my son started talking he has never shut up. If he is speaking words at 3, he will talk and he will drive you nuts like every other kid. wink.gif

#34 cobbobig

cobbobig

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,251 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:28 AM

This story was just put on 11alive.com and is relevant to your concerns. There is plenty of reason to be hopeful and proactive. I agree with many others here that it is time to get some testing done to determine just where your son is and what he needs. Knowledge is power. Good luck to you.
Headline: Some Children With Autism Can Recover, Study Suggests

http://www.11alive.c...s...46&catid=40

“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States when men were free.” Ronald Reagan

#35 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:42 AM

QUOTE (cobbobig @ May 9 2009, 10:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This story was just put on 11alive.com and is relevant to your concerns. There is plenty of reason to be hopeful and proactive. I agree with many others here that it is time to get some testing done to determine just where your son is and what he needs. Knowledge is power. Good luck to you.
Headline: Some Children With Autism Can Recover, Study Suggests

http://www.11alive.c...s...46&catid=40

Interesting. Not really sure how I feel about it. I don't want people to jump on the this and think that they can "cure" their children. There is hope that there is research being done.

#36 Paulding Navigator Team

Paulding Navigator Team

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,895 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 10:13 AM

I have a real problem with "recover" or "cured". I definately think progress can be made... to the point where it may be much harder to tell someone has it... but I also think there will still be characteristics. Before my son turned 13 his doctor told me several times that he didn't think he would be diagnosed with autism today, BUT once he turned 13 and hormones and puberty set in, we started dealing with an entire new set of issues. Maybe I could have said... my doctor says my son is cured, but in my heart and knowing what he deals with on a daily basis, I knew it wasn't true. According to the article even though they seemed to recover from autism, they had other things going on... well, some of those other things go along with having autism. I guess time will tell..... I'm all about being proactive and working to improve the quality of life... and I want families to have hope as well... but it's also an issue when parents can't afford the intense therapy their child needs and while one person says he's healed, another mom may be wishing she could just afford speech therapy. There's just so much that can/could be done... but money seems to hinder most of it. What a shame....

#37 fishnthec

fishnthec

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 11:03 AM

QUOTE (ReadingRules @ May 9 2009, 11:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a real problem with "recover" or "cured". I definately think progress can be made... to the point where it may be much harder to tell someone has it... but I also think there will still be characteristics. Before my son turned 13 his doctor told me several times that he didn't think he would be diagnosed with autism today, BUT once he turned 13 and hormones and puberty set in, we started dealing with an entire new set of issues. Maybe I could have said... my doctor says my son is cured, but in my heart and knowing what he deals with on a daily basis, I knew it wasn't true. According to the article even though they seemed to recover from autism, they had other things going on... well, some of those other things go along with having autism. I guess time will tell..... I'm all about being proactive and working to improve the quality of life... and I want families to have hope as well... but it's also an issue when parents can't afford the intense therapy their child needs and while one person says he's healed, another mom may be wishing she could just afford speech therapy. There's just so much that can/could be done... but money seems to hinder most of it. What a shame....

Agreed...we are a long way from using the word "cured" where autism is concerned.

#38 cobbobig

cobbobig

    Icon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,251 posts

Posted 09 May 2009 - 02:34 PM

QUOTE (fishnthec @ May 9 2009, 10:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Interesting. Not really sure how I feel about it. I don't want people to jump on the this and think that they can "cure" their children. There is hope that there is research being done.



It is interesting. I didn't get the feeling that this article was promising a "cure". It only uses the word "recover" but even that word might lead some to think the condition would be gone forever. However, it is encouraging that intensive therapy in many areas offers a lot of promise to allow people affected with autism to function at a high level.
“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States when men were free.” Ronald Reagan

#39 LibertyLady

LibertyLady

    Super Icon

  • +Member plus
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,270 posts

Posted 10 May 2009 - 06:36 PM

Babies Can't Wait is the program for children until they turn three. Since yours is already past that point, McKenna Farms is a great place to have him tested. Therapists there can do testing to see if your child needs therapy. They will not do therapy unless he needs it. You can call them at 770-443-9672. THey are located off Due West in Dallas. Their website is www.mckennafarmstherapy.org.

www.protectpaulding.com

#40 LibertyLady

LibertyLady

    Super Icon

  • +Member plus
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,270 posts

Posted 10 May 2009 - 06:40 PM

QUOTE (cobbobig @ May 9 2009, 10:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This story was just put on 11alive.com and is relevant to your concerns. There is plenty of reason to be hopeful and proactive. I agree with many others here that it is time to get some testing done to determine just where your son is and what he needs. Knowledge is power. Good luck to you.
Headline: Some Children With Autism Can Recover, Study Suggests

http://www.11alive.c...s...46&catid=40


I have seen children first hand recover from some disorders such as autism. Heavy detoxing of the system by a very qualified naturopathic or homeopathic doctor plus dietary changes such as nothing processed. No white flour or soy and no wheat can make a tremendous difference-plus non-commercial herbal and vitamin therapy. I am certain that SOMETIMES major changes can happen. smile.gif
www.protectpaulding.com




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Recent Topics Recent Topics