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Work from home plans/approaches


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#1 PUBBY

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 10:17 AM

It has come to my attention that some members are skeptical about work from home plans that charge for the job or for information on how to do so.

The classic one is the proverbial classified ad that says

Earn thousands stuffing envelopes from home.

Send $10.00 to this PO box for information


The payoff, of course, is that the person is encouraged to place classified ads in newspapers like the one that the person responded to and stuff envelopes with the idea that others should do the same.

It is from this humble con that skepticism over work from home schemes that charge money for information, for contacts or training come.

Obviously pcom has a new comme3rce member who is offering work from home customer service jobs of one sort or another. They have a couple of folks say they are 'employee' of this outfit and that they are doing well. Obviously, I am unaware of their business practices and, given the skepticism that work from home plans that involve payment of a fee for training, I will not at this time endorse this business nor will I condemn it.

As the rules of pcom prevent the posting of questioning or skeptical posts that might 'rain on the parade' of a commerce member, I recommend that folks posot their concerns and actual experiences here where they will not be subject to the Pcom rules (rather than in the topic started by the commerce member.).

I would also encourage the principals of the site in question to contact me personally to explain their business concept and practices so that I might provide the assurance they so dearly need if they expect to succeed with their venture on pcom.

pubby

#2 Hairazor

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 10:25 AM

QUOTE (PUBBY @ Jun 23 2008, 11:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It has come to my attention that some members are skeptical about work from home plans that charge for the job or for information on how to do so.

The classic one is the proverbial classified ad that says

Earn thousands stuffing envelopes from home.

Send $10.00 to this PO box for information


The payoff, of course, is that the person is encouraged to place classified ads in newspapers like the one that the person responded to and stuff envelopes with the idea that others should do the same.

It is from this humble con that skepticism over work from home schemes that charge money for information, for contacts or training come.

Obviously pcom has a new comme3rce member who is offering work from home customer service jobs of one sort or another. They have a couple of folks say they are 'employee' of this outfit and that they are doing well. Obviously, I am unaware of their business practices and, given the skepticism that work from home plans that involve payment of a fee for training, I will not at this time endorse this business nor will I condemn it.

As the rules of pcom prevent the posting of questioning or skeptical posts that might 'rain on the parade' of a commerce member, I recommend that folks posot their concerns and actual experiences here where they will not be subject to the Pcom rules (rather than in the topic started by the commerce member.).

I would also encourage the principals of the site in question to contact me personally to explain their business concept and practices so that I might provide the assurance they so dearly need if they expect to succeed with their venture on pcom.

pubby



I too, am wary of any business that you have to pay up front for anything. It kind of reminds me of my son looking for an agent for modeling/acting where they tell you how much they can do for your child, but you have to pay to have this and that done. ie...headshots, training ect. To me...if they thought he could make money for them then they should pay for those things. JMO


#3 PUBBY

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 12:55 PM

Hairazor:

the cash up front pretty much does raise a red flag but by the same token, I don't think it is an absolute rule that new business forms may not work that way.

As I understand this business, what they do is contract with this national company that handles contract workers for the fortune 500 companies mentioned. This company I believe is Arise.

Anyway, the local folks contract with them and they require things like a background check (the kind that costs money), etc. to process a new employee and they also expect the employee to be 'trained' in the basics of how to interface with the national computer bank, etc.

The company like arise used to either contract with or have the expense of a call center and all the computers, etc. that the employee would need as well as the cost of training and employing them.

Some one got the bright idea they could externalize it but they would probably need a new kind of 'employee management' company. Hence the rise of companies like seeingangelstwobytwo. That these new contracts from the established business seeks to maximize their profit and minimize the percentage earned by the new entities; it is certainly an option available to these new companies, whose task is now to manage workers working from home.

I get the feeling the 'investment' which primarily goes to cover costs, is also kind of like the puppy thing. That reasoning is that if someone pays to adopt a puppy or kitten they are more likely to take care of it and value it than if you give it to them for free.

Recognize also that work from home approaches in real business usually are restricted only to those who have a work history with a company. I.e. a new hire at say bellsouth is not likely to be able to work at home until they've been under management's eye for one or two years; even with the incentives for work at home a business may offer.

The ability to get 'hired on' as a contract worker working from home from the get go does provide the home-worker with some benefits such as no-commute cost and tax deductions for computer, telephone, broadband etc. I'm also told that these workers do get a W-2 ... taxes withheld, social security subsidized with employer's contribution, etc.

anyway, while we expect there to be some questions ... and they are legitimate ... the folks running seeingangelstwobytwo seem to be on the up and up. ... so much so that I understand that that Georgia Dept. of Labor is paying in at least some cases, the costs of training for those who are unemployment and seek employment here.

pubby

#4 bellaprincess

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 03:21 PM

QUOTE (PUBBY @ Jun 23 2008, 12:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hairazor:

the cash up front pretty much does raise a red flag but by the same token, I don't think it is an absolute rule that new business forms may not work that way.

As I understand this business, what they do is contract with this national company that handles contract workers for the fortune 500 companies mentioned. This company I believe is Arise.

Anyway, the local folks contract with them and they require things like a background check (the kind that costs money), etc. to process a new employee and they also expect the employee to be 'trained' in the basics of how to interface with the national computer bank, etc.

The company like arise used to either contract with or have the expense of a call center and all the computers, etc. that the employee would need as well as the cost of training and employing them.

Some one got the bright idea they could externalize it but they would probably need a new kind of 'employee management' company. Hence the rise of companies like seeingangelstwobytwo. That these new contracts from the established business seeks to maximize their profit and minimize the percentage earned by the new entities; it is certainly an option available to these new companies, whose task is now to manage workers working from home.

I get the feeling the 'investment' which primarily goes to cover costs, is also kind of like the puppy thing. That reasoning is that if someone pays to adopt a puppy or kitten they are more likely to take care of it and value it than if you give it to them for free.

Recognize also that work from home approaches in real business usually are restricted only to those who have a work history with a company. I.e. a new hire at say bellsouth is not likely to be able to work at home until they've been under management's eye for one or two years; even with the incentives for work at home a business may offer.

The ability to get 'hired on' as a contract worker working from home from the get go does provide the home-worker with some benefits such as no-commute cost and tax deductions for computer, telephone, broadband etc. I'm also told that these workers do get a W-2 ... taxes withheld, social security subsidized with employer's contribution, etc.

anyway, while we expect there to be some questions ... and they are legitimate ... the folks running seeingangelstwobytwo seem to be on the up and up. ... so much so that I understand that that Georgia Dept. of Labor is paying in at least some cases, the costs of training for those who are unemployment and seek employment here.

pubby


Thank you for the information.








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#5 jlh10101

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 09:57 PM

Please excuse me while I make a point. I am NOT defending the local company. BUT if you do the reasearch ie. go right to the source, you will learn all you need to know.

Here is a list from Clarl Howard that I have posted many times. As you can see Arise is the 2nd company listed. You can work directly for Arise without ever contacting SA2B2. All the info is there. the only difference is that you will be a 1099 contractor and therefore responsible for the payment of your taxes under the rules of the 16th ammendment and the 6 million page tax code.

Here is the list followed by a link to Clark's Page.




Would you like to work from home?

Clark gets tons of calls from people who would like to do database or customer service work out of their homes. The problem is that there are many ripoff work-from-home outfits that claim they will find you work for an upfront fee. They are just trying to make a quick buck off you. Below are some sites Clark has checked out and determined to be legitimate. Of course, you should check them out thoroughly yourself before getting involved. Good luck!

alpineaccess.com - virtual call center provider using home-based customer service agents

arise.com - answer calls, e-mail and chat requests for global companies at home. Some users have reported a $13 background check fee, a $99 assessment test fee and other charges.

convergysworkathome.com - be an independent contractor home agent providing customer care, human resources and billing services

elance.com - links freelancers with employers in IT, graphic design, writing, engineering, translation, marketing, accounting and administrative and legal services

intellicare.com - call center company that provides clinical and non-clinical telephone services to health plans, healthcare providers, and care managers nationwide

liveops.com - virtual call center using remote and home-based agents. Requires $30 fee for background check

msvas.com - this company has developed virtual assistant training programs for U.S. military spouses and U.S. Department of State Foreign Service spouses

teamdoubleclick.com - be a virtual assistant

wahm.com - an online magazine for work-at-home moms

west.com - be an "at-home-agent," with duties including obtaining, entering and verifying customer information, answering questions, resolving issues, explaining sales features or offering additional products or services

workingsolutions.com - be a home-based customer service agent

workplacelikehome.com - an active discussion forum where you'll discover lots of job leads

One bit of advice before you take the leap into a work-at-home opportunity: Take an inventory of your talent, add a dash of creativity to your thinking and come up with a plan that suits you.

If you sew well, do alterations for others.
If you have a good grasp of a particular subject, tutors are always needed.
Good with a computer? Consider teaching others how to use one. You might also want to do computer work for college and graduate students. Try putting up flyers around your area as well as the local colleges and universities.
Create personal websites for friends and neighbors. Parents might want to purchase one from you as a gift for a child. It can used for photos and 'firsts' as the child is growing. This makes a great gift to the parents of a newborn!
Are you handy with crafts? Costume jewelery making and selling can be aimed at school-aged girls or adults, and all well-priced gift items sell well especially before the holiday season.

The list can go on as long as you align your talents with services or products others need. Be imaginative and create a job! If you choose to go the standard work-at-home route, heed these warnings from the Federal Trade Commission and the Better Business Bureau.

Special thanks to our listener Carrie for her input into this list.

http://www.paulding....c...=9&t=160393


Oh yeah, one more thing. Since I mentioned taxes (as did PUBBY)

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#6 telracs eracniks

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 08:25 AM

QUOTE (SeeingAngelsTwobyTwo @ Aug 18 2008, 08:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank you for your response I am sure many will find that useful. smile.gif However, what nobody is mentioning is the plus side of working for SATBT is that we are a large family treating all of our agents with the up most respect and guidance making them successful. Not only that but you can also get monthly bonuses, health insurance and we do your taxes for you. That does not include the number of charities we help and the fun we have as a whole. We have a great team and there are plenty of reasons to go through SATBT. Feel free to PM for more information.



I may be wrong and please correct me if I am. I think one advantage of going through you is that of you are paid as a 1099 employee you have to pay self employment tax. I am right in that if a person goes through you they don't have to pay SEP?

I know when I was a 1099 employee it killed me to pay that.

Bruce

#7 SeeingAngelsTwobyTwo

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 09:55 AM

QUOTE (SCARLET INDULGENCE SKINCARE PLUS @ Aug 18 2008, 09:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I may be wrong and please correct me if I am. I think one advantage of going through you is that of you are paid as a 1099 employee you have to pay self employment tax. I am right in that if a person goes through you they don't have to pay SEP?

I know when I was a 1099 employee it killed me to pay that.

Bruce


Thank you Bruce!! Yes, that is correct. That is all taken care of and each agent receives a W-2

Ginger Smith, CEO/President
Seeing Angels Two by Two, LLC
(678) 873-6477

#8 southernbelle192

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE (jlh10101 @ Aug 17 2008, 10:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Please excuse me while I make a point. I am NOT defending the local company. BUT if you do the reasearch ie. go right to the source, you will learn all you need to know.

Here is a list from Clarl Howard that I have posted many times. As you can see Arise is the 2nd company listed. You can work directly for Arise without ever contacting SA2B2. All the info is there. the only difference is that you will be a 1099 contractor and therefore responsible for the payment of your taxes under the rules of the 16th ammendment and the 6 million page tax code.

Here is the list followed by a link to Clark's Page.




Would you like to work from home?

Clark gets tons of calls from people who would like to do database or customer service work out of their homes. The problem is that there are many ripoff work-from-home outfits that claim they will find you work for an upfront fee. They are just trying to make a quick buck off you. Below are some sites Clark has checked out and determined to be legitimate. Of course, you should check them out thoroughly yourself before getting involved. Good luck!

alpineaccess.com - virtual call center provider using home-based customer service agents

arise.com - answer calls, e-mail and chat requests for global companies at home. Some users have reported a $13 background check fee, a $99 assessment test fee and other charges.

convergysworkathome.com - be an independent contractor home agent providing customer care, human resources and billing services

elance.com - links freelancers with employers in IT, graphic design, writing, engineering, translation, marketing, accounting and administrative and legal services

intellicare.com - call center company that provides clinical and non-clinical telephone services to health plans, healthcare providers, and care managers nationwide

liveops.com - virtual call center using remote and home-based agents. Requires $30 fee for background check

msvas.com - this company has developed virtual assistant training programs for U.S. military spouses and U.S. Department of State Foreign Service spouses

teamdoubleclick.com - be a virtual assistant

wahm.com - an online magazine for work-at-home moms

west.com - be an "at-home-agent," with duties including obtaining, entering and verifying customer information, answering questions, resolving issues, explaining sales features or offering additional products or services

workingsolutions.com - be a home-based customer service agent

workplacelikehome.com - an active discussion forum where you'll discover lots of job leads

One bit of advice before you take the leap into a work-at-home opportunity: Take an inventory of your talent, add a dash of creativity to your thinking and come up with a plan that suits you.

If you sew well, do alterations for others.
If you have a good grasp of a particular subject, tutors are always needed.
Good with a computer? Consider teaching others how to use one. You might also want to do computer work for college and graduate students. Try putting up flyers around your area as well as the local colleges and universities.
Create personal websites for friends and neighbors. Parents might want to purchase one from you as a gift for a child. It can used for photos and 'firsts' as the child is growing. This makes a great gift to the parents of a newborn!
Are you handy with crafts? Costume jewelery making and selling can be aimed at school-aged girls or adults, and all well-priced gift items sell well especially before the holiday season.

The list can go on as long as you align your talents with services or products others need. Be imaginative and create a job! If you choose to go the standard work-at-home route, heed these warnings from the Federal Trade Commission and the Better Business Bureau.

Special thanks to our listener Carrie for her input into this list.

http://www.paulding....c...=9&t=160393


Oh yeah, one more thing. Since I mentioned taxes (as did PUBBY)


Thanks for the info!



#9 Murphyfallsdown

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 12:39 PM

QUOTE (southernbelle192 @ Aug 18 2008, 11:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was not forced to leave this company. I left my choice. I was not passed over for a higher position--this company creates positions that I have been told by the president that does not legally exist. Nor am I being investigated by authority for any reason. This company is not telling the truth about anything. I am not creating lies. I am telling the truth about everything. People have a right to know about a company before they get involved over their head. This comany and it's members need to quit creating lies and fabricating stories that are not true. If you want to know more, please feel free to PM me and I will be happy to answer any questions you might have!



I understand that you are mad but you could have taken a more tackful approach then posting on a public board and airing out your bussniess instead you should have said you had problems with this company and if anyone had questions they can pm you. I am not taking up for the company and not for you just trying to tell you that people will take you more seriously if they do not believe you are trying to be vengful. I hope things work out for both parties involved.JMO
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#10 telracs eracniks

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE (SeeingAngelsTwobyTwo @ Aug 18 2008, 10:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank you Bruce!! Yes, that is correct. That is all taken care of and each agent receives a W-2



My ex is working with you guys and is happy, she is the one with the quads. It works well for her to work from home given what day care would cost her.




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